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Full text of "Mechanical Contracting & Plumbing January-December 1923"

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Plumber and Steam fitter of Canada 



Vol. XVII. 



PUBLICATION OFFICE, TORONTO, JANUARY I, 1923 



No. I 




(MM® 



To Our Patrons:— 



In extending- our greeting to the trade for the coming- 
year, we wish to refer briefly to the Empire organization. 

The "Emco" line of plumbing and sanitary fixtures repre- 
sents the result of many years of practical and special- 
ized experience in this class of work. As designers and 
originators of making fittings for the plumbing trade, our 
engineering department is kept in touch with the most 
progressive ideas of the time. The successful develop- 
ment of many such ideas keeps the "Emco" line strictly 
up to date. 

Coupled with this long experience we have a modern, 
well-equipped shop and foundry with a staff of trained 
mechanics for turning out the work economically and to 
a high standard of quality. All of our castings are made 
under expert mechanical analysis insuring uniformity 
and quality. 



With your past favors in mind we look forward to further 
opportunities of serving your requirements during the 
coming year. Our aim is to serve, and by serving, to 
secure and hold the confidence of our patrons and friends. 

Empire Brass Mfg. Co. Limited 

London and Toronto, Canada 




Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 




PUSSYFOOT 

Stands out prominently as superior to all other 

Closet Tanks 



The New Patent Ballcock 

with the name cast on the large Chamber 
finds favor everywhere because of its 
Silence, Rapid Action, Simple Mechanism 



The attractive design and 
beauty of the tank itself, 
combined with its durabil- 
ity, is another feature and 
it is shipped to you secure- 
ly packed in case as here 
shown, which ensures it 
reaching you in good con- 
dition without any of those 
annoying mishaps which 
frequently cause delay — 

TANK, LID, and 
FITTINGS 

each packed separately, 
thus eliminating possibility 
of breakage. 





' STYLE D. 

PUSSYFOOT 
CLOSET TANK 



Every Pussyfoot 
Tank contains our 
Full Guarantee 
Label on the cover. 




OUR GUARANTEE 

This Pussyfoot Tank is guaranteed to the ex- 
tent that no matter how many years it has been 
in use, if a fault of material or workmanship- 
shows, we will replace with a new tank. 
The defective tank must be sent to us tor inspec- 
tion. 

THE CANADA METAL CO., LIMITED 

Toronto. Hamilton, Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouver, 



SPECIFY Pussyfoot to your Jobber, and make sure you get it. 

THE CANADA METAL COMPANY 

LIMITED 

Montreal Hamilton TORONTO Winnipeg Vancouver 



January 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



1 



Include Refinement in your 
Service by Selling the 





OUR NO. 20 "Quietus" Syphon Jet closet 
as its name implies is of the so-called 
"silent" type. It operates so quietly 
that its action when flushed cannot be heard 
outside of its immediate environment; yet it 
possesses the same unhesitating strong action 
for which all Canadian Vitreous closets are 
noted. 



IT IS modelled on simple dignified lines; it 
is vitreous through and through and its 
lustrous shimmering white-glazed surface 
coupled with its special attribute of real 
quietness of operation commends it to the 
discriminating buyer who would include the 
utmost of refinement in his choice of toilet- 
room equipment. 



CANADIAN POTTERIES 



LIMITED 



SAINT JOHNS 

QUEBEC 

Sales handled exclusively through recognized jobbers in plumbing supplies. 




Farmers 

Thousands 



The Anthes Syphon 



The Anthes syphon is 
the heart of the disposal 
system. 

Regularly, unfailingly, 
year after year, it will 
carry on its appointed 
work. There are no 
trick parts to get out of 
order, nothing to wear 
out nor rust out; once 
installed it is a perman- 
ent fixture. 



mm. 



» r';- ?.' 't'- 




■ 



Will Buy 

of Disposal Systems in 1923 



A bumper crop and fair prices have put the 
farmer again on his feet. To-day, with his 
debts paid and money in the bank he is 
"sitting pretty." 

Early next spring, thousands of these 
farmers, disgusted and sore because of 
the annoyances of an outdoor toilet in 
winter, will be ready to sign on the dotted 
line for the first sanitary engineer who 
talks Disposal Systems to them. Many 
will sign right now if you go after them 
properly. 

— And when you get this business, insist 
that Anthes soilpipe and the Anthes 
Syphon be used; you will thus be able 
to give your customer a permanent, sat- 
isfactory job, which will be right and stay 
right from the beginning. 



Anthes Foundry 

Limited 

Toronto and Winnipeg 




Manufacturers or 

Cast Iron Soil Pipe and Fittings 



4 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



January 1, 1923 



Markets 



Sanitary Engineer Marketing Reports are 
eagerly looked for by progressive plumb- 
ing and heating Engineers of Canada. 

A thorough knowledge of prevailing 
prices|and tendencies in the trade is an 
absolute necessity for the conduct of any 
business in these days of frequent price 
fluctuations. 

Sanitary Engineer Marketing Reports are 
compiled at considerable expense. We are 
determined to keep them reliable, com- 
plete, and up-to-date. 



Mais l^keer 

D lumber and Steamfitter of Canada 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 





Happy New Year 

Were we to allow the holiday season to pass without 
extending to the sanitary engineers of Canada heart- 
iest greetings, good wishes and warmest thanks for 
favors received, we would enter 1923 with our 
greatest debt undischarged. 

In the coming year we are going to turn in as never 
before to make more Ruud Heaters — and to tell the 
public more about them. We are going to work 
harder than ever to make it easy for you to sell 
Ruud Heaters to your customers. 

Selling gas water heaters will not, alone, make 1923 
a big business year for you ; but as we see it now, 
with the efforts we shall make to put over Ruud 
Heaters to the public, you will be able to devote 
most of your time to other matters ; just show a Ruud 
in your window and it will sell itself ; better stock 
up now in anticipation of spring requirements. 

May 1923 bring you good health, good luck and 
good business. 

iud Manufacturing Co. 

Toronto 




Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



January I, 1923 




January 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND StEAMFITTER 7 

ness was a fetish in the 
>f the Pharaohs 

♦ The Egyptians of old were scrupulously clean in their person ; 
any thing that savoured of untidiness was repugnant to them. 

They carried this passion for personal cleanliness so far that 
they even removed all superflous hair from their bodies and 
considering they had no razors and so had to pull the hairs 
out with pinchers, it must be admitted that they were sincere 
little members of the Sanitary Club. 

But they didn't wash very often. They had no bath tubs. 
Water was scarce, and was not so satisfactory a cleanser as 
the oils and unguents they used. These oils were absolutely 
necessary to protect their lightly clothed bodies from the hot 
suns and burning winds of that torrid land. 

To-day, in Canada, running around in abbreviated skirts with 
one's body smeared with oil is not being done by our best 
people. 

To-day Canadians need no retinue of slaves to keep them 
clean. To-day a ^tattdaiuf Sanitary bathroom affords 
every convenience, beauty and luxury that man can desire. 

To-day in every district in Canada ^tattdatfd" Plumbing 
Fixtures are regarded as the highest expression of modern 
decorative plumbing art. 

*£$>taitdai*d" Advertising is spreading this gospel broadcast. 

The sanitary engineer who stocks, displays and recommends 
^tattdatid" Fixtures will find his sales path smooth. 




Standard (Samta^lftfe.Co. 

Limited 

General Office and Factory: Itoyce and Lansdowne Aves., Toronto, Ont. 

Calgary: Hamilton Store: Montreal: 

354 11th Avenue West 26-28 Jackson Street West New Birks Bldg. 

Winnipeg Showrooms: Vancouver: 

145 Market Street East 860 Cambie Street 



"MADE IN CANADA" 




Plumbing and Heating contractors in Montreal, Toronto, Guelph, Ottawa, 
Windsor, Niagara Falls, Halifax, etc., are using the Henderson Business Service 
for pricing their jobs and find it a great time and money saver. 



Why they use it. 

They are receiving better prices with a great deal less complaints from their 
customers. They do not worry about price changes as we guarantee to keep them 
informed. Many of these men have been using our service for 5 years and would 
feel lost without it. 

How it works 

We furnish you with a big leather covered loose leaf book containing sug- 
gested retail prices on over 3,000 items in the plumbing and heating business. As 
cost prices change we change the sheets in your book. The cost of this service is 
about 10 cents per day or the price of a cigar. 

You owe it to your business to try it out for a year. It must have some 
merits or your fellow members of the trade would not use it. 



Henderson Business Service Limited 



BOX 123, BRANTFORD 



Try 
it 

Out 



ORIGINAL 



ORDER FORM 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 
RESALE SERVICE 



HENDERSON BUSINESS SERVICE, LIMITED. 

Box 123, Brantford, Ont. Date 

Dear Sirs: — 

You may enter our order for your Plumbing and Heating Resale Price Service or the follow- 
ing terms and conditions : — 

You are to furnish us with a loose-leaf Resale Price Book on Plumbing and Heating Material 
as supplied to the Plumbing and Keating' Trade throughout Canada for which we agree to 
pay you the sum of $36.00. Payment to be made as follows: — $9.00 with this order and three 
payments of $9.00 each at the end of each 3 months' period following. We agree to remit tio 
above payments by Money Order and failing to do this, will accept your sight drafts with exchange* 

You are to keep this book revised for the next 12 months by sending us whatever Change 
Sheets are issued from your office. 

At the expiration of this 12 months' period, you may continue supplying us with the Change 
Sheets whenever issued, until we notify you 30 days in advance of our wish to discontinue. We Agree 
to pay you the sum of $3.00 a month for this Service by remitting Money Order each month and failing 
to do this, will accept your s ght draft for $9.00 (with exchange) at the end of every 3 months. 

It is distinctly understood that these are suggested Resale Prices and we are under no obliga- 
tion or Agreement to maintain the prices compiled by you. 



Accepted by : 



Signed 



Street 



City 



January 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



9 



Standard Bath Fixtures 

STURDY— COMMON SENSE— ARTISTIC 



A 
BATH 
ORNAMENT 




A 

TRADE 
GETTER 



This Combination Consists of : 



(a) 1%" No. 4350 Oversize Waste and Over- 
flow with extended Tee adjustable hori- 
zontally and vertically. 

(b) A3500 Side China Handle Quaturn 
Quick Opening Bath Cock — lift the 
handle one-quarter turn for full flood 
of water. This Bath Cock has stand- 
ardized Quaturn working unit — all 
working parts renewable — the bodies 
stay installed permanently. 



(c) %" I. P. size and weight offset Bath 
Supplies, one piece floor to Bath Cock 
Shank. Brass Cone connection on sup- 
plies same as on ordinary tails. No 
knotty Ells — no unsightly tails — and so 
much easier to keep clean. 



And actually costs the dealer less. 



Jhe W allaceburg B rass & I ron M anu f actur i n g Company, Limited 

WALLACEBURG, ONT. 



TORONTO: 
Mr. L. N. Vanstone, 10 Wellington St. E. 
Telephone Main 2355 



WINNIPEG 
Moncrieff & Endress, Ltd., Gait Bldg. 
Telephone A-9135 



MONTREAL: 
G. M. Price, 10 Victoria St. 
Telephone Uptown 945 



J It 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



January 1, 1923 




"Here We Suffer Grief and Pain 



We find, however, in business that most of our cares 
and troubles are due to our own incompetence or 
carelessness. 

The sanitary engineer who is consistently losing 
money on contracts has only himself to blame ; the 
use of an ALLPRISER would automatically put him 
right in making out his estimates. 

Allpriser takes more grief out of plumbers' . lives 
than any other business help on the market. You 
can't go wrong on a price when you use Allpriser. 

WRITE TO-DAY 

K. B. ALLISON 
4 Irwin Avenue - Toronto, Ont. 



»» 




A New Sales Record 

Many plumbers and steam-fitters are 
out to establish a new sales-record on 
"Daisy" boilers during 1923. They have 
been inspired by encouraging results in 
past years through satisfied customers 
and good profits. They realize that the 
"Daisy" boiler is backed by a reputa- 
tion. 

Our customers are going to again bene- 
fit by our service during the coming 
year. Are you going to be one of them? 

We invite you. 

Warden King Limited 

MONTREAL 

Branch Office: 136 Simcoe Street, TORONTO 



January 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND StEAMFITTER 11 



SANITARY ENGINEER 

PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER OF CANADA 

ESTABLISHED 1907 PUBLISHED TWICE MONTHLY 



Vol. XVII PUBLICATION OFFICE: TORONTO, JANUARY 1, 1923 No. 1 



CONTENTS 

Receipts Marked "Paid" Are Taxed 13 

Recommend Revision of Business Tax 14 

Predict Big Building Year 15 

Coming to Lagerheads Over Bizness Expanshun 16-17 

Sewage Disposal System for Rural School 18-19 

Sanitary Conditions in Artisans' Homes 20 

Hanging Duct Patterns (continued) . 21 

Asks for Advocation of Passing on Sales Tax by Plumbers 22 

By-law Allowing Instalment Payment on Plumbing Needs 23 

Editorial Comment 24 

Profitable Field for Plumbers 25 

News Notes From Coast to Coast 26 

Letters to the Editor — The Melting Pot 27 

Use of Trade Acceptances is Misleading 28 

Survey of Current Markets — Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 29-36 



The MacLean Publishing Company, Ltd. 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN, President. H. T. HUNTER, Vice-President. 

H. V. TYRRELL, General Manager. 

Publishers of Sanitary Engineer. Hardware and Metal, The Financial Post, MaoLean's Magazine, 
Canadian Grocer, Dry Goods Review, Men's Wear Review, Canadian Printer and Publisher, 
Bookseller and Stationer, Canadian Machinery and Manufacturing News, Power House, Canadian 
Foundryman. Canadian Shipping and Marine Engineering News, Canadian Automotive Trade 

Journal, Druggists' Weekly 
Cable Address: Macpubco, Toronto: Atabek London, Eng. 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter of Canada 

Published on the First and Fifteenth of Each Month 

Office of Publication: 143-153 University Avenue, Toronto, Canada 
GEO. D. DAVIS, Manager. 
NORTON W. KINGSLAND. Advertising Manager 

H. L. SOUTHALL, Managing Editor. N. A. KEARNS, Contributing editor. 

B. C. CULLEY, Associate Editor. O. W. KOTHE, Contributing Editor. 

W. C. DOVER, Associate Editor. B. E. T. ELLIS, Contributing Editor. 

CHIEF OFFICES- 

CANADA— Montreal, Southam Bldg., 128 Bleury St., Phone Plateau 946. Toronto, 143-153 University Ave., Tele- 
phone Adel. 5740 ; Winnipeg, 810 Confederation Life Bldg., Telephone A. 3773. 

GREAT BRITAIN— London, The MacLean Company of Great Britain. Limited, 88 Fleet Street, E.G., E. J. Dodd, 
Director, Telephone Central 12960. Cable Address: Atabek, London, England. 

UNITED STATES— New York, L. H. Meyer, 1606 St. James Bldg., 1133 Broadway, Telephone Watkins 5869 ; Boston, 
C. L. Morton, Room 734, Old South Buildings, Telephone Main 1024; Chicago, 405-6 Transportation Bldg., 608 
So. Dearborn St., Wabash 9430. 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE— Canada, $2.00 a year; Great Britain, South Africa, and West Indies, 8s. 6d- a year; 
United States. $2.50 a year; other countries, $3.00 a year. Single copies, 10 cents. Invariably in advance. 



12 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



January L, 1923 





One Man 
Does the Work of Two 



Why This Threading 
Tool is Better 



"Toledo" Geared Adjustable 
Threading Tool, No. 2'/ 2 ; capacity, 
2'/2 to 6 in., inclusive; weight, 120 
lbs 

In operation the cutters open out to cut the tapered thread. 
The dies cut only with the mouth of the cutter. Lead screw 
insures perfect pitch and form of thread. The machines are 
light and compact, have a minimum of working parts, strong 
and durable. All threads W to 12" are threaded at one cut 
and by one man. 

Made in Canada Leading Supply Houses will quote You 



Try Jardine or Toledo First 

A. B. Jardine & Co., 



Winnipeg and West: 
STANLEY BROCK. LTD.. 

Winnipeg-, Man., Calgary, Alta 
Vancouver, British Columbia. 



Limited 

HESPELER, ONT. 



Broekvil'e and East: 
J. R. DEVEREAUX tt CO., 

New Birks Bldi?.. Montreal. Que. 



Ontario. West of Brockvllle: W. H. CUNNINGHAM & HILL, 269 Richmond St. West, Toronto, Ontario. 



Name 



Mail this coupon for a Catalogue. 



Address 



Sanitary Engineer 




Boiler 
cement 



C&K 



Uaks in hot* 30 

^" a O ANDPOTWICX™' 




A New "C & H" Product 

C. & H. Boiler cement for repairing leaks in 
Boilers and heating systems. Poured into the 
boiler it mixes instantly with the hot water and is 
carried through the system. As soon as it reaches 
the leak and strikes the air it congeals and makes 
a permanent repair — water-tight and steam tight 
to a pressure of 500 pounds. 

Saves time and money — does not evaporate or 
lose its efficiency with age. No Bad Odor — abso- 
lutely harmless. 

And The Price Is Right 



Quarts $2.40. 

Case lots, 12 qts. $2.00. 



Gallons, $8.40 ea. 

Case lots, 6 gals., $7.00 ea. 



Jobbers get our gross price. 



W. H. Cunningham & Hill Ltd. 

Plumbing and Heating Specialties 



269 West Richmond St. 



Toronto, Canada 



Established 
1907 

Circulates 
Throughout 
Canada 



VOL. XVII. 





IMF 



Plumber and Steam fitter of Canada 



TORONTO, JANUARY 1, 1923 



Published 
First 
and 
Fifteenth 
of Month 



N0..1 



Tax Counter Checks Marked "Paid" 

Customs and Excise Official Points out Some Technicalities in 
Receipt Tax Regulations — Cash Register Manufacturer Advises 
Striking Words "This is a Receipt" off Printing Machinery — 
Would Not Use Post Cards for Receipts 



MANY QUESTIONS are likely to be raised by the trade 
in connection with the application of the receipt tax. 
effective from January 1, 1923. While some of the regu- 
lations are sufficiently clear, there are others which may be 
misconstrued. Discussing the subject with an official of the 
Toronto Department of Customs and Excise and some manu- 
facturers, Sanitary Engineer secured some information 
which may assist in dealing with this subject, though no de- 
tailed rulings have been issued as yet and it is stated that 
none are likely to be issued from Ottawa until after the re- 
ceipt tax has been made effective and specific complaints are 
brought to the attention of the authorities. 

The chief division of opinion seems to be in connection with 
the provision which states "Counter sales slips and cash regis- 
ter tickets are not taxable, provided no words implying or 
stating acknowledgment of the receipt or the payment of 
money appear thereon." Some retailers have enquired if a 
cash register slip or counter check showing the amount in- 
volved is to be classed as a receipt for taxation purposes. A. 
E. McLean, sales manager of the National Cash Register Co., 
Toronto branch, stated to Sanitary Engineer that on a great 
many cash register slips the words are printed, "This is 
a receipt." With these words the cash register check consti- 
tutes a receipt and is, therefore, subject to tax on amounts of 
$10 and over. In this connection, Mr. McLean stated: "We 
will have these words eliminated on new machines. Mer- 
chants are well advised to have this change made in their 
machines at once, as it is an easy operation and will save them 
much trouble. Some of the large department stores have al- 
ready done so, anticipating that the check handed out from 
the cash register with these words on it would be subject to 
tax." 

The official of the Department of Customs and Excise con- 
firmed the foregoing concerning cash register slips. He gave 
it as his opinion that where a counter check is issued and the 
merchant marks the word "paid" on it that it constitutes a 
receipt and is subject to tax. It was pointed out that fre- 
quently merchants used the word "paid" on such checks and 
sometimes followed it with their initials. It was not thought 
that this would be a serious tax insofar as counter sales were 
concerned because very few customers asked for a signed re- 
ceipt on a cash sale. Where it would be felt more would be 
on C 0. D. orders. Discussing this angle of the subject, it was 
pointed out that while the customer purchasing goods and 
paying cash over the counter would not necessarily require a 
signed receipt, that the customer ordering goods over the 
telephone on a C 0. D. basis would rather hesitate to pay any 



considerable sum of money to a delivery boy without receiving 
a receipt which would be an adequate acknowledgment of the 
money paid. The possession of the parcel might be taken as 
sufficient evidence of the money paid in some cases but it 
would constitute a practice which would be open to abuse. Of 
course, the customer could be accorded the alternative of 
running an account for such orders, but this is undesirable to 
retailers. Generally speaking, it was thought the tendency 
would be for retailers to encourage more cash business so as 
to keep down the number of accounts over $10 and to eliminate 
as many C. 0. D. orders as possible so as to keep down the 
number of tax stamps they would be compelled to use. 

It was the opinion of this official that the ordinary counter 
check showing goods purchased and amount, but not marked 
"paid" or bearing any other words implying a receipt, would 
not require to bear a tax stamp. 

It was pointed out by this official that a cheque may not be 
shown to be in settlement of an account and, therefore, a 
signed receipt may be required by the debtor even though a 
cheque is used. The fact that a cheque may not be classed 
technically as a "receipt" also raises the possibility of certain 
debtors who pay by cheque requiring a signed receipt which 
is taxable. 

Another practice which comes under the new regulations is 
the use of transfer cards in large stores. Certain department 
stores make use of such a card on which a number of small 
purchases are entered in various departments and payment 
made by the customer in a lump sum at the end of the shop- 
ping tour. This card is now stamped "paid" when the cash 
oi' a cheque is tendered and would ordinarily come under the 
regulations requiring it to be taxed when of $10 or over. 

Each signature of an employee on a pay roll being a re- 
ceipt is taxable for each signature covering an amount of $10 
and over. Some of the large firms put salaries on deposit for 
employees in a bank and the employees put a tax stamp on 
withdrawal orders. In certain other cases two or three of- 
ficials of the firm are on hand when the staff is being paid and 
no receipt is asked for from the employees. 

Individual freight bills and periodical statements of same, 
acknowledging receipt of payment are taxable. An enquiry 
has been made if this includes "way-bills" which the railway 
freight handler signs in acknowledgment of the freight and 
which may bear record of freight classification and rate ap- 
plying. It was pointed out that, while details of classification 
and rate chargeable may appear on the bill, the receipt con- 
veyed by the signature of the freight handler is merely cover- 



14 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter January 1, 1923 



ing the merchandise, and is not taxable. 
The periodic statements of account is- 
sued to collect freight charges and re- 
ceipted in the ordinary way are the ones 
which are taxable. 

There is some division of opinion con- 
cerning the provision covering receipts 
in the form of letters forwarded by mail 
being taxable. Letters in an envelope 
must carry stamps which include re- 
venue under the War Revenue Act so 
that tax is paid in that form. Asked 
as to whether or not postcards would 
come into use for the purpose, bearing 
only one cent postage, this official 



thought it unlikely that any firms would 
care to show receipts so publicly. 

Favors Mail Order 

The provisions exempt remitter's coun- 
terfoil, being part of a taxable express 
money order. This counterfoil is the 
acknowledgment received for money 
paid for money order. It is suggested 
that in connection with mail order 
business where cash is paid in advance 
for merchandise and where such cash 
is generally forwarded by money order, 
that the customer has a receipt for 



money paid without requiring the mail 
order firm to give it. To secure a re- 
ceipt for money paid to the local mer- 
chant either by cash or cheque, a se- 
cond tax applies. 

E. M. Trowern, Dominion Secretary 
R. M. A., states that the intention of 
the government is evidently to exempt 
cash register checks and counter slips 
in cash transactions. He states that 
the provisions might mean that all 
cash register slips and counter checks 
are not exempt, but he is of the definite 
opinion that the retailer may Hot feel 
any concern in regard to such taxes. 



Would Revise Business Income Tax 

Proposals of Joint Conference on Taxation Understood to Include 
Recommendation that Business Income Tax be Put on Same Basis 
as Personal Income Tax — Exclude Gifts to Charities, Etc. — 
Recommend Flat Tax on Cheques of Two Cents 



DISCUSSING the proposals of the 
joint conference on taxation which 
since being outlined in a pre- 
vious issue of Sanitary Engineer have 
been put before various manufacturing, 
wholesale and retail associations, some 
better idea of probable final meaning of 
the recommendations has been gleaned. 
A group of resolutions was passed unan- 
imously at that conference with the un- 
derstanding that these were to be refer- 
red back to the national organizations 
concerned and that a second conference 
of representatives of these organizations 
would be held in Ottawa in January to 
put the resolutions in final form before 
the government. 

It is understood that it is designed to 
make up any loss of revenue brought 
about by following out the recommenda- 
tions, by reducing government expendi- 
tures and by slightly increasing the 
sales tax if necessary; that purchasers 
are to be furnished with invoices on 
which the amount of such sales tax to 
at least the extent of 2% per cent, must 
be shown; that the regular rates of 
Sales Tax should apply to all purchases 
by or on behalf of the government. This 
policy is followed in connection with im- 
port duties and it is planned to make no 
exception under the Sales Tax. 

Will Determine Status of Trade 

Some discussion has also taken place 
concerning difficulties arising in con- 
nection with the value on which Sales 
Tax is assessed and as to the status of 
various branches of trade such as tin- 
smiths, harnessmakers, etc. Under the 
suggested regulations, it is understood 
that the M'nister would be given power 
to determine the status of the individual 
or firm, subject to appeal to higher au- 
thorities. The recommendations of trade 
organizations on the subject are to be 



considered in connection with such ap- 
peals. It is also understood that im- 
porters who sell in this country under 
exclusive selling rights should be class- 
ed for Sales Tax purposes as wholesal- 
ers in respect to importations and sales 
in Canada, under the proposal. 

The proposal in connection with the 
status of certain branches of the trade 
such as tinsmiths, provides that those 
who produce goods which they wholly 
retail from stock over the counter in the 
premises where they are produced, to 
consumers, shall be compelled to collect 
sales tax on such manufactured goods if 
their turnover in such goods exceeds in 
value a set amount to be agreed upon by 
the organization which represents their 
interests. The proposals also include 
a clause, it is said, which provides that 
sales tax shall not apply on sales by re- 
tailers who manufacture or produce ar- 
ticles made to the order of individual 
customers and sold over the counter or 
in the premises where they were made 
direct to such individual customers. 

Two-Gent Stamp on All Cheques 

The proposal re the Stamp Tax on 
cheques was originally two cents on all 
cheques, drafts, bills of exchange or 
promissory notes, up to and including 
one hundred dollars and a flat rate of 
four cents for higher amounts. It is un- 
derstood the manufacturers favor the 
further amendment of this proposal so 
that there will be but a flat rate of two 
cents on each cheque irrespective of 
amount. 

It is understood the income tax on 
corporations also came in for some con- 
sideration, and that the suggestion was 
made that the normal tax of 10V 2 per 
cent, on the income of corporations ex- 
ceeding $2,000 per annum be reduced to 



the present rate applying to individuals 
of 4 per cent, on incomes up to $6,000 
and 8 per cent, on all incomes over that 
amount without any surtaxes. It was also 
understood to be a recommendation that 
net loss from business for any taxable 
year be deducted from the net income of 
the succeeding year and that any unab- 
solved balance be a deduction from the 
net income of the next succeeding 
year. Income Taxes payable to 
other authorities such as pro- 
vincial or municipal governments should 
be counted as an expense of doing busi- 
ness and deducted from the taxable 
amount as well, according to the recom- 
mendations. The deduction of gifts to 
charities totalling not more than 15 per 
cent, of the taxpayers' net income should 
also be deducted from taxable income 
according to the proposals. The same 
provision would be applied to personal 
income tax and also including deductions 
of life insurance premiums not exceed- 
ing 5 per cent, of net income. Sugges- 
tions for simplifying the method «f com- 
puting the tax are also made. Repeal 
is also suggested of the tax of 5 per cent, 
on premiums paid to unlicensed insur- 
ance companies. 

The proposed amendment of the paint 
manufacturers, as outlined in a recent 
issue of Sanitary Engineer, would be 
inserted in place of the provision that 
the purchaser be furnished with written 
invoice which shall state separately the 
amount of tax to at least the extent of 
2% per cent. The suggested amend- 
ment of certain manufacturers pro- 
vides that no absorption of any part of 
the tax be allowed, that the sale from 
manufacturer to wholesaler be exempted 
from taxat : on and that the sale from 
either manufacturer or wholesaler to re- 
tailer be subject to the full Sales Tax of 
4% per cent. 



January 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 15 



[Predict Big Building Year In 1923 

Much Residential Building Required to Keep Pace With Natural 
Increase in Population — Prices Appear to be Fairly Stable for 
Early Part of Next Year — Pipe Deliveries May be Slow 



MANUFACTURERS discussing 
tne business outlook for 1923 in 
plumbing and heating supplies 
give soms information of value to the 
trade in planning for next year. 

L. H. Ivey, Empire Brass Mfg. Co., Ltd., 
London, Ont., states that the past year 
has been a fairly good one for resi- 
dential building. 

♦ "There has not been industrial build- 
ing to any great extent, and we are look- 
ing forward to about the same condi- 
tions during the year 1923 a s industrial 
building will not reach any large extent 
until there is a bigger increase in immi- 
gration into the country," says Mr. Ivey. 

"Figures, however, show that the 
natural increase in residential building 
during the war years and after, was 
never maintained, so that we still think 
there is a great deal of residential build- 
ing to be done in the country to take 
care of the natural increase. 

"We feel that there is an exceptional- 
ly good field for business in the rural 
districts where the farmer is wakening 
up to the fact that he can have at a 
fairly moderate cost the conveniences 
of the city resident, and with a little con- 
centrated work on the part of the manu- 
facturer, the jobber and the sanitary en- 
gineer, this business could be made more 
extensive. 

"In regard to prices. Indications are 
that the price of labor for the time be- 
ing is at least stationary. The advance 
in the rate of wages made of their own 
free will by the steel companies in the 
United States, indicates that no further 
reductions are to take place so that, if 
anything, an advance in prices can be 
looked for during 1923 instead of a fur- 
ther reduction. We personally feel that 
generally business in 1923 will exceed 
that of 1922." 

Much Building to be Done 

C A. Lusby, Amherst Foundry Co. 
Ltd., states: — 

"We have found some improvement 
in business during th« past few months 
and we think that the prospects for the 
coming year are better than they have 
been for some time during the past. 
There must certainly be a considerable 
volume of building business during 1923 
which has a direct bearing on the line of 
business in which we are interested. 

"In regard to the stability of prices, 
it is rather difficult to make predictions 
as a great many articles, especially in 
the line of metals, are showing a tenden- 
cy to increase in price at the same time. 
We think, however, that there will not 



be any very great fluctuation in prices 
during 1923." 

J. 0. Thorn, General Manager, The 
Metallic Roofing Co., of Canada Ltd., 
manufacturers of sheet metal building 
materails, states: — 

"Prices of raw material and manufac- 
tured goods in our line are as low as it 
is possible to make bhem, under existing 
conditions. Owing to a variety of rea- 
sons raw material has been difficult to 
obtain, and in our opinion customers will 
be well advised to book now for their' 
requirements during at least the first 
quarter of the new year." 

Price Trend Stable 

J. M. Gunn, Ass't. General Manager 
McClary Mfg. Co., London, states: — 

"The basic raw materials of our indus- 
try consist of sheet iron, both black and 
galvanized, pig iron, copper, spelter, tin, 
and tin plates. It was expected that 
there would be a general decline in val- 
ues during 1922, towards pre-war prices, 
but on the other hand there has been 
a general advance, though not a large 
one; and we have not advanced our man- 
ufactured goods to correspond with 
these increased values. It is quite pos- 
sible that this will have to be done in 
the near future. The reason for this sec- 
ondary inflation is the increased cost, 
occasioned by the scarcity of coal, and 
railway troubles, owing to the refusal 
of the miners and operators to take 
the'r share of the liquidation which is 
going on. 

"During the year our trade was in- 
creased in volume considerably, but the 
value was not very much greater than 
the year before, owing to the lower 



WHY A TINSMITH IS A MANU- 
FACTURER FOR TAXATION 
PURPOSES 

Tinsmiths have long wondered 
why they were classed as manu- 
facturers, for taxation purposes, 
while blasksmiths, merchant tailors 
and others producing certain art- 
icles were classed as retailers. 

The reason, as outlined in the 
resolutions being considered now, 
is that tinsmiths and confectioners' 
produce something which can be 
sold in the ordinary retail way to 
practically anyone, whereas' the 
product of a blacksmith or tailor 
is to special order and could not be 
sold in ordinary retail trade. 



prices, and it was done at a narrowing 
margin of profit. It is hard to say how 
long the present conditions will prevail 
but there is not likely to be much change 
during the first quarter of the year. An 
advance is predicted in some lines of 
raw materials which will certainly af- 
fect our costs, but if an amicable settle- 
ment is made with the labor elements 
above referred to, this anticipated ad- 
vance may be avoided." 

Pipe Deliveries Slow 

H. Rooke, Page-Hersey Tubes Ltd., 
Toronto, manufacturers of steel and 
wrought iron pipe, states: — 

"In the tubular trade, the year just 
closing was marked by a very heavy de- 
mand for small sizes of black and gal- 
vanized pipe, due to what might be term- 
ed, "the building boom in Eastern Can- 
ada," principally in Ontario and Quebec. 
The opposite has been the situation in re- 
spect to larger sizes of pipe, 3 in. and up, 
due to the few buildings of large size, 
under construction, and because there 
was no development to any extent in the 
industries. Manufacturers of tubular 
products have been hampered very ser- 
iously, in fact, plants have been closed 
down, due to lack of raw mater al, caus- 
ed by the coal strike and the railroad 
situation in the United States in addi- 
tion to which they have also had a 
heavy demand for steel products, both 
home and abroad. 

"Notwithstanding this, the price of 
tubular products has not changed mater- 
ially, from the low point of 1921, the ad- 
vance only being $6.00 per ton, hence in 
this line, the experience of rapidly rising 
costs, has not affected work, as was the 
case two years ago. 

"It is, of course, likely that the volume 
of business in Canada, will be reduced 
during the mid-winter and inventory per- 
iods, but, due to short supplies, it is mot 
expected that mills will be able to ac- 
cumulate stocks, to any extent, and the 
probability is that deliveries will be 
slow during the early part of 1923 and 
prices continue firm." 

Stimulate Buying Market 
W. R. Gibson, General Manager, Gnr- 
ney Foundry Co. Ltd., Toronto, manufac- 
turers of heating appliances, states: — 
"If manufacturing costs are regarded 
as a basis of price for 1923, there should 
be a decided stiffening of price, although 
some softness may result in the early 
part of the year because many manufac- 
turers lack the nerve to get the prices 
that their costs demand. 

(Continued on page 20) 



L6 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter January l, 1923 




"Coming to Logerheds 
Over Bizness Expanshun" 

(With apoloqies to Rinq W^Lardner) 
r 8Y 



Major L.L. Anthes 

Managing Director -Anthes Foundry Ltd. 



Terraboone, Dec. 29 

Dear Friend A1-- 



IHOPE you reed, that nektie I sent you for 
Xmas. I showed it to sum of the boys in the 
shop and they sed it was a reglar nockout. I 
sez to them nothins too good for my Old Side Kick 
Al and I aint goin to tell you how much I pade for 
it for I dont bleeve in lookin gift horses in the 
mouths — you know me Al. 

Wen I showed it to Vilet she said it maid her 
dizzy to look at it the colors was so strikin. She 
said you could either ware it on the Seventeenth 
of March or the Twelfth of July and keep em all 
guessin without given afence. Thats a hole lot of 
praze comin from Vilet. 

Ime goin to tell you how me and Bill the fore- 
man my partner neerly came to logerheds over a 
question of what he called "bizness expanshun." 
You know how it is in the big leagues Al. Wen 
the season is over you bust up till the next spring. 
Theres a lot of that "Old lang sine" stuff and the 
usual fairwell greetings such as "sorry to meat, 
happy to part," and etc. But when you get into 
reel bizness you got to keep movin the hole year 
round or your not libel to finnish the seazon. 
Haven played baseball so long I wasnt wize to 
these conditions. An when things begin to slack 
off I was enclined to hit the eezy chare. But not 
Bill. He had somethin up his sleave and when he 
sprang it that was when' we had the argument. 

"Ever here of skeptic tanx?" he sez to me one 
day as I set in the offis goin over the battin aver- 
ages of them fellers what calls theirselves majer 
league hitters when they never half bean up be- 
fore a reel live pitcher like what we usta half when 
baseball was in its zeneith. 

"Skeptic Tanx," sez I, thinkin he was referrin to 
some brand of booze-fighter. "No whats they?" 

"Well there used for rurial sewage dispozle," he 
explnd. "Where a town aint got a trunk sewer 



and sewage dispozle system you put in individial 
skeptic tanx and a dispozle field and nature does 
the rest." 

"What kinda squerl whiskey you been drinkin?" 
I asts him. "Were jew get this rurial dispozle 
skeptic, field tanx bizness? Come down to earth 
and tell us what its all about." 

"Well," sez he, "its like this. Theirs a tank 
concisting of 2 chambers. The discharge from the 
house drain enters the first chamber and undergoes 
a process of dissalushun threw the action of Annie 
Robic Bakteeria, then it — " 

"Back up — back up — wot the h — " (Then I 
seen Vilet lookin my way and changed my questn.). 
"Annie who?" sez I. 

"Annie Robic," sez he. 

"Well wot doz Annie do?" I asks thinkin he was 
goin nuts. 

"If you lissen He tell you," he sez irratated like. 
"The solids is broken down by Annie Robic Bak- 
teria — " 

"I thought you said her name was Annie Robic 
— now you say its Bakteria — was she married 
twice." 

"You dont get me" he sez. 

"That's the best little guess you ever maid" I 
came back at him. 

"Well lissen till Ime threw," he sez, "and then 
you can ask questns." 

So I set back in my chair and lissened wundring 
what it was all about. 

"After the solids is broken up they overflow into 
the doseing chaimber — " 

"Is a doseing chaimber a sick-room?" I asks in- 
nicent like. 

"See hear," he sez, beginning to get soar, "Jew 
wanta lissen to what I gotta say or jew think you 
no enuff?" 

"All rite fire away," I sez. When Bill begins to 
get sourcastic its time to close up. "Sorry I in- 
trupted — I'll lissen to the bitter end." 



January 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 17 



"You maid me lose the thread," he growled. 
"Will a peace of string do" I asts, but he looks 
so mad that I closed my trap and kep it closed. 
"Where was I," he asts. 

"In the first chamber with Annie Robic," I in- 
forms him. 

"Oh, yes," he sez. "Well after the solids is 
broken up by Annie Robic Bakteria, they overflow 
into the doseing 
chamber. When 
the affluvii gets to 
a certain hite — " 

"The what?" I 
sez, fergettin my- 
self. 

' "The affluvia" 
he skowles, "the 
liquid what over- 
flows from the 
first chaimber. 
When it gets to a 
sertain hite it is 
discharged into the 
dispozle field 
which is a lot of 
tile of about 18" 
under the ground." 

"Who discharges 
it," I ast him. 

"Why A. Sifen 
discharges it when 
it gets to a certain 
hite." 

"How does A. 
Sifen no when its 
high enuff?" 

Bill looked so 
discusted like he 
wood of et me. 

"A. Sifen dis- 
charges the affluv- 
ia automatickly." 

"Oh I see" I sez, 
not seen at all. 



"Skeptic 7 anx," says /, thinking 

booze 



'A. Sifen has a automatick and 
discharges affluvia insted of bullets." 

Bill looked like he wanted to kill me. "Your 
hopeless," he sez. 

"Oh Ime not so cuckoo as you think," I retali- 
ates with ferver. "Wot makes A. Sifen discharge 
automatik affluvia, thats what I want to know," I 
sez, tryin to look wize. 

"Atmusfeerik Presher," he says. 
"But wot regelates Atmusfeerick Presher?" I 
came back at him. 

"Nothin does," he balled. "Atmusfeerik Presh- 
er is constant." 

"Wnoz Q Atmosfeerik Presher constant to — 
Annie Robic?" 



I thot Bill ud choak, he looked so mad. 
"When your threw astin damphool questns." he 
sez, "He perseed. I want to show you how we kin 
get knew bizness but you wont take it seryous." 

"Now look hear Bill" I sez tryin to molufy him. 
"Ime just as kean as you to boost bizness, but when 
you interdooce me to Annie Robic in the 1st 
chaimber an then Atmosfeerik Presher shoots out 

automatick af- 
fluvia out of the 
2nd chaimber I 
really thinks you 
ought to half youre 
hed red." 

"Oh thats youre 
apinion is it," he 
sez with a snear. 
"Well youve gotta 
lot to lern." 

"Shoot away old 
Bean," I sez, "Ime 
injoyin it if you 
are. What hap- 
pens after the af- 
fluvia shoots out 
into the automa- 
tik dispozle field." 

"It filters threw 
the open joints of 
the tile in the dis- 
pozle field." 

"Then what 
happens?" 

"It is purified by 
the son and heir 
and A. Robic Bak- 
teria." 

"You mean An- 
nie Robick Bak- 
teria," I sez think- 
in I was puttin one 
he Was referring to some brand of over him. 

fe hler - "No I dont" he 

shouts. 

"Didnt you say A. Robic Bakteria," I asts. 
"Yes I did," he returns. 

"Well dozent A. stand for Annie," I asts tryin 
to look hurt. 

"Oh h — 1," he sez, "I dont sea how I stand for 
you," and with that he gets up and busts outa the 
shop slamming the door after him. 

"Well some peepols got me beet," I coments, as 
he hikes it akross the streat as if he was in a hurry 
to go somewhear. 

"Oh is that so," I hears a ladys voice behind me, 
"When did you begin to tumble to yerself?" 

It was Vilet and I begins right off to feal uneezy. 
(Continued on page 36) 




18 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



January I, 1923 



Sewage Disposal for a Rural School 

First of a Series of Plans and Specifications of Sewage Disposal 
Systems That Have Been Prepared, Laid Out and Adopted by 
Authorities — Sewage Disposal in Rural School With 400 Pupils 

Written for Sanitary Engineer by EDWIN NEWSOME, Consulting Sanitary and Heating Engineer 



IT IS estimated by some of the great- 
est statisticians that rural, as well 
as city school problems are becom- 
ing more important to the sanitary en- 
gineer, because such institutions as 
schools require to be fitted up with mod- 
ern sanitary conveniences. 

Various countries have put laws into 
effect that require all children to be 
given a public school education until they 
reach the age of 16 years. This law 
it is said, is responsible for a lot of 
schools having to either be enlarged or 
new ones erected, and while no doubt 
such a conditions adds in more ways 
than one to the financial burden of the 



public school boards in incorporated 
towns and cities where sewerage sys- 
tems and public sewers are available, 
the problems of the rural school boards 
and trustees are still more serious, be- 
cause special sewage disposal sytems 
have to be laid out and designed, and al- 
most every school requires a system best 
suited for prevailing conditions, as well 
as to meet the financial situation of 
each locality. 

Architects and sanitary engineers are 
being called upon to cope with these 
problems, and, realizing the position of 
many, who not having had very much 
experience along these lines, because of 



the fact that few such undertakings 

were required in years gone by, the San- 
itary Engineer is going to publish plans 
and specifications of sewage disposal 
systems that have been prepared, laid 
out and adopted by men who have giv- 
en this line of work a great deal of 
study and who also have laid out and 
designed many successful systems. 

The first sewage disposal system to 
be described in this series of articles is 
that designed for the school now under 
construction at Mount Dennis, Ontario, a 
suburb of Toronto. 

When the school is completed it will 
provide for the attendance of 400 pupils 





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SEWAGE D/SPOS/IL PL/1A/T 

MOUNT 0£A/m PUBL/C JCHOOL 



/V A /IGMSTfCHG CO. £/M/r&) 
7. AVAtf J7:S. 7-OOOAtTO 



January 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



19 



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at least. Modern plumbing and sani- 
tary fixtures will be installed and the 
basement will be drained. There will 
be separate boys' and girls' lavatories 
and small ones for teachers. 

The septic tank proper, which is a 
-double one, will partially treat 4,000 
gallons of sewage per day, and nearly 
8,000 lineal feet of four-inch field tile 
pipe will be laid underground for the 
absorption bed. N. A. Armstrong Co., 
Ltd., King St. East, Toronto, are the 
-architects and engineers. The whole 
-system is fairly well described in the 
accompanying illustrations, which are 
actual reproductions of the working 
drawings. 

Tanks are Built Down 

The tanks are built down in the 
ground so that wash basins, urinals and 
w. c.'s situated in the basement can be 
all connected in such a way as to dis- 
charge the soil and waste into the tanks. 
Ample ventilation is also provided, as 
the drawings and details show. 

The sewage flows direct into the culti- 
vating compartments and, when the 
anaerobic bacteiia has broken down the 
solids, the effluent overflows into the 
-dosing chamber. 

These latter chambers are emptied by 
•a vertical electric driven sewage lift 



pump. 3 h. p. discharging and lifting 
the sewage at the rate of 300 gallons 
per minute into a concrete distributing 
tank, from which the effluent flows into 
the thousands of lineal feet of field tile. 

This rate of discharge has been pro- 
vided so as to insure an equal dis- 
tribution of sewage into the whole of 
the system of laterals as shown. 

Operation of Sewage Pump 

The sewage pump is operated by an 
automatic switch, connected to a vertical 
rod at the lower end of which is fitted 
a large copper float; when the ef- 
fluent in the dosing chamber has reach- 
ed a certain height, the float rises and 
throws in the electric switch, starting 
the motor. The motor is also a ver- 
tical type A. C. directly connected to a 
vertical shaft operating the centrifugal 
pump. 

The size of the septic tank is determ- 
ined by the number of pupils and teach- 
ers attending the school and the amount 
of water used in the operating of the 
whole school, viz.: Water used in the 
w. c's. (the amount per flush predeterm- 
ined). The urinale are fitted with 
automatic flushing tanks set to discharge 
a given amount at pre-arranged inter- 
vals. A certain amount of water is 
provided for cleaning the school, for 



drinking purposes as well as for the 
wash basins. 

Not one item has been overlooked arid 
every care has been exercised that will 
insure as perfect a disposal system as 
possible. 

T. B. Smythe, sanitary and heating 
contractor, Toronto, has the job of in- 
stalling this system as well as fitting 
the school up with all the sanitary fix- 
tures, and, if previous work done by 
Mr. Smythe and his staff is to be taken 
as a basis upon which to judge, this job 
when completed, the writer believes that 
the school board will be given excellent 
work throughout. 

How Sizes are Figured 

When a sewage disposal system is be- 
ing designed for any kind of building, 
there must be certain conditions given 
very careful attention. For example, 
the kind of ground, the area available, 
the number of pupils (if a school), the 
water supply in all cases, the kind of 
fixtures to be used, how the fixtures are 
to be flushed, or whether some of these 
are flushed periodically or continuously. 

Suppose that the urinals are to be 
furnished with running water, then the 
quantity passing through the valves or 
nozzles will have to be predetermined or 
if these fixtures are to be flushed at 



20 



intervals, the number of intervals per 
day and the quantity per flush. 

The w. c.'s will have to be flushed 
either by low down tank valves and ball- 
cocks or by automatic flushing valves 
and the quantity of water to be used 
must be predetermined before the size 
of septic tank can be decided upon. Then 
after all these details have been determ- 
ined, the work of arriving at sizes can 
be gone on with, as well as an allow- 
ance made for cleaning the school, and 
the probable quantity used at the wash 
basins. 

Type or Source of Water Supply 
Available 

When water is procured from a pri- 
vate source, such as well, lake, river or 
stream, and the water is pumped into 
pneumatic pressure tanks, water is used 
more sparingly than is the case where 
a public water supply is available. In 
the case of this school, water is pro- 
cured from the city of Toronto water 
works and ample water allowance is 
therefore provided. Each w. c. is to be 
furnished with flush valves set to dis- 
charge (3V 2 ) three and one half gallons 
per operation. The urinals will be fit- 
ted with automatic flushing tanks; two 
gallons of water per pupil is furnished 
for the purpose of school cleaning. The 
balance of ten gallons per pupil per 
day is used for urinals and wash basins. 

LCcation of Septic Tank 

When plumbing fixtures are installed 
on the ground floor and basements do 
not require to be washed and drained 
into the septic tanks such tanks can be 
built close to the surface of the ground. 
But in this case, plumbing fixtures are 
placed in the basement and the soil and 
waste must therefore flow by gravity 
into the septic tanks, which are built 
at some depth down as shown in the 
illustrations herewith. The effluent 
flowing from the cultivating, or septic 
tanks into the dosing chamber must 
therefore be raised by the vertical pump 
because it is necessary to discharge such 
effluent into open field tile pipe laid 
about (18) eighteen inches below the 
surface of the ground, a position where 
most of the friendly germs are always 
to be found. 

The pump, discharging the sewage at 
the rate of 300 gallons per hour, will 
only operate once in twenty-four hours, 
giving ample time to allow the effective 
breaking down of the solids in the culti- 
vating chamber, and the further set- 
tling of the effluent. The dosing chamber 
will be emptied in about thirteen or 
fourteen minutes from the time the 
motor starts. This high rate is neces- 
sary so as to make sure that all the field 
tile pipes will be filled with sewage and 
• ample time given to allow the sewage to 
be absorbed by the ground. 



9 



" Consult your Plumber more and you'll 
consult your doctor less." 
Foregoing has been suggested as a good slogan 
for plumbers to adopt in their advertising and 
showroom displays. 

ELECTRICITY KEEPS SWIMMING 
POOL WATER SANITARY 

F. E. Hartman, a chemist, has written 
a booklet on "The Purification of Water 
for Swimming Pools," in which he says 
that the methods commonly employed 
in the art of water purification are fil- 
tration, chlorination, actinic rays and 
ozonation. The use of actinic rays, or 
as it is more generally known, ultra- 
violet light has been practiced since 
1900 when De Mare employed it to puri- 
fy the water at Marseilles. It was 
found that ultra-violet rays could be 
used for the destruction of micro-organ- 
isms in water. 

For the Madison Square pool, New 
York, water is taken from the street 
mains, passed through a filter bed of 
broken stone, sand and gravel in huge 
steel cylinders; from the cylinders the 
water goes through the ultra-violet ray 
sterilizer; from the sterilizer into the 
pool through 30 inlets around the edge 
of the tank. The used water flows 
through outlets at the bottom of the 
diving pit to a point where it joins 
fresh water flowing in from the city 
mains, then all of it goes to the filters 
and on through the sterilizers. This 
continual circulation of the water is 
carried on by two motor-driven pumps. 



PREDICTS BIG BUILDING YEAR 

(Continued from page 15) 
"Iron, coal, coke, steel, copper, and 
the many other necessary supplies will 
be affected by the increasing volume of 
business and their cost will influence up- 
ward the price of manufactured goods. 

"Labor is not likely to be any lower 
in cost as even now the fact appears 
that demands are already being formu- 
lated for higher wages, and if efficiency 
drops, as it usually does when unemploy- 
ment diminishes, then this item of cost 
will also increase. 

"My experience would indicate that 
the retail business man's policy should 
be to use every endeavor to stimulate 
the buying market in his local district 
and then should buy conservatively and 
steadily to fit his requirements. Then if 
the policy of collecting promptly and 
closely, and paying his own accounts 
punctually is followed, he is almost cer- 
tain to have a very satisfactory result 
for the year 1923." 



Sanitary Conditions 
in Artisans' Homes 

A comprehensive report has been pre- 
pared upon artisans' homes in the City 
of Hamilton, as the result of months of 
work by the inspectors of the local health 
department. Instructions for the mak- 
ing of the survey of homes were issued 
by Dr. James Roberts, M. H. A., some 
time ago. 

The results of the thousands of in- 
spections made are revealed in the ex- 
haustive tables as to each district which 
are included in the report. A summary 
is also included, which is as follows: 
Number of homes occupied by one 

family 4,148 

Number of homes occupied by two 

families 326 

Number of dwellings over stores, 

tenements 192 

Total of dwellings inspected .... 4 6 j6 

Defective sanitary fittings 1,504 

Defective eavestroughs, plaster, 

roofs 1,060 

Defective flooring 80 

Dampness and structural defects 117 

Dirty homes and cellars 504 

Dark rooms 133 

Dry earth closets or privy vaults 843 

"It will be noted," the report states, 
"that out of the 4,666 premises inspect- 
ed 1,840 or 40 per cent, were owned by 
the occupants of the same. The 4,666 
includes tenement houses, and rooms 
over stores. If these be excluded, it will 
be found that at least 50 per cent, of 
the artisans in this city are the owners 
of their homes." 

Of the homes inspected, 3,005 were re- 
ported in good sanitary condition, 1,237 
as fair, and 424 as bad. The lack of 
sanitary convenience indicated in the 
tables with a large number of homes, 
was owing to the fact that many houses 
in Homeside district were visited, and 
the city services have not yet been com- 
pletely installed. 

In homes where conditions were bad, 
notices have been served that improve- 
ments must be made. After the comple- 
tion of these improvements, the homes 
will be eligible for promotion to the 
"fair" or "good" class. 

The report deals with occupied dwell- 
ings only. Nevertheless, it is stated that 
the number of vacant houses suitable as 
artisans' dwellings is remarkably small. 
In the extreme east of the city, several 
houses had been erected consisting of a 
single room. 

"I have no hesitation in stating that 
there is a distinct evidence of the neces- 
sity of a large number of small habita- 
tions to be erected in the city," Mr. 
Thornley states toward the close of the 
report. 

The document is signed by W. M. 
Thornley, chief sanitary inspector. 



January 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



21 



Some Patterns for Hanging Ducts 

Written for Sanitary Engineer by O. W. Kothe, Principal. St. Louis 
Technical Institute, St. Louis, Missouri. 

(Continued from last issue) 




. . ■ ^ 






i. 


if, ' • ' i 




• y c > J 

^4 


i 



• if 



n& i. 



To&au . boct 

. . . L . ..,,^ 




Patterns For Hanging Ducts. 



IN FIGURE 1 we show how small 
ducts may be hung to a concrete 
beam by clamping a band around the 
duct and attaching to the beam by means 
of expansion bolts. This is done at inter- 
vals of every 4 feet or so, at least there 
are 2 hangers to an 8-foot length. Then 
at figure 2 we show how hangers are 
embedded in the concrete before setting. 
Then by means of additional straps, bent 
or twisted to suit conditions, several 
holes can be punched along which en- 
ables raising or lowering the duct to 
suit. Other times they can be ar- 
ranged as in figure 3, where they are 
expansion-bolted direct to the beam. Still 
at other times long rods are threaded 
and run directly through the floors to 
support wide ducts or several runs of 
ducts. These angles are anchored to 
the floor with extra long threads on the 
bottom, are attached to angle irons laid 
underneath the ducts. Then these rods 
can be screwed up, thereby raising or 
lowering the work as required to make 
it perfectly level and straight. 



In modern buildings where tile con- 
struction is used in the floors, these 
tiles are generally wedged, shaped and 
concreted in place. For such floors, 
and on small ducts as in figure 4, togigle 
bolts as at A are used. These are very 
serviceable for such work as they can be 
inserted in drilled holes, after which the 
wings will expand and enable tightening 
up. But for heavy ducts it is better to 
run a long bolt through the floor and 
anchor with a plate at the top, since that 
will make it safer and there is no liabil- 
ity of the tile pulling through as would 
be the case with a toggle bolt. 

Sometimes with extra wide ducts, a 
construction feature as in figure 5 is 
used. An angle is bolted to the top of 
duct at intervals, and hung over the 
flange of the I-beam, where considerable 
vibration would be met with, a bolt would 
be set. To prevent the bottom of duct 
from sagging or buckling, an angle is 
also stretched across and either angle 
iron sides or rods are provided for sup- 
ports. Vertical ducts on stacks are often 



joined together as at B and hooks for I- 
beams may be made as at figure 7. 
Many of these details must of course be 
adjusted to what a workman has to work 
with. At times it is convenient to make 
joints as in figure 8 at certain places but 
even at that, certain slip joints are of- 
ten designed to overcome this cumber- 
some joint. 



A BUSINESS EVOLUTION 

Forty publishers of morning news- 
papers met in Chicago a couple of weeks 
ago and formed an association to pro- 
mote the morning newspapeTs' inter- 
ests in competition with the evening 
newspaper as an advertising medium. 
The chief method by which they say they 
intend to accomplish this is through an- 
nouncements in the business newspapers 
of the United States — that is papers of 
the type of Sanitary Engineer. 

This is an interesting evolution — the 
recognition of the place and power of 
the specialized newspaper. 



22 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter January 1, 1923 



Asks That Sanitary Engineer Advocate 

Compulsory Passing on of Sales Tax 



IN a recent communication received 
by Sanitary Eng'neer, J. E. Casson, 
plumber, of Victoria, B. C, states, 
"I have subscribed for and read Sani- 
tary Engineer for about twelve years 
and always found it useful. The yearly 
subscription is well spent money." 

He goes on to state re the Sales Tax: 
"Why should the retailer have to pay for 
it all? A lot of attention is given to 
manufacturers' and wholesalers' difficul- 
ties but little about the retailer who has 
to pay it and who can least afford to do 
so. He is the one who has to face un- 
restricted competition to sell his goods 
and simply has to absorb this tax out 
■of his anticipated ( ? ) profits. Why 



should not he charge the Sales Tax di- 
rect to his customer as a separate item 
on this bill? Why should you not ad- 
vocate that the law be changed so as to 
make it compulsory for him to do so." 

In explanation to Mr. Casson, Sani- 
tary Engineer has worked diligently in 
the interests of the retailer in inspect 
to Sales Tax. The recommendation has 
been made that the Sales Tax be passed 
along to the consumer as the govern- 
ment has intended it to be, and the aver- 
age retailer finds his cost of doing busi- 
ness sufficiently high to-day without ab- 
sorbing any part of this tax. This if 
the practice which should be followed. 
It is infinitely better to pass this tax 



along as part of the price quoted than to 
show it separately on the invoice to 
the customer. The latter plan would 
bring oack the old objection to the Lux- 
ury Tax. If through competition in 
certain districts the retailer is unable to 
collect this tax the situation is similar 
to that of local price cutting and is be- 
yond the assistance of any outside or- 
ganization. The price cutting situ- 
ation generally rights itself in short 
order. 

INCORPORATIONS 
Hickey & Aubut Ltd., head office Mon- 
treal, capital $50,000 to manufacture 
furnaces, stoves, ranges, piping, san- 
itary apparatus, etc. 



Perfection Radiators Ltd., head office 
Montreal, capital $750,000 to manufao- 
lure and deal in radiators. 




Some advertising which may offer some helpful suggestions to others in the trade is shown above. Erskine, Smith & 
Co., Ottawa, advertise "Our Hobby is Good Work Only," which points out that the firm concentrates on plumbing 
and heating work, using best materials and honest workmanship. It slates "this is time to discard that zinc bath tub 
and let us install sanitary enameled ware." McKelvey & Birch, Ltd., Kingston, Ont., advertise gas water healers 
and stoves. The ad. by W. H. Thome Co., Ltd., St. John, N.B., is devoted to bathroom fixtures and reads "On 
the fixtures depends the attractiveness, convenience and completeness in the sanitary arrangement of the modern bath- 
room. Our complete line of fixtures is fully abreast of every requirement." Brousseau & Frere, Quebec City, adver- 
tise "For the plumbing, healing and radiation of your home or improvements to existing systems it will pay you to 
place your work with an experienced and resourceful firm." Under the heading, "A Shower for Health," Taylor 
Bros., Brantford, Ont., say, "Doctors say that the morning shower bath contributes in no small measure to one's health 
and immunity from colds and disease. Why not one of our showers in your bathroom ?" The ad. by Hamilion & 
Siott, Si. Thomas, Ont., points out the necessity of considering health first in planning sanitary installations. The ad. 
by R. Chestnut & Sons, Ltd., Fredericton, N.B., emphasizes the necessity of tight joints, showing that careful thread- 
ing and filling are features of the firm's pipe work which are distinct specialties. E. LaWrenson, Kingston, Ont., 
advertises the greater enjoyment which comes from home life where the best fixtures are in use. 



January 1, 1923 



23 






This view of a Toronto plumber's showroom indicates the attractive appearance which can be secured by devoting a 
little attention to the arrangement and furnishing of the display. Enameled ware in an extensive array is shown, with 
medicine cabinets, toilets, mirrors, etc., down one side and laundry tubs and fixtures along the other. The office is at 
the rear with special facilities for discussing business with prospects and making estimates. 



TELEPHONE AT BATHTUB, A NEW 
IDEA IN HOTELS 

For years hotels have been competing 
with one another to provide the ultimate 
in a guest's comfort. But it is only re- 
cently that anyone had enough imagin- 
ation to think of anything so sensible as 
a telephone extension in the bathroom. 
What is more annoying than to have to 
get out of the bathtub all dripping and' 
stand by a wall telephone? One hotel 
has two telephones in each room, one by 
the bathtub and the other on a stand by 
the head of the bed. Excellent places for 
phones, but think how long it took for 
hotel men, even hotel men with the best 
of intentions, to quit putting them on 
the wall where a guest can't even sit 
down. For that matter, it is not many 
years since phones in private homes 
were placed where one could talk and be 
comfortable all at once. 



SANDWICH COUNCIL PLANS BIG 
SEWER TO SERVE SOUTH- 
EASTERN SECTION 

Windsor, Ont. — The tender for" the 
laying of a sewer in the southeastern 
portion of the town of Sandwich was 
awarded to the firm of Merlo, Merlo & 
Ray, at a special meeting of the Sand- 
wich council. . The by-law authorizing 
the work was also passed, ami the sew- 
er will be started at once. The successful 
bid was $143 871, and the new sewer will 



supply Askin Boulevard, Partington 
Avenue, Craigh, Randolph streets and 
Rankin Avenue, and several other streets 
in the southeastern district. 

The plans of the new sewer provide 



for drainage for the section of the town 
bordered by the town limits on the east 
and on the south, and as far west as the 
Huron Line. This work will only be 
completed as required. 



By-law Which Allows Installment Payment 

of Sanitary Conveniences in Peterboro 

SANITARY ENGINEER has secured a copy of By-law No. 2,425 of the City 
of Peterborough, concerning the authorization of the Local Board of Health to 
install sanitary conveniences. This by-law reads as follows: 

PASSED THE 2nd DAY OF NOVEMBER, 1922. 

The Municipal Council of the Corporation of the City of Peterborough enacts 
as follows: 

1. Where the Local Board of Health of the City of Peterborough recommends 
to the Council that sanitary conveniences should be installed in any building, and 
is of the opinion that the owner of the premises is unable to pay the expense of 
the same at once, and where the said Board directs that the cost, including interest 
at six per centum on the deferred payments, be paid by the owner in equal suc- 
cessive annual payments extending over a period not exceeding five years and 
that such annual payment be added by the Clerk of the City of Peterborough to 
the collector's roll and collected in like manner as municipal taxes, the Council 
may, by resolution, install suitable sanitary conveniences at the expense of the 
owner as herein set forth and according to the Public Health Act, Chapter 218, 
R.S.O., 1914, and all amendments thereto and authorize the Treasurer of the City 
of Peterborough to pay the cost thereof on the order of the said Board. 

(Sgd;) W. H. TAYLOR, Mayor. 

(Sgd.) S. R. ARMSTRONG, Clerk. 

I certify that the foregoing is a true copy of By-law No. 2,425 of the Corpora- 
tion of the City of Peterborough passed by the Council thereof at a meeting held 
November 2nd, 1922. 

(Sgd.) S. R. ARMSTRONG^ City Clerk. 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steam fitter January i, 1923 



24 



Plumber anddteamfitter of Canada 

ESTABLISHED 1907 
Member Audit Bureau of Circulations 
PUBLISHED TWICE MONTHLY BY 

The MacLean Publishing Company, Limited 

Montreal TORONTO, CANADA Winnipeg 

Vol. XVII. JANUARY 1, 1923 No. 1 



Pure Water Lowers Death Rate 

A STATISTICAL record of water purification issued by 
''''Norman J. Howard, bacteriologist in charge of the To- 
ronto filtration plant laboratory, is remarkable in three 
respects: 1. Its revelation of the increasing vileness of the 
raw water supply. 2. Its testimony as to the efficiency of 
filtration plus chlorination. 3. Its proof of the consistently 
excellent tap water which Toronto enjoys despite the yearly 
greater contamination of Lake Ontario. 

In raw water for the slow sand filters, only 18 per cent, of 
the cubic centimeter samples showed the presence of B. Coli, 
the danger signal, in 1912. This percentage grew steadily 
until it reached 40 per cent, in 1918, 53 in 1919, 60 in 1920 and 
over 72 in 1921. The average number of bacteria per cubic 
centimeter developing in tests of the raw water in 1914 was 
103.53. In 1918 it was 356.30; in 1919, 715.11; 1920, 724.51; 
1921, 1,036.49. 

But despite the growing impurity of the Lake Ontario sup- 
ply, the tap water has been uniformly good. The niters have 
reduced the bacteria count by the following percentages: 

Slow Sand Drifting 
Filters Filters 

1914 96.9 

1915 99.5 

1916 98.9 

1917 98.7 

1918 99.1 85.4 

1919 : 99.7 95.3 

1920 99.6 93.9 

1921 99.5 95.2 

These figures are a great tribute to the slow sand niters in- 
stalled many years ago by Mr. Allen Hazen, of New York, and 
violently criticised in certain circles as inefficient before they 
had been given a chance to prove themselves. It was even said 
that they were falling to pieces as soon as built. But they are 
still on the job and removing over 99 per cent, of the bacteria. 

Chlorine removes the remainder. Mr. Howard says: "Treat- 
ed water examined in 100 c. c. shows almost complete steril- 
ization in the winter months, while in the summer occasional 
48-hour fermenters occur, which persistently fail to confirm 
out." 

The result of pure water (plus pasteurization of milk which 
has been enforced since 1915) is seen in the reduction of the 



typhoid death rate. It averaged 18 per 100,000 in the years 
1910-1914 inclusive. It has averaged only a little more than 3 
per 100,000 from that time onward. And this despite an ab- 
normal annual increase in the pollution of the raw water, a 
pollution which Mr. Howard thinks "will go on increasing as 
long as Lake Ontario is regarded as the normal receptacle 
for the discharge of putrescible matter." 

Justice to Plumbers 

TT IS comforting to sanitary engineers to note that some of 
the more thoughtful individuals in business and social life 
are coming to a higher appreciation of the importance of 
this industry. In a recent issue of Commerce and Finance, the 
following laudatory remarks are given: 

"A Boston journal speaks eloquently and, it must be 
said, persuasively in defence of the plumber. It points 
out that in plumbing, as in many lines of endeavor to-day 
really skilled craftsmen are hard to obtain, and that it 
is too much to expect that for every small household job 
the master plumber should always be available. 

"Were he to undertake personally every piece of work 
ordered the business could not be carried on. Plumbers as 
a ruie are reasonably prompt; the call for a household job 
is usually a hurry call and it is of importance that it be 
done quickly. One should not expect the head plumber for 
every leaky faucet or frozen pipe. 

"As for the profits in plumbing, it is pointed out that 
there is many a small plumbing contractor who clears but 
$50, including pay for his own time, on the work that 
goes into a six or eight-room house. The business suffers 
from periods of acute depression, or idleness, and of 
course its volume falls off when such protracted times of 
let-up in domestic building occur as that we have witness- 
ed in recent years. 

"Especially in regard to the inherent and justly famous 
proclivity of the plumber to go back for something does 
the editor urge fairness in criticism. One has but to 
glance at a plumbing supplies catalogue to get an idea 
of the bewildering extent and variety of the things need- 
ed to make a house really and completely modernly 
plumbed. No workman can be expected to carry a hardware 
store on his back every time he comes to fix one's sink 
or restore the normal current of affairs to one's bath- 
room. It is asking too much to look for a 1,000 page cat- 
alogue incarnate in a pair of overalls and a kit. 

"Therefore we again extend to Mr. Gavvthrop and the 
great plumbing industry our acknowledgment of the high 
utility, public spirit and ethical standards of their craft. 
To our earnest readers we pass along this plea for fair 
treatment. Boston has presumably more busted water 
pipes and plumbing troubles than we, for the atmosphere 
and the people are both colder there. 

"We look forward to retiring some day to our farm. 
There are many things indispensable to preserve the 
essential note of simplicity, but of all these there is one 
vital, essential and pre-eminent. A farm to retire to may 
be without ducks, horses, cows, ice-house, shady lane, corn- 
crib, silo, tester, Department of Agriculture bulletins or 
an orchard, but there is one thing it must have and that is 
Modern Plumbing. 

"This is true not only of a farm, but cf a house, apart- 
ment, cottage, flat, bungalow, pyramid, community cen- 
tre and any and every kind of place, dwelling, residence, 
abode or habitation where one would lead a life happy and 
civilized." 

* * * * 

Our ancestors only bathed when they thought it unavoid- 
able, but advertising has sold us a daily habit. Is it now to 
sell us on substitutes therefor? 



January 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 25 

Profitable Field for Plumbers' Efforts 

In Connection With Industrial Hygiene 

Toronto Plumbing Inspectors Find Unsanitary Conditions Affect- 
ing Efficiency of Workers in Many Industrial Plants — Unused 
Closets With Traps Dried Up Are Emitting Sewer Air — Plumber 
Should Discourage Use of Handymen Meddling With Plumbing- 
Work 

By J. W. TROTTER, Inspector of Division of Housing and Industrial Hygiene, Toronto 



1HAVE been honored with the request 
to give some information on what 
has been done in connection with the 
Division of Industrial Hygiene in Tor- 
onto. 

In 1914 this division was organized in 
connection with the Division of Hous- 
ing and in 1918 I was transferred from 
the 'Division of Plumbing and Drainage 
to the Division of Housing and Industrial 
Hygiene. At the present time there are 
two plumbing inspectors, Mr. Norris and 
myself, investigating conditions in the 
different industries, of which there are 
over 2,000 in the City of Toronto. 

An inspector, in addition to plumbing 
and drainage work, has to take into con- 
sideration all conditions in the several 
industries which are likely to affect the 
health of the workers, such as gases, 
chemicals, trade dusts, lighting, ventila- 
tion, temperature, air space, overcrowd- 
ing, expectoration, etc., and unless an in- 
spector knows something of these differ- 
ent conditions, he is at a disadvantage. 
It requires considerable study to make 
one's self efficient in questions such as 
these. 

I wish, however, to confine my remarks 
to general plumbing work in connection 
with the work of our division. 

Plumbing Has Become Faulty 

In dealing with the question of de- 
fective plumbing and drainage, I wish 
it to be understood that in our division 
we deal principally with plumbing which 
has been installed at one time in proper 
manner, but through the work of some 
handy man, probably an engineer or 
caretaker, the work has been made 
faulty, and in many cases positively 
dangerous to health, as you will readily 
perceive. As to work in factories that 
are closed up between the hours of 
starting and the hours of stopping work, 
breathing the foul odors from the un- 
clean bodies of workers, the escape of 
gases in soil and vent pipe and other 
trade smells to say the least, it cannot 
be healthy. 

The vitality of the worker is lowered 
by these conditions to the point where 
he or she is liable to contract any or all 
of the diseases which attack a weakened 
or run down constitution. This is why 
Toronto is endeavoring to try and have 
the plumbing work, with its waste and 



vent p'pes, kept in proper repair as well 
as to see that proper light, fresh air 
and fresh water is given to those whose 
lot it is to work in such places. While 
I am particularizing some of the bad 
cases found I don't want it to be under- 
stood that all our factories are unsatis- 
factory, for let me tell you we have in 
Toronto some very fine employers who 
try and do succeed in having every com- 
fort and convenience, and are constantly 
trying to make the lot of the workers 
as pleasant as possible consistent with 
their work. We have some factories with 
specially fitted wash rooms, with lots of 
hot and cold water, and lunch rooms, 
everything in their surroundings clean, 
and they not only do that but they supply 
hot tea and coffee with milk and sugar at 
cost, and sometimes less than cost to the 
employees, rooms warm and comfortable 
so that the employees may enjoy their 
lunch, away from bench and machines. 
Those are the ideal ones; the ones I 



speak of are the ones we have trouble 
in getting the work made right. 

Plumbing Done by Inexperienced Men 

Every employer should be discourag- 
ed in allowing handy men to do plumbing 
work- These men instal sinks, basins, 
etc., using all manner of material as 
waste pipes. They undoubtedly get rid 
of the waste water but they take no pre- 
caution against the syphoning of traps, 
thus admitting sewer air into the build- 
ing. 

In one instance a factory was found 
where one of these men had installed 
several sinks. He had constructed traps 
of urinals with black iron and fittings, 
and run the waste pipes to soil pipe 
stacks or rain water leaders, whichever 
happened to be the most convenient. 
However, this fellow showed a little in- 
telligence in this way, he had extended 
a half inch pipe from the crown of his 
(Continued on page 36) 



j 
'i 




It is in connection with such conditions as that illustrated here that the chief 
advantage of work along the lines of industrial hygiene can be demonstrated. 
The plumber has a broad field opened to him by conducting educational activ- 
ities among the industries located near him, along the lines suggested in this 

article. 



26 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter January i, 1923 



News Notes From Coast to Coast 



NEW FIRM 

Port Arthur, Ont. — Hugh McCrae has 
commenced a plumbing business here. 



OBITUARY 

Winnipeg. — John Murray, contractor, 
who constructed Winnipeg's first system 
of waterworks in 1881, died last night, 
aged 82. 

Charles A. Sargent, Western manager 
for Darling Bros., Ltd., Montreal, died in 
Chicago while on a business trip. At the 
age of 14 Mr. Sargent commenced with 
the above firm, and remained with them 
until time of death. He was 44 years 
of age, and for the past twenty years re- 
sided in Winnipeg. Apart from being- 
well known in business circles he was 
also prominently identified in sports. 



TORONTO PLUMBERS ELECT 
OFFICERS 

At the annual elect'on meeting of the 
Toronto Brotherhood of Steamfitters and 
Plumbers held in the Labor Temple, the 
officers of the present year were re- 
elected, as follows: President, George 
Holtby, Financial Secretary, Storey Gor- 
don; Business agent, Stewart Richard- 
son; Recording Secretary, Alexander 
McBain. 



SEAFORTH PLUMBER CELEBRATES 
GOLDEN WEDDING 

Seaforth. Ont.— Mr. and Mrs. Sidney 
N. Jacobs celebrated their golden wed- 
ding anniversary here, and were the re- 
cipients of numerous gifts. Their home 
was filled all day long by friends They 
were married in Seaforth on Christmas 
Day, 1872. by the late Rev. C. E. La- 
vell, and have lived here ever since- 
Both are in splendid health and quite ac- 
tive. Mr. Jacobs is a tinsmith and 
plumber, and although 78 still works at 
his trade. 



CANADA PIPE AND STEEL CO. 
SOLD TO CRANE LTD. 

Canada Pipe .& Steel Co. Ltd., (Cluff 
Bros.) >3?nrqnt6y : have decided to discon- 
tinue their plumbing supply business, 
which they have operated for the last 
fifteen years at 85 Church Street, Toron- 
to, and have sold the same to Crane Lim- 
ited, to take effect January 1st, 1923. All 
orders on the books for delivery after 
January 1st will be filled by Crane Lim- 
ited. Messrs. R. J. and W. J. Cluff,. will 
in the future confine their efforts to 
manufacturing only, through Gait Brass 
Company, Limited. 



Doings in the Plumbing and 
Heating Industry 



CHANGE STRATFORD SEWAGE 
DISPOSAL PLANT 

Stratford, Ont. — Certain changes are 
about to be made in the local sewage dis- 
posal, the plans for the proposed alter- 
ations having been approved and sub- 
mitted to the Provincial Board of Health. 
These it is expected will be satisfactory 
and beneficial to all concerned. 



MONTREAL MASTER PLUMBERS 
ELECT OFFICERS 

Montreal. — Officers of the Master 
Plumbers' Association of Montreal for 
the coming year were elected at the an- 
nual general meeting of that body as 
follows: President, George E. Delaney; 
1st vice-president, J. A- Francoeur; 2nd 
vice-president, J. Griffin; chairmen, san- 
itary committee, W. W. Hughes; ar- 
bitration committee, 0. Caron; legisla- 
tion committee, J. St. Amand; appren- 
tices committee, J. Buchan; convenors, 
audit committee, W. G. Borland; 
trustees,, J. A. Gordon; hon. secretary, 
J. A. Belisle; secretary, David K. Trot- 
ter. The report from the principal of the 
Techn'cal School regarding plumbing 
and steamfitting classes recently in- 
augurated there showed 34 French and 
20 English-speaking students, good" at- 
tendance and satisfactory progress. 



WAR AGAINST PLUMBING PRICES, 
FORT WILLIAM 

Fort William, Ont.— Fort William has 
opened battle on plumbing prices . and 
whatever forces lie behind their alleged 
maintenance on an abnormally high lev- 
el, whether for equipment or work. Fol- 
lowing the appointment of a special com- 
mittee of the city council, a meeting was 
held, with plumb, rs and builders in at- 
tendance, at which the committee prac- 
tically decided upon a course of action 
which will leave the door wide open for 
any person to engage in the plumbing 
business. 

So long as the ordinary health of the 
city is guarded, no handicap will be plac- 
ed in the way of plumbing installations 
of any kind. City regulations will be 
amended and licenses hitherto granted to 
master builders abolished, if the council 
approves the committee's proposals. Car- 
rying the fight further afield, the com- 
mittee intends finding out why fixture 
prices are held so high by factories and 
jobbers. 



CRANE LIMITED TO OCCUPY NEW 
PREMISES 

Crane Limited, Toronto, expect to oc- 
cupy, by January 1, 1923, their new 
three-storey office and warehouse, Front 
St., West, which is to cost $125,000. 



GO AHEAD WITH SEWERS 

Bridgeburg, Ont. — Fort Erie ratepay- 
ers at the January election will vote on 
a by-law authorizing the council to sell 
debentures for $45,000 for a sewer dis- 
posal works, sewer pumping plant, force 
mains and the acquirement of necessary 
lands for the disposal works. 

Actual sewers will be installed on the 
frontage-tax plan as the abutting pro- 
perty owners petition for them. 

Plans for building a sewer system for 
the entire village, including the Garrison 
road and the Old Fort district, are com- 
plete. 



SEWER WORK PROGRESSES 

St. Thomas, Ont. — The construction of 
the storm sewer outlets in different 
parts of the city, in accordance with the 
plan for relieving the overloaded sani- 
tary sewers recommended two years 
ago, is well under way, a gang of about 
25 men being engaged in installing the 
East Wellington section off Fifth aven- 
ue. The work is providing employment 
for about 20 extra men in addition to 
the regular employees of the Board of 
Works Department. With favorable 
weather prevailing, it is expected that 
the work will be continued well into 1923. 



PREFER DAMAGED TANKS TO IN- 
TERFERENCE WITH WATER 

Fort William, Ont. — No city of its size, 
larger or smaller, anywhere has a water 
supply which in its relations to requ're- 
ments renders more effective and effic- 
ient service than does the system own d 
and operated by the city of Fort William. 
The annual consumption approximates 
1.093 000,000 Imperial gallons. 

This water system was one of the first 
things that Fort William set out to do 
in a big way and it was one municipal 
venture which turned out to be 100 per 
'cent, perfect. 

The water is absolutely pure, so pure 
in fact that in order to slow up corrosion 
of galvanized water tanks a suggestion 
has been made that foreign matter be 
deposited in the forebay in order that 
sed'mentary lining be provided for the 
tanks. The suggestion has not been re- 
ceived with any great outburst of popu- 
lar applause as the public generally 
seem to prefer absolutely pure water to 
lcng-living water tanks. r 



January 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



27 



Letters to the Editor 



Dear Sirs:— % 

Would you please send me a copy of 
April 1st, 1922, issue of Sanitary Engineer. 
I understand that there is an article in 
this particular issue by Mr. Murray, of 
Saskatchewan, on some tests made for de- 
termining the temperature in septic tanks. 
I would be greatly obliged if you could 
send me a copy of this particular issue. 

(Prof.) R. R. GRAHAM, 
Ontario Agricultural College, Guelph, Ont. 



Dear Sir: — 

As a consistent advertiser in, and reader 
of, and contributor to your magazine, I 
wish to enter a protest against an article 
entitled "Big Opportunities Being Over- 
looked," which appears upon the first page 
of your December 1st issue. Whoever your 
correspondent is he either shows absolute 
ignorance of rural sanitation and water 
supply or has been so absurdly misquoted 
that his "Message to Garcia" has been 
made a burlesque. As those who live out- 
side of the biff cities know, there are many 
municipalities of no mean size which have 
a water supply but no municipal sewage 
system, and many more which have neither. 
This makes the question of sewage dis- 
posal an individual problem rather than a 
municipal one. If your correspondent is 
really in the plumbing supply business as 
you assert, how does he expect to sell his 
product in those localities ''where water 
facilities are now available," and which he 
describes as "the cream of all business for 
the plumber," when he knocks the only 
system which makes plumbing installa- 
tions possible in these centres? Furthermore 
there are thousands of rural schools being 
built and equipped, besides magnificent 
suburban homes. How would he handle 
these? 

It is depressing as well as surprising 
that a man who poses as an authority comes 
out with the statement that while the pres- 
ent tank systems for sewage disposal ade- 
quately meet to-day's requirements, they 
are not as desirable in the interests of 
public health as a modern waterworks sys- 
tem. Of course a septic tank is not con- 
ducive to public health if it is used as a 
source of domestic water supply! We 
cannot recommend the effluvient as a 
beverage — we positively cannot. A prom- 
inent Detroit engineer claims that the 
composition of toilet paper lends itself 
readily as a base for home-brew — but we 
beg to pass. Yours truly, 

L. L. ANTHES. 



PROFITABLE FIELD FOR PLUMBER 

(Continued from page 13) 
neatly constructed traps around the 
rim of the sinks and left the end open. 
In doing this he was trying to prevent 
his traps from syphoning, but he was 
also leaving a half inch pipe wide open 
which was connected to the sewer side 
of the trap. In several fixtures steam 
traps were found discharging from soil 
pipes. This is bad practice as expansion 
and contraction caused the lead-in 
joints in a very short time to get out of 
place. 

Unscrupulous Plumbers 

It is most essential that plumbers 
should co-operate with tb Q health de- 
partment in every respect in order to 
get the best results. Unfortunately a 



few instances have been found where 
plumbers have shown carelessness in 
their work, or were trying to save a few 
dollars in material. One rather glaring 
case was found recently where a Y had 
been cut into a rain water leader and 
sink installed but no precaution had 
been taken against syphoning of trap, by 
placing a vent pipe in the same. 

Loose Closet Bowls 

Many closet bowls were found loose at 
the floor, caused by the screws at the 
front corroding. These screws should 
certainly be of brass or rust-proof metal. 
If the bowl works loose on the floor it 
not only admits sewer air but the move- 
ment of the bowl causes the flush con- 
nection to leak and keep the lavatory 
floor wet and unsanitary. 

Open Waste and Vent Pipes 

It is remarkable the number of open 
waste and vent pipes found. An inspect- 
or has to trace the plumbing very care- 
fully, especially in some of the old build- 
ings that have been reconstructed several 
times to suit different tenants, or he will 
miss a lot of the defective work. 

Unused Plumbing Fixtures 

Too much lavatory accommodation is 
often a fault. In some buildings we 
iound lavatories containing several clos- 
ets were being used as storage rooms, 
closet bowls were covered up with stock, 
traps absolutely dry from evaporation, 
and admitting sewer air into the build- 
ing, later to the lungs of the worker. 
This proves that any plumbing fixture 
which is not. in constant use should be 
removed and the openings sealed. 

Urinals 

All urinals should have automatic 
flush, self-closing valves. Any device 
that must be operated by hand is un- 
sanitary. Most people hesitate to take 
hold of a valve over a urinal because 
they realize a previous person infected 
with disease would probably leave in- 
fection there. The result is that the 
urinal is very seldom flushed. 

Breathers and Breather Caps 

A great many air inlet caps are found 
missing. In the majority of inlets where 
caps are missing they are choked with 
rubbish, most likely put there by child- 
ren. The air inlet in use to-day can cer- 
tainly be improved. 

Drinking Bubble-s 

Unless the water pressure is good and 
strong, bubblers are not sanitary. One 
place was found where the water was 
just rising about an inch over the open- 
ing. A boy came along and placed the 
nozzle in his mouth, and was able to 
drink the water as fast as it came. Now 
if the pressure had been stronger, he 
would not have been able to keep his 
face down to the water. 

(Continued on page 23) 




Tourist (in village notion store) — 
Whaddya got in the shape of motor car 
tires ? 

Saleslady — Funeral wreaths, life pre- 
servers, invalid cushions and doughnuts. 

* * * 

"No, sah, Ah don't never ride on dem 
things," said an old colored woman 
looking in on the merry-go-round. "Why, 
de other day I seen dat Rastus Johnson 
git on an' ride a dollah's worth an' den 
git off at the same place he started at. 
I says to him, 'Rastus,' I says, r yo 
spent yo' money, but whar yo' been'?" 

* ♦ # 

"Then, when you have finished your 
lecture," said the professor of elocu- 
tion and deportment to young Dulle, 
"bow gracefully, and leave the platform 
on tiptoe." 

"Why on tiptoe?" queried Dulle. 

"So as not to wake the audience," re- 
plied the professor. — Judge. 

A red-headed boy applied for a job in 
a butcher shop. "How much will- you 
give me?" 

"Three dollars a week; but what can 
you do to make yourself useful around 
a butcher shop?" 

"Anything." 

"Well, be specific. Can you dress a 
chicken ?" 

"Not on three dollars a week," said 
the boy. — Life. 

Dibbs: "Where are you going in such 
a hurry?" 

Gibbs: "To the police station to get 
a warrant for my wife's arrest." 

"On what charge?" 

"Rocking me to sleep." 

"You can't have your wife arrested for 
that." 

"Can't eh? You should have seen the 
rock ! " — Exchange. 

* * * 

"You look like an idiot," thundered the 
disgusted man to his swell son, just re- 
turned from college. "You grow more 
and more like a conceited, hare-brained, 
helpless idiot." Just then an acquaint- 
ance of the old gentleman entered the 
office and saw the youth. 

"Hello, Charlie, back eh!" exclaimed 
the visitor. "You're looking more like 
your father every year." 

"Yes," said Charlie, "that's just what 
the governor's been telling me." 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



January 1, 1923 



APPRECIATES HELP OF "SANI- 
TARY ENGINEER" 

J. P. Ibbotson writes to Sanitary En- 
gineer stating that the outlook for sani- 
tary work in the rural districts in the 
next few months is fairly good. Farmers 
are said to be more disposed to invest 
in sanitary equipment. He finds that 
personal work in encouraging the re- 
placement of worn equipment brings 
good results. He states that his biggest 
problem to-day is in connection with 
collections. 

Concerning Sanitary Engineer Mr. 
Ibbotson states, "I like the paper and 
appreciate the help it gives. The ar- 
ticles now being published on Rural Sew- 
age Disposal are excellent, so are those 
on pattern cutting." 



Use of Trade Acceptances is Extending 

To Avoid Losses and the Husbanding of Funds, 
Trade Acceptances Replacing Open Accounts in 
Many Instances — Book Debts Have^Caused Much 
Trouble in Assignments 



TAP THREE SOURCES FOR WATER 
SUPPLY 

Montreal. — Such is the quantity of 
water required to carry on the business 
of the Mount Royal Hotel, that three 
sources of supply have to be drawn on 
to meet the aemand. Water is taken from 
the high pressure and also the low pres- 
sure mains of the city of Montreal, be- 
sides which the hotel is equipped with 
an artes an well, 950 feet deep, from 
which 8,000 gallons per hour can be 
drawn. 

The diameter of this well is ten inches. 
A 10-ir.ch steel casing with a drive shoe 
was inserted from the surface of the 
ground 12 feet into the bed rock for the 
purpose of casing off the 34 feet of clay 
and 11 feet of hardpan and surface 
waters encountered. The 10 inch well 
was drilled through 850 feet of chazy, 
trenton, and calciferous limestone rock. 

From two water veins encountered at 
362 and 855 feet a supply of 7,200 gal- 
lons of pure water per hour at a tem- 
perature of 52 degrees Fahrenheit was 
pumped, maintaining a level of 133 feet 
from the well top. The water is del ver- 
ed by means of No. 7 type V. A. Imper- 
ial air lift supplied from two 12 x 10 
air compressors, the one for service op- 
eration being electrically driven and the 
one for reserve having steam drive. 

From all these sources, cold water is 
pumped or forced by the operation of the 
law of gravity, to two 10,000 gallon stor- 
age tanks on the roof, with a horizontal 
overhead distribution main delivering 
water to all fixtures throughout the 
building. All water for general house 
purposes is filtered by a battery of fil- 
ters, and water for laundry purposes is 
treated by a water-softening plant. 

Drainage water from the basement 
and bo'ler room is pumped to the sewer 
by three ejector pumps. The combined 
capacity of these three ejectors is 850 
gallons a minute. Five hot-water heat- 
ers supply hot water, with a combined 
capacity of 19,000 gallons per hour. Ex- 
haust steam is being largely used in sup- 
plying the heat for these heat rs. 



TO AVOID losses in most cases, and 
a desire to husband funds in 
others, are the material factors 
in spreading the movement in the Do- 
minion in favor of trade acceptances 
with a consequent abandoning of open 
accounts. It is rather surprising to 
find the number of firms using this meth- 
od of doing business to-day and also the 
percentage that have been employing it 
for years. Out of a large file of letters 
giving views on the efficiency of trade 
acceptances over open accounts, not one 
argued against the proposal, while many 
offered reasons and arguments in favor. 

Recently the Canadian Credit Men's 
Trust Association of Winnipeg, focused 
attention on the matter by sending a 
plea to many business organizations for 
assistance and co-operation in increasing 
the use of trade acceptances, drafts and 
bills of exchange, in commercial trans- 
actions and to decrease as far as pos- 
sible the system of open accounts. 

One of the main arguments in favor 
of such a move is that the Bankruptcy 
Act of 1921 made null and void genera! 
assignment of book debts as against 
the trustee in bankruptcy, except in 
provinces where there is provision for 
registration. The draft or bill of ex- 
change is, therefore, advanced as a 
legal admission of liability when accept- 
ed by the customer, whereas book debts' 
have in the past proven the subject of 
never-ending disputes. 

The Canadian Manufacturers' Associa- 




tion took the matter up with its mem- 
oership and received quite a general re- 
sponse in the way of letters. To these 
might be added the views of some bank- 
ers. One of the latter stated that the 
time was coming when drafts and bills 
of exchange will be almost exclusively 
used. Many industrial heads' of the Do- 
minion stated that they were reluctant 
now to carry an open account for any 
firm and did not do so if they could pos- 
sibly avoid it. 

"As a young concern we found it very 
inconvenient to have large sums tied up 
in open accounts," wrote one maritime 
firm. He said it was found to be the 
only proper method of settlement and 
enabled them to get along much better 
on their limited capital. 

An old banker, now the head of a 
large industrial organization, declares 
that he long realized the great benefit 
of trade acceptances. He never en- 
couraged open accounts. His main rea- 
son for this was that they caused a 
great portion of the business losses' of 
the day. 

One Montreal miller declares that he 
has not kept an open account for some 
time and declares that to-day all milling 
sales are subject to either draft or note. 

The one stumbling block discovered 
relates to the stamps on bills of ex- 
change. Some of the business men 
fear that they would lose considerably 
on unaccepted paper. However, there 
is a movement in this regard in co-oper- 
ation with the larger one. It is to have 
the stamps payable only once. The de- 
tails of how it is proposed to work this 
out have not yet been advanced. 



GEORGE E. DELANEY 
Elected President Montreal Master 
Plumbers' Association for 1923. 



MAKES A REPORT ON SANITATION 

Ottawa. — During the year just closing 
greatly improved conditions existed in 
Ottawa along sanitation lines, according 
to the 22nd annual report of Chief San- 
itary Inspector G. O. S. Laflamme. Only 
19,464 calls were dealt with, as com- 
pared with 23,420 the previous year. 

"It is unfortunate," he states, "that 
the progress which had been made dur- 
ing the last couple of years in reducing 
the number of privy vaults should have 
been interfered with this year, through 
the granting of permits in the west end 
of the city. In the majority of cases 
these privies are isolated from the sew- 
erage system. I would respectfully sub- 
mit that in future no such permits be 
granted without the authority of the 
medical health officer, and that it be 
understood that, where at all possible, 
the privies must be connected with the 
sewage system." 



January 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



29 



Market Conditions and Tendencies 



ALTHOUGH several price develop- 
ments in the sanitary and heating 
markets are apparently anticipat- 
ed during the opening weeks of the New 
Year, the number of revised quotations 
at the present time is somewhat limited. 
This is commonly attributed to the in- 
fluence of the holiday atmosphere in the 
markets. A much firmer undertone is 
apparent, however, especially in certain 



Montreal Markets 

MONTREAL, December 30. — Although actual price changes are 
fewer on the current markets for plumbing and steam-fitting 
supplies, developments on primary markets attract attention. 
Following a continued slump in pig iron prices for some weeks past, 
quotations are now advanced one dollar per ton. This upward ten- 
dency is looked on bv some as the turning: point, and a firmer tone 
from now on will be displayed. There is still a strong undertone in 
cotton waste prices, and higher prices are looked for in some quar- 
ters early next month. Wrought iron and steel pipe is in a firm 
market position, and other lines of iron and steel products, such as 
sheets and bar products, show a strengthening tendency. Valves and 
bibbs are unchanged in price, and although this market is described 
by most manufacturers as steady to firm, there is still a feeling in 
some quarters that slight revisions will be announced early in the 
new year. Ingot metals are quiet, but firm in tone. Trade in most 
lines is quieter, although described as quite seasonal. 



IMPROVED TONE IN BRASS AND 
COPPER PRODUCTS 

Montreal. 

With copper on primary metal mar- 
kets displaying a firmer tone there is 
a strengthening attitude in such finished 
products as sheets, rods and tubing. De- 
mand for these lines is also said to be 
fair for this time of year, and if any- 
thing a little better than in previous 
weeks. Quotations are unchanged and 
are described as steady at the following 
levels: 



BRASS — Base. 
Rebate of 20 cents for empty bags. 

Sheets, base 24 

Rods, base % to 1 in., round 22 

Tubing, seamless, base 30 

F.o.b. 

COPPER— 

Rods, % to 2 in 29 

Soft sheets, plain, 16 oz. and heavier 30 

Plain tinned, 16 oz. and heavier. ... 36 
Polished, and tinned, 16 oz. and 

heavier, lb 41 

Tubing, lb 41 

Tubing, lb 32 



Above prices are full sheets and bars. Cut 
sheets and bars are 5c. per lb. higher. 



QUIET MARKET FOR MALLEABLE 
AND CAST FITTINGS 

Montreal. 

With the annual inventory period now 
practically at hand, there has been a 
noticeable slackening in demand for pipe 
fittings during the past week, and a 
quieter market is now anticipated for 



Price Trend on Sanitary and \ 
Heating Supplies 



basic elements which contribute towards:, 
maintaining current levels on many 
manufactured plumbing lines. The de- 
gree of improvement recently outlined in 
the asbestos market continues, and quo- 
tations have firmed up to more uniform 
levels on comparative centres. The ad- 



the opening weeks of the new year. Al- 
though there is no definite indication oi 
a change in prices, it is stated in some 
quarters that slightly easier quotations 
may appear on some lines next month. 
Present discounts are as follows: 



PIPE FITTINGS — 

Cast iron fittings 27% 

Plugs, cast iron 27% 

Do., solid 27% 

Do., countersunk 27% 

Bushings, cast 30% 

Do., malleable 309; 

Unions 45% 

Flanged unions 27% 

Flanged fittings 27% 

Dart unions, black 33 1-3% 

Dart unions, galv 1395 

Nipples, Vs to 4", close and short 55% 

Do., long 60% 

Do., 4% to 8", close and short 45% 

Do., long 50% 

Couplings. 4" and under 25% 

Do.. 4%" and larger 5% 

Malleable Fittings — 

Piece list effective June 1st, 1922. Discoun* 
70 per cent. 



HOLIDAY SEASON REFLECTED IN 
SCRAP MARKETS 

Montreal. 

Winter dullness, reflecting the holiday 
season, is evident in the local markets 
for waste materials, trade being general- 
ly described as very quiet. Accompany- 
ing this is a little weaker tone in some 
lines, especially yellow and red metals. 
Brass and copper showed a slight im- 
provement when there was a better buy- 
ing movement noted in recent weeks, 



vance of one dollar per ton in pig iron 
indicates a reversal of the former price 
trend. Radiator valves are now general- 
ly quoted at the discount level of 58 per 
cent., as briefly outlined in the last is - 
sue. Cotton wastes continue at the re- 
vised levels, but decided firmness is re- 
corded. That some price developments 
may materialize on closet outfits is the 
opinion prevalent in the trade, while 
similar rumors are noted with regard to 
ca&t iron fittings. 

but interest has now subsided to quite 
an extent. Cast iron is also in a, list- 
less state, while steel scrap is reported 
as the steadiest material on the list. No 
changes in prices have been made, and 
following are dealers' average buying 
quotations: 

SCRAP MATERIALS— 

' Automobile Tires 40 

Rubber shoes 02% 

Yellow brass » 0b to 06 

Red brass 08% 

Light brass 04 

Scrap zinc 04% 

Lead, heavy 04% 

Lead, tea 03 

Light copper 08% to 09 

Heavy copper „ 11% 

Wrought iron, R. Rd., Mo. 1 per gr.ton 11 00 

Malleable scrap (ton) 9 00 to 10 00 

Pipe scrap (ton) 7 00- 

Heavy melting steel 9 00 9 50- 

No. 2 busheling . . 3 00 

BLiier plate . 3 00 to 9 00 

No. 1 machinery cast 20 00 to 22 00 



MORE SATISFACTORY CONDITION 
IN IRON AND STEEL 

Montreal. 

A steady to firm attitude is again 
presented in the market for bar iron and 
steal products. Current business is 
only fair, and orders are for the most 
part small and of a sorting character, 
reflecting the usual condition at the 
present holiday and inventory period. 
As outlined in former reports, how- 
ever, there is more interest showing for 
future, and forward deliveries are being 
made at to-day's prices. As in other 
iron and steel commodities, it is expect- 
ed that bar products will show an im- 
proved market tone, with a steady to 
firm situation assisting in this direction. 
Local average quotations are as fol- 
lows: 



BAR IRON — 

Common bar iron, 100 lbs 3 15 

Refined iron 4 65 

Irish finish machinery steel 3 20 

Mild steel 3 15 

Single reeled machinery steel 5 25 

Band steel 3 50 3 65 

Spring steel 4 75 8 BO 

Sleighshoe steel 3 15 

Tire steel 3 35 

Harrow tooth steel 3 30 

Toe caulk steel 4 05 

Mining tool steel, per lb 20% 



Black Diamond tool and cast steel, per lb.O ?'|% 
NOTE! — Refined iron is approximately $1.60 per 
100 lbs. over base, but fluctuates owing to in- 
settled market. 

Bnnd steel in scroll bundles, 50c per inn hs. 
>xt r:i. 



30 



FIRM UNDERTONE REMAINS IN 
COTTON WASTES 

Montreal. 

With current trade in cotton wastes 
continuing in seasonal proportions, a 
firm undertone remains in the market 
due to the improved tone in raw cotton 
circles. As outlined in a previous re- 
port a further revision upwards in prices 
would not be surprising after the first 
of the year. Prevailing quotations are: 

COTTON WASTES— Per lb. 

Cream polishing .... M 

White, XXX extra . 17 

White. XX grand 16 

White XLCR 15 

X Empire JJM 

X Press 12 

Colored — 

^--.r:::::::x::-::K::: Ilk 

Standard Oil 

Popular 0*% 

Keen 08 

Wool packing — 

Arrow 24 

Axle 20 

Anvil » " 

Dominion Wipers — 

White cotton 20 

Colored cotton " 



WROUGHT PIPE IS NOW QUIETER 
BUT FIRM 

Montreal. 

Although the movement of wrought 
iron and steel piping has recently slack- 
ened somewhat, this is only considered 
seasonal, and satisfaction with business 
during the past season is expressed. 
Producers again state that present prices 
are firm with a strong tendency in raw 
materials, deliveries on some of which 
are still slow. Quotations remain at list 
No. 57. 



STEADY OUTLOOK IN SHEET 
MARKETS 

Montreal. 

Interest in the local sheet markets is 
still attached to prospects for the open- 
ing months of next year, and it is said 
that the New Year should open with 
quite satisfactory conditions in sheet 
circles. Manufacturers are in many in- 
stances behind in deliveries, which, in 
spite of the present quieter season, 
should greatly assist towards maintain- 
ing a steady market position. Anothei 
factor is the apparently steady basis on 
which sheets are placed for the first 
quarter, which has resulted in consider- 
able business being placed for later de- 
livery. Taken altogether importers 
and distributors anticipate a satisfac- 
tory market for the first half of next 
year at least Average local quota- 
tions are unchanged as follows: 

BLACK SHEETS— 

10 gauge, base •'■ • • 4 25 

12 gauge 4 35 

14 gauge 4 4o 

16 gauge 4 55 

■ 18—20 gauge 4 80 

22—24 gauge 4 85 

26 gauge 4 90 

28 gauge 5 1° 

GALVANIZED SHEETS — 

Queen's Head Fleur de Lis 

28 gauge 7 25 7 0D 

26 gauge 7 00 6 75 

24 gauge 6 70 6 45 

22 gauge 6 65 6 40 

18—20 gauge 6 40 6 15 



Other Brands — 

10% oz 7 00 

28 U. S. base 6 50 

26 U. S. base 6 25 

24—22 gauge 6 10 

J 20 — 18 gauge 5 90 

16 gauge 5 75 

1 Above prices are for % ton lots in English 

(iron and 1000 lb. lots in American iron with an 
(extra charge of 25c. for less quantities. Extra for 

sheets :i ft. wide, 28 gauge and 10% oz.. 25c. per 

100 lbs. Further extra for sheets 4 ft. wide 
according to gauge. 
TIN PLATE— 

20 x 28 x 100 lb. basis 12 35 

20 x 28 IC. 112s 12 75 

20 x 28 IX, 112s 15 00 

20 x 28 IXX, 56s 8 50 

20 x 28 IXXX, 56s 10 00 

TERNE PLATE— 

20 x 28 TC. 112s. 200 lb 13 50 

20 x 28 IC, 112s, 214 lb 13 00 

CANADA PLATE— 

Half bright 52s 4 85 

Half bright 60s 4 90 

Blued 52s 5 10 

Blued 60s 5 15 

Welsh, polished, 52s 6 50 

Welsh, polished, 60s 6 75 

Galvanized 52s 7 25 

Galvanized 60s 7 75 



82 " 74.00 

100 " lOo.UU 

120 " lli.UU 

144 " 164 ou 

168 " 187.00 

192 210.00 

Std., less 40 per cent. ; Ex. Heavy, 30 per cent. 



NO CHANGE IN VALVE AND BIBB 
QUOTATIONS 

Montreal. 

Current quotations on valves and 
bibbs are unchanged, and while the 
market is described as steady in most 
quarters, there is still a feeling among 
some that minor revisions on certain 
lines will be made early in the new year. 
Recent minor fluctuations in raw ma- 
terials have apparently not materially 
affected the market for finished pro- 
ducts. Prevailing discounts are: 
VALVES— 

Compression work, standard 45% 

Fuller work, standard 30% 

Quick opening compression bibbs 43% 

Bath cocks, quick opening 41% 

Bath cocks, compression 41% 

Basin cocks, quick opening 46% 

Flatway stop and waste cocks, standard 54% 
Roundway stop and waste cocks, st'nd'rd 46% 

Brass steam cocks, standard, % in 60% 

Radiator valves, standard 58% 

Do., removable discs 58% 

Globe, angle and check valves, standard 25% 

Gate or straightway 25% 

Emco globe valves 33% 

Emco check valves 33% 

Jenkins globe, angle, check and swing 

check 10% 

Jenkins gate or straightway 16% 

Montreal. 

Jenkins iron body, globe and angle 15% 

Jenkins iron body, gate 25% 

N. P. "O" and "S" traps 40% 



FIRM TENDENCY REMAINS IN 
RANGE BOILERS 

Montreal. 

Manufacturers and distributors of 
range boilers describe business as quiet- 
er, although fair for the time of year. 
Stocks in dealers' hands have been low, 
and remain so, thus demand while for 
small quantities has continued well up 
to the holiday season. There is a firm 
tone in the market owing to the strong 
tendency in raw material and other re- 
placement costs, and following are list 
prices and discounts: 

RANGE BOILERS : — 

5 Gallon MSjBO 

12 " 14.00 

18 " 15.00 

25 " 16.50 

30 " • W-60 

35 " 20.50 

40 " 22.76 

52 " 38.00 

66 " 60.75 



SEASONABLE TRADE IN LEAD AND 
ZINC PRODUCTS 

Montreal. 

Quotations on lead and zinc products 
remain unchanged, with primary met- 
als, which enter into their production, 
reported as steady to firm at higher 
levels recently reached. The movement 
of the finished products is seasonal, 
only a moderate amount of . activity 
usually being in evidence at this time 
of year. Following are unchanged price 
levels: 

LEAD AND ZINC PRODUCTS— 

Lead pipe, per 100 lbs., up to 2" 14 00 

Do., 2" to 8" 15 00 

Do., 8" and over 16 00 

Lead waste, per 100 lbs 15 00 

Note — Lead pipe is subject to a discount of 10%.' 

Lead traps and bends 15% 

Lead wool, lb 18% 

Lead sheets, 2% lbs., sq. ft. lb i 11 

Lead sheets, 3 to 3% lbs., sq. ft. lb... 10% 

Do., 4 to 8 lbs., sq. ft. lb 10 

Cut sheets, %c. lb. extra and cut sbeets 
to size, %c. lb. extra. 

Solder, guaranteed, lb 26 1 /. 

Do., strictly, lb 23% 

Do., commercial, lb 22% 

Do., wiping, lb 22% 

Do., wire, lb 36 

Zinc, sheets, casks 11 

Do., broken lots 11% 



KNIFE HANDLED WRENCHES AT 
HIGHER LEVELS 

Montreal. 

Through a revision in discounts quo- 
tations on W. & B. knife handled 
wrenches are advanced, and f hese are 
now less 37% per cent. Coes' are quot- 
ed at 30 per cent. off. 



BOILER TUBES MOVE IN SMALL 
QUANTITIES 

Montreal. 

Boiler tubes are only selling in limit- 
ed quantities, and the market is describ- 
ed as quiet. Deliveries from the mills 
are a little slow but because of the quiet 
demand no shortage is felt. Quota- 
tions are unchanged at the following av- 
erage prices: 

BOILER TUBES— 

Seamless Lapweld 

1 inch 20 00 .... 

1%, inch 22 00 

1% inch 21 00 

1% inch 24 50 24 00 

2 inch 21 00 19 75 

2% inch 24 00 22 25 

2% inch 27 00 23 25 

3 inch 33 00 29 50 

•3% inch 38 00 34 25 

4 inch 49 00 43 50 



MODERATE TRADE IN SOIL PIPE 
AND FITTINGS 

Montreal. " 

Current trade in soil pipe and fittings 
is now said to be of moderate propor- 
tions, although fair for this season of 
the year. Regarding- the undertone of 
the -market for these products a local 
manufacturer stated that they were 
watching more recent developments in 
the pig iron market with interest, ani 



January 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



31 



while the advance in prices last week down to bottom and with conditions in 
was of a minor nature, it may mean the the steel industry promising well for the 
turn to a stiff er market which would New Year it was thought improbable 
directly reflect on products such as that prices would remain at levels re- 
these. With pig iron continuing to show cently announced. Reports from Unit- 
recessions their products were placed on ed States markets show that many cpn- 
an easier market although supplies on sumers took advantage of the reduced 
hand were sufficient to carry them over prices and this was a strong factor in 
the present quieter period. It was now producing higher quotations. An ad- 
very problematic what existing values vance of $1.00 per ton is also announced 
would be when they were again in this week in some quarters on these 
the market for raw material. Unchang- markets. Although local producers of 
ed quotations are: steel products are sufficiently supplied 
soil pipe— with pig iron for the opening months of 
2 and 3 inch 35% the new year at the present ratio of op- 

4 inch ... 3o% eration, stocks are by no means heavy 

5 and 6 inch o5% » . . * . . , , , 

8 inch net and a trade revival would place them 

fittings ' n the market for pig before many 

2 to 6 inch 'to'.': weeks pass. Present local quotation is 

8 inch net $34.15 per ton. 



QUIETER PERIOD NOW EVIDENT 
IN CORRUGATED 

Montreal. 

Following a quite satisfactory move- 
ment in corrugated sheets up to the 
present time, there is now a slackening 
in sales with the appearance of the 
holiday season. Quotations on these 
products are unchanged and the mar- 
ket is again described as steady. Fol- 
lowing are list prices and discounts: 

CORRUGATED SHEETS— Per 100 Sq. Ft. 

No. 28 gauge 6 50 

No. 26 gauge 7 00 

No. 26. U. S. gauge 8 00 

No. 24 gauge 9 00 

No. 22 gauge 11 00 

No. 20 gauge 12 50 

No. 18 gauge 16 50 

Less 10 per cent. 

Lighter than 24 gauge and wider than 27 
inches, 75c. per square extra. 



STEADY TONE NOTED IN AS- 
BESTOS PRODUCTS 

Montreal. 

Notwithstanding a little quieter de- 
mand in asbestos products, and higher 
price levels recently announced, a steady 
to firm undertone is still noted in the 
market. Trade in pipe and boiler cov- 
erings has slackened during recent 
weeks, but there is a fair amount of 
activity reported in magnesia coverings, 
and slower deliveries also add to the 
firmer tendency on this product. Fol- 
lowing are unchanged quotations: 

ASBESTOS PRODUCTS— 

Off list prices 

2 ply pipe covering 57%% 

3 ply pipe covering 55% 

4 ply pipe covering 50% 

85% magnesia 40% 

Per b'«r 

Boiler covering 1 50 

Per 100 lbs 

Asbestos sheathing 7 75 8 25 



ADVANCED PRICES ANNOUNCED 
ON PIG IRON 

Montreal. 

After a receding market for some 
weeks past, domestic pig iron prices are 
now advanced $1.00 per ton. Although 
this marks a sudden reverse trend, this 
development does not come as any great 
surprise to some well informed, as the 
former level was recognized as well 



SEASONAL DEMAND NOTED IN 
ENAMELED WARE 

Montreal. 

Enameled ware continues to move in 
fair seasonal volume, although the holi- 
day period has produced a quieter mar- 
ket during the past week or so. No 
change is made in quotations, and fol- 
lowing are list prices with discount of 
33-1/3 per cent-: 

ENAMELED WARE — 
Sinks, roll rim — 

18 x 30 

Sinks, flat rim — 1 only 2 only 

16 x 24 $ 7 50 $ 7 40 

18 x 30 8 70 8 60 

20 x 30 9 90 9 80 

Bath tubs, roll rim, 4. 4%, 6 feet, 24 to 

30 in. wide '6 

Bath tubs, 5% feet. 

Lavatories — 

17x19 in. Apron F139 or P404B 

18x24 in. Apron F154 or P3845 or P3847 

18x21 in. Apron F169 or P4205 

17x19 in. Roll rim. F241 or P4345 

Less 33 1-3 per cent. 



$23 00 
3 only 
$ 7 30 

8 50 

9 70 

1 40 
67 10 

15 30 
23 60 
17 60 
12 60 



QUIETER TRADE IN CLOSET COM- 
BINATIONS 

Montreal. 

Current trade in closet outfits, as in 
other enameled ware, continues on the 
quieter side. There is little or nothing 
new in the market, and quotations are 
nominally unchanged at following price 
levels: 

CLOSET COMBINATIONS-- 

Low down outfits, each 

Closet, standard outfit, oak 25 00 

Do., post hinge seat 26 00 

Do., oak vitro or Pussyfoot 26 00 

Do., post hinge seat 26 20 

Do., mahogany vitro or Pussyfoot, post 

hinge seat and cover 28 45 

Do., vitreous china, oak post hinge seat 

and cover 28 45 

Do., vitreous china, mahogany post 

hinge seat and cover 29 50 

Do., white Vitro mahogany post hinge seat 

and cover 29 50 

Mahogany post hinge seat and cover .... 28 70 
Do., enamelled iron tank, oak post 

hinge seat and cover 29 50 

Do., enamelled iron tank, oak post hinge 

seat and cover 29 50 

post hinge seat and cover 29 50 

Add for % in valve on supply pipe... 1 25 

Add for spud 60 

Add for reverse trap bowl 1 50 

Add for syphon jet bowl 7 00 

Deduct for supply pipe 80 

Deduct for floor hinge 60 

CLOSET BOWLS — 
Richelieu bowl 8 50 



Washdown bowl with spud 10 60 

Reverse trap bowl with spud 11 35 

Syphon jet bowl with spud 16 25 

CLOSET SEATS— 

Oak post hinge seat and cover 3 85 

Oak wood strip seat and cover 3 60 

Mahogany finish post hinge seat and 

cover 4 05 

closet tanks- 
Low down, oak vitro with fittings, less 

seat 12' 25 

White vitro or Pussyfoot with fittings, 

flush elbow and supply 15 65 

Vitreous china tank with fittings, flush 

elbow and supply 19 00 

Enamelled iron with fittings, flush 

elbow and supply 16 50 



INGOT METALS ARE QUIETER BUT 
CONTINUE FIRM 

Montreal. — — 

Ingot metal markets remain quite 
firm although there are certain evidences 
that the holiday spiiit is prevailing. 
Copper is the feature of the market, 
this metal being particularly strong in 
tone, although there is no sign of weak- 
ness in any other lines. 

TIN. — After showing a sharp advance 
in London the early part of the week 
tin re-acted slightly, but the tone is still 
firm and it is thought probable that 
higher prices will rule after the holiday 
period. The advance in sterling means 
higher prices on this side. Local price 
is slightly higher at. 43 cents. 

COPPER.— The situation on this met- 
al has altogether changed during the 
past few weeks, and the tone of the mar- 
ket is very firm. Electro is quoted at 
about 14% cts., refinery, i.e., an advance 
of almost one cent in two weeks. Lon- 
don also reflects the improved tone on 
this side and export has picked up as 
well as local consumption. Market is 
firm here at 18 cts. for electro and lTVz 
cts. for casting. 

LEAD. — Another advance in trust 
price was recorded in the U. S. A. this 
week, while London also went to a high- 
er level. Demand remains remarkably 
good and production is only about equal 
thereto. Local quotation 8 cents. 

SPELTER. — East St. Louis has again 
re-acted on cessation of English buying, 
but it is thought that a seven-cent level 
will bring about a resumption of this, 
and further advances may follow. The 
statistical position of this metal remains 
good as supplies are still short and it 
will be difficult to inciease production 
during the winter months- Local prices, 
are firm from 9% to 10 cents. 

ANTIMONY.— There is no particular 
feature to this market, but offerings 
from China are said to be fairly heavy 
and reasonable in price. This metal is- 
undoubtedly cheap and it is thought 
only a question of time until an advance- 
is made. Chinese is quoted at 7% 
cts., high grade English at 7% cts. 

ALUMINUM. — Aluminum is firm in 
the U. S. A., but the market is quiet 
here with quotation unchanged at 22 
cents. 



32 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



January 1, 192:5 



Toronto Markets 

TORONTO, December 30. — Only a minor number of price de- 
velopments are recorded in the current plumbing and steam- 
fitting supply markets. A few revisions are evident, however, 
such as the higher quotations on certain asbestos products — which 
development was foreshadowed in earlier reports — and the fact that 
radiator valves are now generally being quoted at the discount level 
of 58 per cent. The recent increase in pig iron prices attracts at- 
tention in primary sources, this being a reversal of form as regards 
the prevailing price tendency in this direction. That there may be 
some revision in pipe fitting prices is the current impression in cer- 
tain quarters of the trade, while the rumor is also prevalent con- 
cerning possible future revisions in closet outfits. 



PRICES ADVANCED ON ASBESTOS 
PRODUCTS 

Toronto. 

As foreshadowed in a former issue of 
Sanitary Engineer, a revision has now 
•been made in quotations on asbestos pro- 
ducts. Discounts on air cell pipe cover- 
ing have been reduced ten points, thus 
bringing higher price levels into effect 
on these products. Asbestos sheathing is 
likewise advanced, the new price being 
around eight cents per pound. Magnesia 
pipe covering also undergoes a similar 
revision, while boiler covering appears 
with an upward tendency. This revision 
is attributed to the firmer trend in prim- 
ary markets, a condition previously 
pointed out. There is a shortage of as- 
bestos fibre at production centres, and 
manufacturers state that under the pres- 
ent trend of the mai'ket, another ad- 
vance might be expected should the up- 
ward movement continue in basic ele- 
ments. Following are revised quota- 
tions: 

ASBESTOS PRODUCTS — 
Pipe Covering — 

Air cell, 4 ply 50 per cent, off list. 

Air cell, 3 ply 55 per cent, off list. 

Air cell. 2 ply 57% per cent, off list. 

Boiler Covering $1.50 — $-2.00 per bag. 

Asbestos Sheathing $8.00 per 100 lbs. 

■Magnesia pipe covering less 35 per cent. 



PIG IRON PRICE IN SEE-SAW MOVE- 
MENT 

Toronto. 

Following the recent reduction in pig 
iron prices of $2.00 per ton, an advance 
has been recorded this week, which indi- 
cates the improved activity of the mar- 
ket as outlined in a former issue. The 
extent of the increase is $1.00 per ton, 
this change bringing the prevailing quo- 
tation up to $31.80. Brisk activitv in 
placing contracts at the former level is 
described as leading to the current re- 
vision. 



COTTON WASTES CONTINUE AT 
REVISED LEVELS 

Toronto. 

Quotations on cotton wastes are still 
holding at the recently revised levels, 
and while the opinion has been expressed 
in certain quarters that further upward 
movement might develop early in the 
New Year, up to the present no change 
of this kind has materialized. It is gen- 
erally recognized, however, that prices 
are on a firm basis, and should raw cot- 



ton continue to climb and this factor be 
reflected in cotton wastes, the opinion is 
expressed that additional slight increases 
would not be surprising. The following 
levels govern the local markets at pres- 
ent: 

COTTON WASTES — 

Cream, polishing 19 

White, XXX 19 

XX 17 

X 16 

XC... 14'/> 

XXX, extra 17 

XX. grand 16 

XLCR 15 

X, Empire 18% 

X press 12 

Colored, No. 1 13 V. 

No. 17 12 1 /" 

No 1A ny" 

No. IB lOty, 

Fancy 14 

Lion 12 V. 

Standard Oil" 

Popular 09 V' 

Keen 08 

Above lines subject to trade discount fcr quan- 
tity. 



MAY BE REVISION IN CAST FIT- 
TING PRICES 

Toronto. 

Business in pipe fittings is stated to 
be just on a fair basis at present. While 
reports from certain distributors de- 
scribe trade as "ordinary for this time 
of the year," others state that it is "not 
good." It is evident that there is no 
activity worth mentioning and not much 
is expected during the stock-taking per- 
iod. That some revision may develop 
early in the New Year on cast iron fit- 
tings is rumored on the local market, 
slightly easier levels being said to be 
pending on account of anxiety in cer- 
tain quarters to open up the market. 
Discounts in general remain unchanged 
at the following levels: 

PIPE FITTINGS- Per Cent. 

Cast iron fittings 27 

Plugs, cast iron 27 

Do., solid 27 

Do., countersunk 27 

Bvehings, malleable 30 

Do., cast 30 

Unions. % in. to 2 in 45 

Do., V? in.. 2% to 4 in 45 

Flanged unions, std 27 



RADIATOR VALVES NOW AT 58 PER 
CENT. OFF 

Toronto. 

Manufacturers and distributors rec- 
ord a fair volume of activity keeping up 
in brass compression goods. Trade for 
this time of the year is described as 
brisk, a condition caused generally hy 



recent building operations, and repair 
work- In conjunction with the current 
annual inventory period, the hum of ac- 
tivity in warehouses is therefore evi- 
dently reflecting these causes. Quota- 
tions remain unchanged, with the tone 
of the market steady. Raw materials have 
fluctuated within narrow limits, but no 
marked developments have been record- 
ed. Radiator valves are generally quot- 
ed at 58 per cent, off, as a result of the 
unsettlement referred to in recent mar- 
ket reports. 

VALVES— Per cent 

Compression work, standard 45 

Fuller work, standard 30 

Bath cocks, compression 4) 

Do., Fuller 26 

Flatway stop and wastecocks, stand'd. . 64 

Roundway stop and waste evens std 46 

Brass steam cocks, standard %" to 2" 60 

1D0.. 2%" to 3" 43 

Globe, angle and check valves, std 25 

Mueller globe, angle and check 26 

Mueller composition disc steam valves . . 33 

■l.M.T. valves, screwed 10 10 

J.M.T. gate valves, screwed 16 10 

Jenkins gate or straightway, screwed. ... 16 10 

Jenkins, globe, screwed 10 10 

Radiator valves, standard 58 

Do-, removable disc 58 

Emco, J. D.. rad. valves, screwed 33 

Emco swing check, %" and %" 40 

Do., other sizes 33 

Webber gate valves, screwed 33 

Bmco globe valves, std 

Emco globe valves, J.D., screwed . . . 
Basin Cocks — 

No. and 1 Fuller pattern 

Quick opening No. 3633 

No. 3623, plain or index handle 34 

Flanged Fittings 30 

Dart unions, blk., Vi to 2 in 34 

Do., % in., 2Vt to 4 in 28 

Do., galvd., add to black 30 

Nipples, blk., and galvd. % to 4 in. 

close and short 55 

Do., 4Vi in. and larger 46 

• Do., long, % in. to 4 in 60 

Do., 4V2 in. and larger 50 

Do., running thread 35 

Couplings, 4 in. and under 25 

Do., 4Vj in. and larger 5 

MALLEABLE FITTINGS' — 

New piece list, effective June 1. 1922. 
Discounts, Classes, A.B. and C, less 70 per cent. 



25 
33 



30 
50 



SATISFACTORY TRADE IN SOIL 
PIPE AND FITTINGS 

Toronto. 

Business in soil pipe and fittings is de- 
scribed as keeping up remarkably well 
for this time of the year. A brief re- 
view of trade during 1922 indicates that 
the volume of business has been of a 
more satisfactory nature, with good 
prospects ahead for the coming year. 
Prices remain on a firm basis, with little 
likelihood of change at present. While 
the current pig iron market is at easier 
levels than formerly, it is pointed out 
that existing quotations are no lower 
than was the case early in the fall when 
a revision in soil pipe discounts was put 
into effect. With raw materials gen- 
erally showing a firm trend and with 
labor costs on an equal basis, it is stated 
that production costs hardly permit of 
downward revisions at this time. Cur- 
rent quotations follow: 

SOIL PIPE— 

2 inch Less 33 1-3% 

3 inch Less 33 1-3% 

4 inch Less 33 1-8% 

5 and 6 inch Less 33 1-3% 

8 inch net 

FITTINGS— 

2 to 6 inch Less 45 per rent. 

8 inch fittings net. 



January 1, 1923 



33 



SPASMODIC TRADE NOTED IN 
BOILER TUBES 

Toronto. — — 

Current trade in boiler tubes is now 
stated to be of a spasmodic nature. The 
improvement in volume which was form- 
erly recorded has now subsided some- 
what, although fluctuations in the 
amount of business are more or less evi- 
dent- Prices ai'e continuing on a moder- 
ately steady basis, with the upward 
tendency still being recorded in certain 
primary centres owing to the somewhat 
uncertain future position of raw ma- 
terials. Domestic quotations remain un- 
changed at the following nominal levels: 
BOILER TUBES — 



Size Seamless. Lav-weld 

% inch J19 00 $ 

1 inch 20 00 

1% inch 22 00 

lVa inch 24 00 

1% inch 24 00 23 00 

2 inch 22 00 19 00 

2% inch 24 00 2>1 50 

2V 2 inch 27 00 23 50 

3 inch 34 00 28 50 

3% inch 36 00 33 00 

3V 2 inch 38 00 33 00 

4 inch 50 00 42 00 



SLIGHT BETTERMENT IN BRASS 
AND COPPER 

Toronto. 

With a slightly firmer attitude record- 
ed in primary metal centres, the condi- 
tions of brass and copper products is 
again stated to be on the road to im- 
provement. Current trade in sheets, rods 
and tubing is described as fairly good 
for this time of the year, and slightly 
better in volume than was evident a few 
weeks ago. This is attributed to the 
general improvement in business condi- 
tions, coupled with a more active in- 
terest in raw materials. Prices on these 
products remain unchanged at the fol- 
lowing levels: 



BRASS — 

Sheets base, per lb 23 

Rods, base, per lb 22 

Tubing, base, per lb 30 

COPPER — 

Rods, base, per lb 30 

Soft sheets, plain, 1 oz. and heavier, lb. 29 
Do., plain tinned. 16 oz. and heavier, 

per lb 36 

Do., polished, and tinned, 16 oz. and 

heavier, lb 41 

Tubing 33 



REVISION MAY DEVELOP IN 
CEMENT PRICES 
Toronto. — — 

That some minor revision may de- 
velop on cement quotations early in the 
New Year is the current opinion found 
in production centres. Prices on cement 
have remained on a steady basis for 
some time. There is very little moving 
at present, but business is described as 
normal and satisfactory for this season. 
Another brisk period of building ac- 
tivity is anticipated for 1923, witl^ some 
indication that large contruction work 
will be on a heavier scale than was the 
case in the past season. Prevailing 



quotations follow: 

CEMENT — 

Car load lots. Toronto. 

Per barrel, delivered 3 63 

Less car lots. 

Per barrel, f.o.b. yard 4 35 

Per barrel, delivered 4 55 



Single bags, $1.15 each; 4 bags to barrel. 
Extra charge of $1.60 per load on less than 24 
bag lots. 

Rebate of 20 cents for empty sacks. 



NO ACCUMULATION ON WROUGHT 
PIPE STOCKS 

Toronto. 

While the volume of business in 
wrought piping during the winter 
months is somewhat restricted on do- 
mestic markets, and is considerably re- 
duced during the holiday and inventory 
periods from the brisk activity recorded 
a couple of months ago, yet owing to a 
continued shortage in the supply of cer- 
tain raw material it is pointed out that 
mills are not able to accumulate any de- 
gree of stocks. This factor has also 
contributed towards the maintenance of 
firm price levels on pipe, while it is 
stated that for these reasons the prob- 
abilities are that deliveries will be slow 
during the early part of 1923. As point- 
ed out in previous reports, more activity 
has been recorded in smaller sizes of 
black and galvanized pipe due to the 
building boom of the dwelling house 
variety experienced in the past season. 
On the other hand, the movement of 
larger sizes, three inches and up, has 
been retarded because of the lack of in- 
dustrial building under construction. 
While quotations on wrought piping 
were advanced several times during the 
past year, each increase was of minor 
extent and the aggregate advance did 
not represent the proportion of higher 
costs in production fields. 

List No. 57 continues to govern the 
local market. 

WROUGHT PIPE 
Price List No. 57. November, 1922. 

Standard Buttweld Pipe S/C 
Per 100 ft. 

Steel Gen. Wrot. Iron 
Bile. Galv. Blk. Galv. 

Size 







6.00 


8.00 






¥4 




3.96 


6.00 


7.20 


9.30 


% 




3.96 


6.00 


7.20 


9.30 


% 




5.02 


6.55 


7.31 


8.93 


% 




6.10 


7.82 


8.86 


10.70 


i 




8.67 


11.22 


12.75 


15.47 


i% 




11.73 


15.18 


17.25 


20.93 


1V> 


in. 


14.03 


18.15 


20.63 


25.03 


2 


in. . 


18.87 


24.42 


27.75 


33.67 


2l/ 2 
3 




29.84 


38.61 






in. 


.'. 39.02 


50.49 






3Vo 
4 


in. . 


50.60 


64.40 






in. 


69.95 


76.30 










Standard Lapweld 


Pipe S/C 








Per 100 feet. 










Blk. 


Galv. 


Blk. 


Galv. 






Steel 


Gen. 


Wrot. 


Iron 


2 


in. 


22.20 


27.75 


31.08 


37.00 


2y 2 




32.76 


41.54 


46.80 


■56.16 


3 


in. 


42.84 


54.32 


61.20 


73.44 


3% 




51.52 


65.32 


73.60 


88.32 


4 


in. 


61.04 


77.39 


87.20 


104.64 


4% 




71.12 


90.17 


1.07 


1.27 


5 


in. 


82.88 


105.08 


1.24 


1.48 


6 




1.08 


1.36 


1.61 


1.92 


7 


in. . . 


1.40 


1.79 


2.07 


2.50 


8L 




1.48 


1.88 


2.18 


2.63 


8 


in. . 


1.70 


2.16 


2.51 


3.02 


9 






2.62 


2.97 


3.59 


10L 




1.92 


2.43 


2.82 


3.39 


10 


in. 


2.47 


3.13 


3.63 


4.37 



SEASONAL QUIETNESS IN LEAD 
AND ZINC GOODS 

Toronto. 

In lead and zinc goods the primary 
metals entering into production are de- 
scribed as just holding their own, and 
quotations on the finished products list- 
ed below have remained unchanged. Cur- 



rent trade is moderate, a condition usual- 
ly evident at this time of the year, when 
activity is light on account of inventory 
and holiday factors. Some variation is 
still noted in lead sheet prices, the range 
being between 9Vz and 10 cent per 
pound. Other quotations remain at the 
following levels: 

LEAD AND ZINC GOODS— 

Lead pipe, list, per lb 14 

Lead waste pipe, list, per lb 15 

Do., over 8 in., list, per lb 16 

Lead pipe is subject to a discount of ten per 
cent. 

jad traps and bends, less 15 per cent. 
Lead sheets, 4 to 6 lbs., sq. ft. in rolls, lb. 
$0.09V 2 —0.10. 

Cut sheets, l/>c to %c lb. extra and cut 
sheets to size, lc lb. extra. 



Solder wire, per lb 31 

Do., commercial, lb 25 

Do., strictly, lb 23% 

Do., guaranteed, lb 26V 2 

Do., wiping, lb 23V 2 

Zinc sheets, per lb 11 12 



SATISFACTORY VOLUME OF TRADE 
IN RADIATORS 

Toronto. 

The recent recovery in pig iron prices 
serves to strengthen the market, for rad- 
iators and boilers, while maintaining the 
steady to firm undertone formerly re- 
corded. Although current activity is 
moderate in extent, the prevailing price 
levels are unchanged, it being pointed 
out that no developments have occurred 
in basic elements. Referring to the vol- 
ume of business recorded this season, 
one manufacturer stated that heating 
systems had generally experienced a 
brisk demand over a period of several 
months and satisfaction was expressed 
with the movement up to this time. How 
records compared with former seasons 
was something not yet available, al- 
though the general opinion was that the 
movement was considerably heavier be- 
cause of the impetus afforded through 
the enlarged building activities. No 
changes are made in the following quo- 
tations: 

RADIATORS— 

Revised radiator list prices are for 1. 2. 3, 4 
and 5-eolumn radiators per square foot. 

38 in., $1; 32 in., $1.10; 30 in., $1.15; 26 in.. 
$1.20; 23 in., $1.26; 22 in., $1.30; 20 in., 4L36-; 
18 in., $1.40; 16 in., $1.50; 14 in., $1.55; 13 in.. 
$1.60. 

Discount on 2, 3. 4 and 5 column standard 
sizes, 55 per cent, for water and 56 per cent, for 
steam. 

Discount on 1-column standard size, and 2, 3, 
and 4-column hospital sizes 47 per cent for water 
and 48 per cent for steam. 

Discounts on 1-column hospital size, water 33' 
per cent. ; steam, 34 per cent 

Wall radiators— 5 ft.. $1.15; 6 ft.. $1.10; 7 
ft, $1.05; 9 ft, $1.05; 12 ft, $1.05. Discount 52. 
per cent 
BOILERS — 
Water: 

Round 60 per cent, off list Square 20 pel- 
cent, off list. 
Steam : 

Round, 25 per cent, off list; Square, 15 per 
cent, off list. 



POSSIBLE CHANGE FORESHADOW- 
ED IN CLOSETS 

Toronto. 

That some price revisions may de- 
velop early in the New Year on closets 
is the general opinion prevalent in the 
trade this week. In this connection, how- 
ever, it is stated that any movement to- 
wards easier levels would primarily de- 
pend upon manufacturers, as wholesalers 



34 



state that there is little profit in exist- 
ing figures. However, another distribu- 
tor expressed the opinion that it was 
quite possible quotations on closets would 
remain at existing levels, because it was 
felt that a steady market would be more 
conductive to active trade and restore 
confidence in future operations, rather 
than price fluctuations at this period. 

CLOSET COMBINATIONS- Each 

Closet, standard outfit, oak 26 00 

Do., with post hinge seat 26 20 

Do., mahogany Vitro or Pussyfoot with 

mahogany post hinge seat and cover 28 45 
Do., vitreous china, with oak post hinge 

seat and cover 28 45 

Do., vitreous china, with mahogany post 

hinge seat and cover 28 70 

Do., white Vitro or Pussyfoot, with oak 

post hinge seat and cover...: 28 45 

Do., white Vitro or Pussyfoot with ma- 
hogany post hinge, seat and cover. 28 70 
Do., enamelled iron tank with oak post 

hinge seat and cover 28 45 

Do., enamelled iron tank with ma- 
hogany post hinge seat and cover. . 28 70 
Additions or reductions to above: 

Add for reverse trap bowl 1 50 

Add for syphon jet bowl 7 00 

For % in. valve on supply pipe 1 50 

Deduct for supply pipe 60 

Deduct for floor flange and bolts 60 

CLOSET BOWLS— 

Washdown bowl with spud 10 60 

Reverse trap bowl, with spud 12 10 

Syphon jet bowl, with spud 17 00 

"Richelieu" bowl 10 50 

CLOSET TANKS, low down. Oak, Vitro 
or Pussyfoot tank, with fittings, less 

seat 13 20 

White Vitro or Pussyfoot tank with fit- 
tings, flush elbow and supply 15 65 

Vitreous china tank with fittings, flush 

elbow and supply 18 00 

Enamelled iron tank with fittings, flush 

elbow and supply 18 00 

CLOSET SEATS — 

Oak post hinge seat and cover 3 85 

Oak wood strip seat and cover 3 50 

Mahogany finish post hinge seat and 

cover . 4 05 

Oak Richelieu sent and cover 3 50 



QUIET PERIOD IN ENAMELED 
WARE TRADE 

Toronto 

There is now the customary quiet per- 
iod in enameled ware trade, which is de- 
scribed as seasonal for the winter ses- 
sion. There is, however, a moderate 
amount of activity recorded, as some 
finishing- work appears from time to 
time. No changes appear in quotations 
on these products, and the following are 
local list and discounts 

ENAMELED WARE— 

Enameled Iron Baths, 3" roll rim, 4 ft,. 

4 ft. 6 in., 5 ft 51 40 

Do.. 5V 2 ft 57 10 

Lavatories — 

17x10" Apron F139 or P4045 15 30 

18x24" Apron F154 or P3845 or P3847 23 60 

18x21" Apron F169 or P4205 17 60 

18x21" Roll Rim, F197, F199 or 

P4655-6 15 40 

17x19" Roll Rim, F241 or P4345 12 60 

Sinks, Roll Rim. 16x24 in 18 10 

Do., 18 x 30 in 23 00 

Do., 20 x 30 in 24 70 

Sinks, Flat Rim — 3 only 2 only 1 only 

16x24 $7 60 $7 70 S7 80 

18x30 8 50 8 60 8 70 

20x30 9 70 9 80 9 90 

Above prices, list, less 33 1-3 per cent. 

All steel enamel baths. 1 and 4V> ft $14.00 

Do., 5 ft 15 00 

Do., 5V, ft 1.6 75 

Steel bath cuctat'ons sire ret 



RAW MATERIAL TREND AFFECTS 
CORRUGATED 

Toronto. 

Chief interest in the corrugated sheet 
market at this time of the year centres 
around the trend of raw materials. In 



this respect it is pointed out that for a 
variety of reasons the supply of basic 
elements from a production viev/point, 
has continued somewhat difficult to ob- 
tain. This condition is reflected to an 
extent in the undertone of the market 
as affecting the finished product, and al- 
though little activity is evident at this 
season, yet existing price levels remain 
steady. Manufacturers point out that 
on the basis of raw material costs, ex- 
isting price levels are well down to re- 
placement values and firmness in quo- 
tations is expected to prevail during the 
initial quarter of the New Year. 

CORRUGATED SHEETS— Per 100 Sq. Ft. 

No. 28 gauge 6 50 

No. 26 gauge 7 00 

No. 26, U. S. gauge ■ 8 00 

No. 24 gauge 9 00 

No. 22 gauge 11 00 

No. 20 gauge 12 50 

No. 18 gauge 16 50 

Less 10 per cent. 

Lighter than 24 gauge and wider than 27 

inches, ?0.75 per square extra. 



NO CHANGES ANTICIPATED IN 
TROUGH AND PIPE 

Toronto. 

While trade in eavestrough and con- 
ductor piping and kindred lines is na- 
turally of a very light nature at this time 
of the year, yet conditions are described 
as fairly good. More interest is evident 
in the development of raw materials 
which may have a bearing on the future 
trend of price levels on these finished 
goods. At the present time, however, 
it is stated that no changes are anti- 
cipated, and the following quotations re- 
main unchanged: 

TROUGH (EAVE) — 
O. G. Square Bead— 

Per 100 ft. Per 100 ft. 

8 inch $15 90 15 inch $28 80 

10 inch 17 70 18 inch 36 80 

12 inch 21 20 

I). G. Round and Half Round 

8 inch 16 90 15 inch 29 80 

10 inch 18 70 18 inch 37 80 

12 inch 22 20 

Less 70 per cent. 
PIPE (CONDUCTOR) — 

Plain, round or corrugated. 

Per 100 ft. in 10 ft. length*. 

2 in., in 10 ft. lengths, list 18 40 

3 in., ii 10 ft. lengths, list 22 30 

4 in., in 10 ft. lengths, list 29 60 

5 in., in 10 ft. lengths, list 40 00 

5 in., in 10 ft. lengths 49 00 

Less 70 per cent. 
ELBOWS (CONDUCTOR)— 



inch, li 



list 5 25 

3 inch, list . . .' 6 00 

1 inch, list 10 50 

5 incn, list 24 00 

fi inch, list 29 00 

l ess 60 per cent. 



HOLIDAY SEASON IN IRON AND 
STEEL MARKET 

Toronto. 

Greater activity in the pig iron mar- 
kets, both domestic and outside, coupled 
with the local advance in price of $1.00 
per ton, is taken to indicate that finish- 
ed steel quotations are hardly likely to 
go any lower at present. It is pointed 
out that some lines of finished steel 
where price softness was formerly mark- 
ed, now appear on a firmer basis due to 
improved booking operations in certain 
quarters. Another favorable aspect of 
the current market situation is the great- 
er confidence which is being displayed 



in obligations for material for forward 
delivery at prevailing price levels. Local 
business is described as good for this 
time of the year, in spite of the holiday 
season, inventory period and winter dull- 
nes. Prices are unchanged, as fol- 
lows: 

IRON AND STEEL— 

Mild steel bars, base 3 25 3 40 

Mild steel bands, 3-16 base ... 3 75 3 90 

Bar iron, base 3 25 3 40 

Angle, iron base 3 35 3 50 

Horseshoe iron 3 90 

Tire steel 3 50 

Spring steel . . . 7 00 8 00 

Sleigh shoe steel 3 40 

Toe caulk iron 4 10 

Hoop Steel . . . , 4 76 

Norway iron 12 60 

Crucible cast sheet steel 28 00 

Mining Drill steel 18 50 

Cast tool steel, high grade , 30 00 



BOOKING WELL AHEAD ON SHEETS 
AND PLATES 

Toronto. 

While current trade in sheets is de- 
scribed as moderately quiet at this per- 
iod of the year, it is also pointed out 
that mills are still considerably behind 
on deliveries, and bookings are now be- 
ing placed in some cases for March busi- 
ness. Quotations remain unchanged, 
both on domestic and primary markets, 
with prevailing market tendencies being 
closely watched. Prices on plates now 
show a narrower range, and the opinion 
has been expressed that the recent re- 
covery in pig iron, although of slight ex- 
tent, contains some indication of the de- 
velopments in semi-finished steel pro- 
ducts. 

GALVANIZED SHEETS— 

Premier and Apollo 
10% oz 6 65 

U. S. 28 base 6 25 

U. S. 26 base 6 95 

22 and 24 5 80 

18 and 20 5 65 

16 6 50 

12 and 14 5 35 

Queen's Head 

28 gauge base 7 15 

26 6 75 

24 6 45 

22 6 30 

Fleur de Lis 

28 gauge, base 6 90 

26 6 50 

24 6 20 

22 6 05 

An extra 40c. per 100 lbs. is charged for Key- 
stone and Premier 'bands copper-bearing sheets. 

An extra is now charged on galvanized sheets. 
10% oz. and 28 ga., when shipped out in sheets 
3 feet wide. The extra charged over prices shown 
in 20c. per 100 pounds. 
BLUE ANNEALED SHEETS — 

10 gauge, base 4 20 

12 gauge 4 25 

14 gauge 4 30 

16 gauge 4 35 

BLACK SHEETS— 

18-20 gauge 4 90 

22-24 gaUge 4 95 

26 gauge 5 00 

28 gauge 5 10 

A charge of 25c. per 100 lbs. is made for less 
.than case lots. An extra 10c. per 100 lbs. is 
also charged on sheets 26 in. wide. 
PLATES. CANADA— Per box 

Ordinary, 52 sheets 4 90 

Dull, 60 sheets '. 5 00 

Blued and oiled, boxes 52's 5 50 

Do., boxes, 60's 5 60 

WELSH CANADA PLATES— 

Cold polished, 18 x 24. 52's 6 25 

Cold polished, 18 x 24, 60's 6 50 

PLATES, COKE TON- 
IC, 20 x 28, 112 sheets 12 45 

IX. 20 x 28. 112 sheets 15 00 

IX, 20 x 28, 56 sheets 8"50 

PLATES, CHARCOAL TIN — 

IX, 20 x 28, 112 sheets 10 00 

IXX. 20 x 28. 56 sheets 12 00 

PLATES. TERNE — 

IC. 14 x 20 112 sheets 12 00 

(continued on page 36) 




Put Your Problems Up To Mueller Experts 

Tell us what you wish to accomplish. Send us all the details of your job. Mueller 
experts will figure out your problems and send you free of charge full information 
as to the most efficient way to achieve your desired results. 

To insure service every valve in your installation must meet the requirements of 
type and conditions. They must be correctly installed and properly protected by 
strainer. 

Mueller Regulators and Strainers 

are suitable for water, steam, air, gas, oil and ammonia. They meet requirements 
and when properly installed are warranted to give satisfactory service. 

H. MUELLER MFG. CO., LIMITED, SARNIA, ONT. 

Water, Plumbing and Gas Brass Goods and Tools. 
American Factory at Decatur, 111., U. S. A. Branches, New York and San Francisco 

Mueller Metals Co.. Pt. Huron, Mich.. Makers of "Red Tip" Brass Rod; Brass and Copper Tubing; 
Forgings and Castings in Brass, Bronze and Aluminum; also Screw Machined Products. 



Illllllllllllllll 



36 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



January 1, 192:5 



TORONTO MARKETS 

(Continued from page 34) 

FIRM UNDERTONE TO RANGE 
BOILERS 

Toronto. 

While trade in range boilers is sea- 
sonably quiet at this period, yet the 
undertone of the market continues quite 
firm. Current discounts remain un- 
changed, and it is stated by manufac- 
turers and distributors that little change 
is anticipated for the opening- weeks of 
the New Year at least. Prices remain 
unchanged at the following levels: 

RANGE BOILERS— 

.Size. . List Price. 

5-gallon $13 50 

12 to 15 gallon 14 00 

IS-gallon 15 00 

2C>-gallon 16 50 

30-gallon 17 50 

35-gaIlon 20 50 

40-gallon 22 7 r- 

52-gallon 38 00 

6«-gallon GO 75 

K2-gal!on 74 00 

100-gallon 103 00 

120-gallon 117 00 

1 14-caIlon 1G4 00 

IfiS-rnllon 187 00 

"•*-i(iUJnn 210 00 

Discounts. Standard weight, 40 per cent. 
Extra heavy. 30 per cent. 



BETTER FEELING REMAINS IN 
INGOT METALS 

Toronto. 

There is a better feeling generally 
evident throughout the ingot metal 
group, but no great changes are record- 
ed. There is little trading at this per- 
iod, due to holidays and inventory needs. 
Prices have remained on a fairly steady, 
basis, both in domestic and primary mar- 
kets. 

COPPER.— The undertone of copper 
is decidedly stronger, with the pendulum 
now commencing another upward swing. 
While domestic price levels are un- 
changed, as yet, it is noted that United 
States quotations are slightly higher, 
while any corresponding advance in 
London is tempei - ed by exchange condi- 
tions. 

TIN. — This metal continues on a 
strong basis. Tin prices are again show- 
ing an inclination to rise, both in London 
and the S. markets. Sentiment is 
described as much more cheerful. Do- 
mestic quotations remain fairly steady, 
local levels being given below. 

LEAD. — The general tone of the mar- 
ket for lead is steady to firm, with no 
great developments expected at this time 
of the year, due to the holiday and in- 
ventory interest. While the aspect of 
this market has lately shown temporary 
periods of listlessness, with a slight 
wavering in primary quotations, the 
large and steady consumption that is go- 
ing on is pointed out as maintaining- a 
sound underlying position. 

SPELTER. — This metal continues 
quiet with very little change in either 
prices or market conditions. The present 
tone is quiet, a condition not unusual at 
this season. London prices are report- 
ed as slightly firmer, but this trend is 
not reflected in domestic circles. 

ANTIMONY.— The market undertone 
in antimony has remained dull. In the 



absence of any trading to speak of, 
prices have remained unchanged, both on 
primary and domestic markets. 

ALUMINUM. — Inquiries are stated to 
have been more numerous for aluminum, 
but it is noted that actual transactions 
are relatively light. Prices are firm and 
unchanged from previous levels: 

INGOT METALS— 



Copper 17 25 

Tin 41 00 

Lead 7 50 

Spelter 9 50 

Antimony 8 50 

Aluminum 22 00 



"KUMING TO LOGERHEDS OVER 
BIZNESS EXPANSION" 

(Continued from page 17) 

"Sum peeple think their all fired 
smart" she sez snappy like, "and don't 
half to half there heds red" lookin plum 
at my aubern lox. 

"Its a little two thick for me," I sez 
in self defence, referrin to the lion of 
affluvia doap Bill had been handin me. 

"What iz," she sez "youre hed?" 

"Aw Vilet lay off, that's not fare," I 
remonstraits. 

"Well its lite anyway," she comes 
back. 

Vilet always gets me goin, I didn't 
know vvheather she me-nt my hare or 
my hed. So I sed nothin. 

"If you could only reed," she contin- 
juse with a sort of pityin voice, "you 
might lern, for nobody can tell you 
nothin." 

The swet begin to bust out on my 
foarhed for if they res 1 thing I don't 
like its to have Vilet roast me. 

You know I can reed Al only some 
of the words is strange thow the dic- 
tionery she give me helps a lot. 
. "If youd leeve the sportin page aloan 
and forget some of the things you done 
on the Polo Field and read some of this 
literatctoor about what your goin to do 
on the dispozle field, youd get some- 
whear." 

What Ime goin to do on the dispozle 
field! Thats just like Vilet she jest 
lays down the law as to what Ime goin 
to do, and befoar I no Ime doin it. 

Thats the way it was with the dis- 
pozle feeld. I was skeered stiff Bill 
was goin to bite off more than he could 
chew and that he wood get all balled 
up with all those cheimbers and Annie 
Robic. But I begin to study and befoar 
long I becaim a ferm bleever. 

One day I come into the shop with 
a good one to spring. 

"Ive found out who Annie Robic is," I 
sez to Vilet. 

"Oh have you?" she sez, "who is she?" 

"The Cheimber Made,"and I laffed fit 
to split. 

"Fresh," sez Vilet and tossed her hed. 

Well Al we hev been bizzy as beevers 
all threw the dull seezen workin on 
rurail work. Bill phoned he had the 
goods and all the fo'ks is what Teddy 
Roosevelt used to say "Deelighted. 
Yours till the next. Jerry. 



PROFITABLE FIELD FOR 
PLUMBER 

(Continued from page 16) 

Flush-ometers 

One place was found when; the 
flush-ometers were not operating well 
on account of low pressure. This factory 
uses reclaim water and only the top 
floor of the building was affected. How- 
ever, they are raising a storage tank on 
the roof to ovei-come this difficulty. 

General Sanitation 

Dark lavatories are usually dirty lav- 
atories. Too much cannot be said about 
lots of light. If stairways and halls are 
painted white around the corners people 
will hesitate to spit there. Some fac- 
tories have their stair landings in this 
way and also have cuspidors at con- 
venient intervals. It is remarkable what 
a change it is from a tobacco juice cor- 
ner sometimes found. 

Many Plumbing Defects 

To give you some idea of what has 
been accomplished by our division of the 
department of public health in Toronto in 
connection with improving the condition 
of our factories, public buildings, apart- 
ment houses, etc., from a sanitary and 
hygenic standpoint, I may tell you that 
last year we dealt with 165 buildings 
with defective drainage, and 653 build- 
ings which had defective plumbing 
work, all of which have been made san- 
itary, either by repairs or reconstruc- 
tion. In addition to these, we have the 
ventilation improved in 80 factories; 
urinals, sinks, basins and shower baths 
to the number of 175 installed, drink- 
ing bubblers installed in 72 cases; gases 
and chemicals controlled in 98, and trade 
dusts wholly or partly controlled in 159. 
Now this will give a general idea of our 
part of the work. 

I may say that it is my opinion that 
all sanitary engineers should co-operate 
with the city health authorities in an en- 
deavor to have all plumbing work, and 
drainage not only installed in first class 
manner but they should do all they can 
to see that it is kept in the best pos- 
sible state, as the public places a lot 
of confidence in them, and depend large- 
ly upon them to see that their health is 
not affected from bad odors arising from 
leaky work and filthy fixtures. They 
should also remember that the insp3ctor 
is not there to hinder them, but only to 
see that their work has been done right. 

Remembering what our object should 
be, prevention rather than cure, I may 
say right here that any person undertak- 
ing to do plumbing and drainage work 
without the necessary training and qual- 
ifications is like a person performing a 
serious operation without the proper 
training in surgical work. 



January 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 




Page Mr. Plumber 

When the thermometer drops be- 
low the 30 line the frozen plumb- 
ing job is the order of the day. 

HERCULES DRAIN PIPE SOL- 
VENT is the only practical and 
profitable method of working the 
job efficiently. Produces tremend- 
ous heat — thaws all the way down. 

NO FUMES-WORKS WITH COLD WATER 
Sold Only to the Plumbing Trade At Your Jobbers 

Distributor : 
W. H. CUNNINGHAM & HILL, Ltd. 
Western Canada Representative: Eastern Canada Representative: 
W. F. HILL, JR. A. H. WHEELER 

268 Carlton St., Winnipeg. Man. 326 Selby St.. Westmount. Montreal, Que 
Phone A 6237. Phone, Westmount 1376. 



Advancement 
for Plumbers and Fitters 

Our School of Plumbing, Heating and 
Ventilation presents excellent opportuni- 
ties to the ambitious contractor, master 
plumber or apprentice in the Plumbing, 
Heating and Gas-fitting trades. 

The instruction of the I. C. S. Complete 
Plumbing and Heating Course, embodying 
the most exhaustive exposition of the 
principles a.nd practice of plumbing, heat- 
ing, gas-fitting and ventilation ever pre- 
pared, fully meets the requirements of 
those in the Trade who wish to advance 
to positions of greater responsibility, who 
wish to acquire ability to design and esti- 
mate on all kinds of plumbing, heating and 
ventilating systems for all classes of work. 

Write Vocational Director, giving par- 
ticulars of present employment and you 
will receive information and advice in ac- 
cordance with your requirements. 

International Correspondence Schools, 
Canadian, Limited 

Department 1822 Montreal, Canada 



The Everlasting 
Veneer Toilet Seat 




Strong, Clean 
Hygienic 

This reliable, dependable 
toilet seat is made of r i 
and 9-ply, air-seasoned 
wood veneer, held to- 
gether by our special 
wood cement. This ce- 
ment is proof against 
heat, cold or dampness. 
The veneering is distri- 
buted according to the 
strain and wear required 
of the different parts. 
The Everlasting Seat will 
never crack, warp or 
split. 



It is a splendid seat for use in cold, damp basements 
where closets must be installed. The Everlasting Toilet 
Seat will meet, and successfully resist, these severe con- 
ditions of moisture, changing temperature, etc. 



Canadian 
Veneering Company, 
Incorporated 

Acton Vale Quebec 




The GREAT POINT about 

BURNHAM GRATES 

The great point is that they operate in 
two sections — front half and back half. 
This takes the back "breaks" out of 
shaking, but puts savings into coal bills. 
Grates operating half at a time mean 
that you can have only half a fire when 
you don't need a whole one. 



Send for our booklet about this. 



ord,& |^ornham(a 




limited 
o^Canada 



(Boiler Department) 



Harbor Com. Bldg., 
Toronto. 




Factory — St. Cath- 
arines. Ontario. 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



January 1, 1923 



SAL ADA TEA 
BUILDING 
MONTREAL 



DENSMORE & LECLEAR 
Boston, Mass. 
Architects 



CRANE 

Sanitation 
Fixtures 




are designed to meet every requirement, condition 
and taste. They reflect a distinct advance in sani- 
tation fixtures of permanent wearing qualities and 
are installed in homes, schools, hotels, office build- 
ings, hospitals, parks, railway stations, churches, 
playgrounds, and many other public and private 
institutions. 



Manufacturers of Valves, Fittings and Piping Equipment for all pressures and 
purposes — and distributors of Pipe, Plumbing and Heating Supplies. 



Branches and Warehouses: 
HALIFAX, OTTAWA, TORONTO, 
HAMILTON, LONDON, WINNIPEG, 
REGINA, CALGARY, VANCOUVER. 



Sales Offices: 
ST.JOHN,N.B.,QUEBEC,SHERBROOKE, 
EDMONTON, VICTORIA, 
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA. 



CRANE 

LIMITED 

HEAD OFFICE &. SHOW ROOMS 
386 BEAVER HALL SQUARE 

MONTREAL 

Works 

1280 ST. PATRICK ST. 
MONTREAL 



CRANE- BENNETT 

LIMITED 

Head Office and Warehouse: 
LONDON, ENGLAND. 



Sales Offices: 
BIRMINGHAM, CARDIFF, 
GLASGOW, LEEDS, MANCHESTER. 



5 

I 



January 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and S t e am f i t t e r 



39 




HE 
1/ 
GO 



E 

D 

:R 



gBllllil!lii!lll!!!ll!llil!!l!ll!!!llll 



Few people realize the tremendous selling power of classified adver- 
tising or the exceptional opportunity which it offers. 

Hundreds of Sanitary Engineers to-day are carrying equipment for 
which they have no further need, yet many others could use this 
same equipment to good advantage and would be glad to buy at a 
fair price, if they but knew of it. 

How to get buyer and seller together — that's the question. The 
answer is — SANITARY ENGINEER classified advertising service. 
Thousands of Sanitary Engineers throughout the country read the 
classified advertisements every issue. That's why they produce 
results surely and quickly. 

If you want to buy, sell or exchange equipment. 

If you want to sell or exchange your store. 

If you want to buy a store. 

If you are looking - for a location. 

If you need a competent journeyman. 

If you are seeking a position. 

In fact if you wish to buy, sell or exchange anything used in a 
plumbing and steamfitting shop or for any reason desire to quickly 
get in touch with other Sanitary Engineers, use SANITARY 
ENGINEER'S classified advertising service. The charge is ridic- 
ulously low — $1.50 for twenty-five words, 5 cents for each additional 
word. 



Look For The Classified Column 

on Page 46 



40 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



January 1, 192$ 




AIR LINE SYSTEMS 

C. A. Dunham, Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., Man- 
chester, Eng. 
ALUMINUM CASTINGS 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd 1 ., Toronto. 
AIR VALVES 

Beaton & Caldwell Mfg. Co., New Britain, 
Conn. 

W. H. Cunningham & HU1, Ltd., Toronto. 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Sarnia, Ont. 

J. H. Wiliams Co., Brooklyn. New York. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., Man- 
chester. Eng. 

Wallaceburg Brass & Iron Mfg. Co., Ltd., Wal- 
Iaceburg, Ont. 

Wolverine Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 
BATHROOM FITTINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Gendron Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
BENDING SPRINGS 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

BOILERS. STEAM OR HOT WATER 

Gurney Foundry Co., Limited. Toronto. 
Lord & Burnham Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 
Spencer Heiter Co., Ltd.. Toronto, Ont. 
Warden King, Ltd., Montreal. 

BOILER FEED REGULATORS 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

C. A. Dunham Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
BOILER STANDS 

Fittings. Limited, Oshawa. 
BOLTS, EYE 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
BOLTS AND NUTS 

Fittings Limited. Oshawa. 
BRASS GOODS, VALVES, ETC. 

Canadian Brass Co.. Ltd.. Gait, Ont. 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg.. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 

Gait Brass Co., Limited, Gait. 

Kerr Engine Co., Ltd., Walkerville. 

James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co.. Toronto 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

United Brassfounders and Engineers, Ltd , 
Manchester, Eng. 
Wallaceburg Brass & Iron Mfg. Co., Ltd,. Wal- 
laceburg, Ont. 

Wolverine Ltd.. Toronto, Ont. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto 
BRASS PIPE AND TUBE 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto- 
Empire Mfg. Ltd., London and Toronto 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 

Wolverine. Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 
CASTINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 
CELLAR DRAINERS 

Gait Brass Co., Limited, Gait. 

Empire Mfg. Ltd., London and Toronto. 

James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto, and 
Hamilton. 
CIRCULATORS 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
CHAINS 

Fittings. Limited, Oshawa. 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
CLOSETS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
. Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

Gait Brass Co., Limited, Gait. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg., Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 



CONDENSATION UNITS 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

The Westco Pumps, Limited, Toronto. 

> < 23 River Street. Toronto. 

COUNTRY RESIDENCE EQUIPMENTS 

Empire Mfg Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 
! Mueller Mfg Sarnia. Ont. 
COUPLINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Fittings Limited Oshawa. 

DAMPER REGULATORS 

C. A. Dunham Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 

DRAINAGE FITTINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd . Toronto. 



M!"e Co.. Ltd London and Toronto. 



Fittings Limited. Oshawa. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co. Ltd.. Sarnia. Ont. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co. Ltd.. Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

Un'ted Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., Man- 
chester. Eng. 
Warden King, Ltd., Montreal. 
DPMN pi™* 1 SOLVENT 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill. Ltd.. Toronto. 
Hercules Chemical Co.. Inc., New York City. 
DRINKING FOUNTAINS 

Canada Metal Co.. Ltd., Toronto 
Emp ; re Mfg. Co., Ltd.. London and Toronto. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd.. Sarnia. Ont. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg., Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 
Hamilton. 
DROP FORGINGS 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn. N Y 
EJECTORS. STEAM 

Kerr Engine Co.. Walkerville. 
United Brassfounders & Engineers. Ltd.. 
Manchester. Eng. 
ENAMELWARE 

Amherst Foundry Co., Ltd.. Amherst. N.S. 
Canada Metal Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 
Emnire M f g Co.. Ltd.. London and Toronto. 
Gait Brass Co.. Limited, Gait. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd.. Sarnia, Ont. 
Standard San : tnry Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

Port Hope Sanitary Mfg. Co.. Ltd . Port Hope 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co.. Ltd. Toronto. 
EI FCTRIC PUMPING MACHINERY 

Empire M f g Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Sarnia. Ont. 
EXPANSION TANKS 

Toronto Hardware Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 
FITTINGS 

Canada Metal Co.. Ltd., Toronto 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

Fittings Limited. Oshawa. 

James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co.. Toronto. 

H Mueller M'e. Co . Ltd.. Sarnia. Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester. Eng. 

Warden King Ltd.. Montreal. 
FLUSHOMETERS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd . Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

Gait Brass Co . Ltd., Gait 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Sarnia. Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

Wolverine Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 
FLOOR AND CEILING PLATES 

Beaton & Cadwell Mfg. Co., New Britain. Conn. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

Fittings, Limited. Oshawa. 

Wolverine Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
FURNACES 

Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto. 

Warden King, Ltd., Montreal. 

Spencer Heater Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Hamilton Stove & Heater Co.. Homilton. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne, Hamilton. 

Hall-Zryd, Hespeler, Ont. 

Vulcan Co., London, Ont. 
GASOLINE ENGINES 

Empire Mfg. Co.. Ltd., London and Toronto. 



GAS WATER HEATERS 

Bastian-Morley. Limited. Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 
James Morrison Brass Mfg., Toronto. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
GALVANIZING 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 
HEAT GENERATORS 

Gait Brass Co., Gait, Ont. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronco. 
HEATING APPARATUS 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
HEATERS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronoo. 

Lord & Burnham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Warden King, Ltd., Montreal and Toronto. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
HEATING SYSTEMS 

C. A. Dunham Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
HOIST HOOKS 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
JAPANNING 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 
KEROSENE WATER HEATERS 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toromo. 
LAUNDRY TUBS 

The Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 
LEAD 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 
H Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto, 
Hamilton. 
MACHINISTS' TOOLS 

J. H. Williams & Co.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

MALLEABLE IRON CASTINGS 

Gurney Foundry Co.. Limited, Toronto. 
Fittings, Limited. Oshawa. 
MACHINE BOLTS AND NUTS 
Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 

MIXING VALVES 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

Port Hope Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Port Hope. 
PACKING 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
RADIATOR FOOT RESTS 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

Wolverine Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

PACKLESS RADIATOR VALVES 

Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville. 
C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 
PIPE AND RADIATOR HANGERS 

Beaton & Cadwell Mfg. Co., New Britain, 

Conn. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

Healy-Ruff Company, Minneapolis, Minn. 
PIPE, BLACK AND GALVANIZED 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Canadian Tube and Iron Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 
PIPE CLEANSER 

Chamberlain Desolvo Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto- 
Hercules Chemical Co., Inc., New York City. 

Wolverine, Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

PIPE JOINT COMPOUNDS 

Wolverine, Ltd.. Toronto, Ont. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 



January 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



41 



BEAVER BRAND 

Porcelain Enamel Ware 

Your Guarantee of Quality 

Beaver Brand Enamelware by its ability to meet the 
highest demands for service under all conditions, 
has established itself in the confidence of the public 
to such an extent that each month witnesses an ever- 
increasing demand for products of Beaver manu 
facture. 

. Amherst Foundry Co., Limited 

General Offices and Factory: Amherst, N.S. 



Agents: 



ONTARIO: 
Monarch Brass Mfg. Co., 
71 Brown St., Toronto 



MANITOBA AND NORTHWEST 
E. B. Plewes, 
197 Princess St., Winnipeg 




No. 34 



ad 





KERR VALVES 

For Steam and 
Hot Water Heating 

Kerr Radiator Valves need no introduction. They have been 
setting a standard of quality and efficiency in connection with 
Hot Water and Steam heating for many years, and continue as 
recognized leaders in this line of valves. 

Kerr Valves on your Radiator is a stamp of quality 
on the job. 

Ask your jobber for KERR valves- He likely has 
them in stock. 

Kerr N. P. Union Elbows register with either the Hot 
Water or the Steam Valve, and are of same standard 
high quality. 



ST/ie KERR ENGINE COMPANY 



!l! 



7 




No. 39 



WALKERVILLL 



LIMITED 

Valve Manufacturers 



ONTARIO 



\ 



12 



Sanitary E 



ngineer. Plumber and S 



TEAMFITTER January 1, 192:3 



PIPE, SOIL AND FITTINGS 

Anthes Foundry Co., Toronto and Winnipeg- 
Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 
Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd.. Sarnia, Ont. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

Toronto Hardware Mfg., Co.. Toronto. 

Warden King, Ltd., Montreal. 
PIPE THREADING TOOLS AND MACHINERY 

Borden Canadian Co., Toronto. 

A. B. Jardine & Co., Hespeler. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
PIPE WRENCHES 

J. H. Williams Co., Brooklyn, New York. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill. Ltd., Toronto. 

PLUMBERS' TOOLS 

J. H. Williams & Co., Montreal, Que. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
PNEUMATIC WATER SUPPLY TANKS 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 
PORCELAIN WARE 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
PUMPS 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co.. 23 River Street, Toronto. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Limited. 

The West co Pumps Limited, Toronto. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
PUMPING SYSTEMS, AUTOMATIC 

Canada Metal Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 
H. Muteller Mfg. Co.. Limited. 

The Westco Pumps. Limited, Toronto. 

Beaton & Cadwell Mfg. Co., New Britain. Conn. 
RADIATORS 

Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto. 

Lord & Burnham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Warden King Ltd., Montreal. 
RADIATOR HANGERS 

Healy Ruff Company. 
RADIATOR NIPPLES 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 
RADIATOR TRAPS (STEAM) 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co.. 23 River Street. Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers Ltd.. Man- 
chester, Eng. 



RIVETS 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 

RANGE BOILERS 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

The Canadian John Wood Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Toronto Hardware Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
REDUCING PRESSURE VALVES 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd.. 
Manchester, Eng. 
RETURN TILTING TRAPS 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 

ROOF FLANGES AND FLASHINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto, 
Hamilton. 

SEPTIC TANK VALVES AND SYPHONS 

Anthes Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

SINK BRACKETS 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 

SOCKETS, WIRE ROPE 

J. H. Williams & Co., Montreal, Que. 
SOLDER 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
STEAM SPECIALTIES 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
STEAM TRAPS 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
STOVES 

Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto. 
STOVES. GAS AND COAL 

Gurney Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
SWIVELS, HOOK 

J. H. Williams & Co.. Brooklyn, N.Y. 
TANKS, STEEL 

The Canadian John Wood Mfg. Co., Toronto. 



TANK BULBS, (RUBBER) 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
THUMB SCREWS AND NUTS 
J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

TOOLS 

Wolverine, Ltd., Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn. N.Y. 
W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
TORCHES 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto 
UNIONS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
VAPOR HEATING SYSTEMS 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
VISES, CHAIN, CLAMP, MOUNT 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
VITRO TANKS 

Gait Brass Co., Ltd., Gait. 
VACUUM SYSTEMS OF HEATING 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
VALVES 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 
Jenkins Bros., Ltd., Montreal, Que. 
The Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
United Brassfounders & Engineers Ltd., 

Manchester, Eng. 
WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Hamilton. 

The Westco Pumps, Limited, Toronto. 
WASHERS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill. Ltd., Toronto 
WASHING MACHINES 

Gurney Foundry Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 
WRENCHES, SET, DROP FORGED, 
ENGINEERS, SOCKET AND CHAIN PIPE 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn. N.Y. 
WROUGHT COUPLINGS AND NIPPLES 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Fittings, Ltd., Oshawa. 




And there are no better tools than WILLIAMS' 
Hammers. All kinds; all sizes. Catalog on request. 

J. H. WILLIAMS & Co., Limited 

"The Drop- Forging People." 

77 Thorold Road - St. Catharines, Ont. 




These machines are used in many of the 
largest industrial plants returning con- 
densation from Heating and Steam pro- 
cess work under various conditions. 

It will pay Heating Contractors to give 
more attention to the utility of our re- 
turn traps. 

They save coal, raise efficiency and for 
this reason are steadily superseding 
Boiler Feed and Vacuum Pumps. 

Send us your next prospect, also send us 
your trouble jobs of heating or other 
steam work. 

J. E. FARRELL, Director of Sales 

210 Galley Ave. Toronto 



January 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND SlEAMFITTER 



43 






FITTINGS LIMITED 

OSHAWA, CAN. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

M©MD 8B PIPE FITTINGS 





Take a 
TRIMO 
with you! 




Probably you are starting off on your 
way to an important job this morn- 
ing. If you consider it as important 
as you should, a reliable wrench will 
not be overlooked as one of your nec- 
essities. 

And a "Trimo" is what you need. 
The Wrench with the Steel Frames, 
Nut Guards, and insertable -jaw in 
handle. Made with Wood Handles 
in 6 . 8", 10", 14' sizes. 

Made with Steel Handles in all sizes. 



Trimont Manufacturing Company 

55-77 Amory Street 
Roxbury (Boston), Mass., U.S.A. 

- CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVE: 

GEO. P. FRASER, 28 Temple Ave. 

TORONTO. 



THE TRADE 

Is Respectfully Cautioned 
to specify 

RIVETED 
RANGE BOILERS 

Made by the old reliable 

TORONTO HARDWARE 
MFG. CO., LIMITED 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



January 1, 1923 



Who Paid for It? 



In an authoritative magazine we read: 

"A certain house eight years ago did an annual business of $3,000,000 
and the cost of selling the goods amounted to 8 per cent. Good ad- 
vertising has since then increased their annual business to $15,000,- 
000 and the cost of selling, including advertising expenditures, has 
fallen to 5 per cent. The salesmen are earning much more money, 
and the advertising has enabled them to do it, because while their 
commissions are smaller their sales are made easier and are more 
than trebled in volume." 



tl It H 



Who paid for the advertising? 

Not the consumer, for the price 
of the goods was less than it had 
been without advertising. 

Not the manufacturer, because 
his total selling cost was 3 per- 
cent, less. 

Not the salesmen, because they 
made more money. 

Who did pay, then? The same 
inexhaustible source upon which 
we draw for the cost of all progress 
—Old Man Waste. 

The most expensive institution 
we have to-day is the unsuccessful 



competitor — the business that 
drags along for years, eating up 
rent and salaries, and traveling ex- 
penses, trying to get orders that 
someone else can get and execute 
better and cheaper. 

It is cruel, perhaps, but true that 
the sooner such concerns disap- 
pear, the better it is for the public. 
The advertising of their more ag- 
gressive and better-organized com- 
petitors brings the end quicker. 
And it is the money saved by put- 
ting a stop to hordes of these petty, 
wasteful non-successes, which 
pays for the advertising and cuts 
down the cost of the goods you buv. 



January 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitii. k 



45 




TRY IT ! The E-Z Radiator Hanger 



You'll only have to try it once because it always works satisfactorily and 
ihere is a demand for more all the time. 

It hangs radiators securely and is a real device to give a neat and complete 
finish to the interior of every home. 

The E. Z. Radiator Hanger has one Bolt, Invisible Washer, Horizontal 
Adjustment, Vertical Adjustment, Baseboard Adjustment. 
Matte for Wall and Column Radiators. 

IMMEDIATE SHIPMENTS FROM LARGE STOCK. 



MADE IN CANADA 



HEALY-RUFF CO. 



J. H. Leonard, Tribune Bldg., Winnipeg 

D. G. Brison. Standard Bank Building. 
Vancouver. 

A. Walker, 514 McLean Bldg., Calgary. 

E. T. Flanigan. 229 College St., Tor- 
onto. 



MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Eaoer Coombs & Co., Ltd.. Halifax, 
Can. 

Shaver Bros., Booth Bldg., Ottawa. 
S. T. Hadley, 304 University St., 
Montreal. 




"Style R. 



They Always 

Call Again 



The merchant may be sure 
when he sells an article bear- 
ing this mark: 




that his customers will call 
again. In every Gendron pro- 
duct there is: 

Conscientious Manufacture 
and Fair Price, and for the 
dealer a splendid margin of 
profit. 




The Gendron Mfg. Co. Ltd. 

Duchess Street - Toronto* 




The Marvel, extra heavy and electric 
welded, is as efficient in operation 
as it is simple to install. 

It is a combined range boiler and 
gas water heater doing away entire- 
ly with the old side-arm combination. 

It holds and consumes every unit of 
heat, thereby needing less gas; the 
special Marvel burner produces a 
green-blue flame that heats the en- 
tire capacity of the tank in a very 
short time. It is silent, odorless 
and safe. 

It is sold only through plumbers and 
yields a generous profit. 

Write for prices 

IP 7 BASTIAN-MORLEY Limited 

195 Victoria St. - Toronto 





ATTENTION! Contract Shops, Stores, Employers, Clerks, Mechanics, etc. 

Our new HOME STUDY course in BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION is now ready for 
the trade. It teaches you the most modern methods of Business. 

Learn to extend your Markets; enlarge your Business; Learn to adjust all the business 
combinations to the limit. We build on top of your present Ability and give you a 
business training equal to the best. 

We teach you in your own home or office, Clear, Personal, Direct. An Hour a Day 
will prepare you into a highly specialized Executive. Make ready for the next great 
prosperous Building wave. 

Full information free. 
COURSES IN MODERN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
COURSES IN SHEET METAL DESIGN AND PATTERN DRAFTING 
COURSES IN HEATING AND VENTILATING ENGINEERING 



ST. LOUIS TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 



4543 Clayton Ave. 



O. W. Kothe, Prin. 



St. Louis, Mo. 



46 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter January 1, 1923 



Good Plumbing 

Calls For 

JENKINS VALVES 




Fig. 106 
Jenkins Brass Globe Valve 

What makes Jenkins Valves so 
much better than ordinary valves 
is — 

The high-grade Brass, Iron 
or Cast Steel from which 
they are made. 

The scientific way in which 
they are constructed. 

The scrupulous care with 
which every valve is tested 
for service before leaving 
the factory. 

Jenkins Valves are DEPENDABLE even 
under unusually severe conditions. 

Plumbing and Heating Contractors 
should write for interesting literature 
describing the complete Jenkins line. 
It will be mailed on request. 

JENKINS BROS., LIMITED 

103 St. Remi St., Montreal 

TORONTO VANCOUVER 
European Branch: 6 Great Queen St., Kingswav, London, 
W.C. 2, England 




The Classified Column. 

2 Cents a word or figure 
Minimum $1.00. 



ADDRESSING MACHINE FOR SALE — WE HAVE A COM- 
% PLETE Belknap Addressing Equipment for sale. This equip- 
ment is still in use in our Subscription Department and is in 
excellent working order. We have placed an attractive price on 
this outfit, and would advise manufacturers or merchants hav- 
ing a mailing list to let us" tell you how it will save you money. 
We will give a guarantee as to the proper working condition of 
this equipment. The MacLean Publishing Co., Ltd., 143 Uni- 
versity Avenue, Toronto. Ontario. 



•"TAYLOR SAFES FOR SALE— RARE OPPORTUNITY TO 
secure a safe at small cost. They are in splendid condition. 
Inside dimensions and prices are as follows : IB" deep, 2 ft. 6" 
wide, 3 ft. 11%" high, fitted with built-in- compartment. Price 
$250.00. 18" deep, 2 ft. 8" wide, 4 ft. 5" high, fitted with 
steel compartment. Price $200.00. Apply Box No. 701, Sanitary 
Engineer, Toronto. 

C ALESMAN — WITH COMPLETE KNOWLEDGE OF PLUMB- 
ing. Heating and Sheet Metal goods, also road experiences 
and good connections with the trade, in the Maritime Provinces, 
wishes to connect witfh good firm. For particulars, write Box 
931, Sanitary Engineer. Toronto. 



CASH 
IN 
ON 
THIS 
COLUMN 




Want to sell your Business? 
Want a partner with Capital ? 
Want some good used equipment? 

Sanitary Engineer's 

CLASSIFIED COLUMN 
WILL HELP SOLVE 
YOUR PROBLEM— 

SEND ALONG THAT AD TODAY 



January 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 47 



Index To Advertisers 

Allison, K. B 10 

Amherst Foundry Co., Ltd 41 

Andree Basin Wrench Co 48 

Anthes Foundry Co 2-3 

Bastian-Morley 45 

Canada Metal Co Inside Front Cover 

Canadian Tube & Steel Products 48 

Canadian Veneering Co., Inc 37 

Canadian Potteries, Ltd 1 

Crane, Limited 38 

Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., W. H 12 

Dart Union Co., Ltd Inside Back Cover 

Empire Brass Mfg. Co., Outside Front Cover 

Dunham, C. A., Co Inside Back Cover 

Farrel, J. E. 42 

Fittings, Ltd 43 

Forwell Foundry, Ltd 48 

Gendron Mfg. Co., Ltd 45 

Gait Brass Co Outside Back Cover 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp. . .-. ..... 4 

Hercules Chemical Co 37 

Henderson Business Service, Ltd 8 

Healy-Ruff Co 45 

Jenkins Bros . 46 

Jardine & Co., A. B 12 

International Correspondence Schools. 37 

Katie Foundry Co 48 

Kerr Eng. Co., Ltd 41 

Lord & Burnham Co 37 

Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., H 35 

Pipe Tool & Repair Co 48 

Ruud Mfg. Co 5 

'St. Louis Technical Institute 45 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co 6-7 

Steel Trough & Machine Co 48 

Toronto Hardware Mfg. Co., Ltd 43 

Trimont Manufacturing Co 43 

Want Ad. Page 46 

Warden King, Ltd. 10 

Wallaceburg Brass & Iron Mfg. Co., 
Ltd 9 

Williams & Co., J. H 42 

Wolverine, Limited . . . .- 47 



Safety First 



Use Wolverine Thawing Steamer 

For Thawing Frozen Pipes 




Made from Heavy Copper. Equipped with 
Safety Valve, Hose and Couplings. 




Use Wolverine Tap Plugs 



Note 
Sharp 
Cutting 
Edge 




Note 
Sharp 
Cutting 
Edge 



It pavs to have Wolverine articles on hand 
for instant use. 

ORDER NOW 



48 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



.January 1, 1923 




USE 



TESTED Soil Pipe 

IT COSTS NO MORE AND YOU KNOW THE JOB IS RIGHT 

Manufactured by 

FORWELL FOUNDRY, LTD. 

KITCHENER, ONT 




Get A Good 
On It! 



There you are again using the 
ordinary wrench — trying to fix 
that basin under a great handi- 
cap — and you bang your 
knuckles. Well, if you are 
working under such conditions 
it's your own fault for here is 
a wrench that will fill your 
every requirement. SAVE TIME 
AND MONEY BY USING 

THE ANDREE 
BASIN WRENCH 



The handiest ever invented. For 
applying and removing basin 
nuts quickly and easily. Grips 
automatically — no adjustment 
necessary. Also for turning 
small pipe. Operates either 
right or left. Guaranteed as 
claimed. Strong and durable, 8 
inches long, weight only 14 oz. 
For removing ball cocks from 
tanks, flush valve tubes and 
hush tubes from ball cocks, etc. 
without removing fittings. 
Ask your jobber or write us 
direct. 



Andree Basin Wrench Co. 

1113 Lake St., Oak Park, 111., U.S.A. 



Plumbers and Steamfitters — 

There is only one kind of satisfactory tool 
and that is one that is in perfect working 
order. Inefficient tools are a direct liability 
to you. 

Gather up your broken tools to-day, send them 
to us and we will quickly put them in shape 
for you. 

CANADIAN SERVICE STATION 
FOR BEAVER TOOLS 

The Pipe Tool and Repair Co. 

Adelaide St. W. Toronto, Ont. 

Repairmen to the Canadian Plumber and Steamfitter. 



PATENTED 



Better 
Selling 
Value 
Than Ever 



We have equipped our Steel BatJhs with Pressed Steel Removable 
Legs and 3 inch Roll Rim around the top, for which we have 
secured a Canadian Patent. This Roll Rim adds greatly to the 

selling value of 




TWEED 



ENAMELLED 
STEEL 



BATHS 



They now look like the expensive cast enamel baths but are the 
same price as before. Our new patent Roll Rim Enamelled Steel 
Baths are now ready for shipment — Order samples. 

The Steel Trough & Machine Co. Ltd. 

Tweed — Ontario — Canada. 
Toronto Office: 220 King St. W. Montreal Office: St. Nicholas Bldg. 




Easier to attach 
More permanen t 
Cost less 



Tapped Closet Bend 




WROUGHT PIPE 

Suitable for the approaching period of 
building activity, road construction, etc. 
This is a line of great importance in 
■ ^making successful, profitable contracts, 
<^£/^ Our C. T. Brand of Wrought Pipe has 
been 

THOROUGHLY INSPECTED 

by practical, experienced men. It is tested to 600 
lbs. hydraulic pressure, and branded with our trade- 
mark. We carry this line of reliable pipe in size? 
%-in. to 44n. Black or Galvanized. We also manu- 
facture nipples and couplings, black and galvanized, 
in all sizes. 

Ask your Jobber for C. T. Brand Wrought Pipe 

Canadian Tube and Steel Products Co., Ltd. 

Operating Canadian Tube and Iron Co., Limited 
Works at Lachine Canal, Montreal 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 




Dart Unions 

Locked beyond possibility of leakage. 



The use of Dart Unions is positive insur- 
ance against leaks. 

Heat, cold, expansion, contraction or vi- 
bration are encountered and overcome. 



The joint being Bronze to Bronze and the Malleable Iron 
Pipe Ends and Nuts being of extra weight ensures that 
the Dart will "stay put" till taken apart with a wrench. 

Your Jobber Sells Them 

Manufactured by 

DART UNION COMPANY, LIMITED 

TORONTO, CANADA 




DUNHAM VACUUM HEATING 



One of the outstanding advantages of 
the vacuum system of steam heating is the 
wide range of control of pressure to meet 
changes in weather conditions, made pos- 
sible by the use of the Dunham Traps. 

The Dunham Traps function — to pass air 
and water, and prevent passage of steam — 
whether under vacuum or pressure. They 
do this automatically, without change or ad- 
justment. 

Like all Dunham heating specialties, these 
traps embody only the finest materials and 
workmanship, insuring permanent and de- 
pendable service. 

Complete data on request. 



C. A. DUNHAM COMPANY, Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

Manufacturers of a popular 
line of heating specialties 

Halifax, Vancouver, Winnipeg, Ottawa, Montreal, Calgary 

London: 18 St. Thomas Street, S.E. 1. 




Dunham 
Return Trap 

Built with liberal 
piping connections, 
and with no obstruc- 
tion to the free vent- 
ing of air from ra- 
diators. In three 
sizes, c a p a c i ti e s, 
3,500 to 10.000 square 
feet of direct radia- 
tion. 



Dunham 
Specialties 

Packless Radiator Valves 
Radiator Traps 
Drip Traps 
Blast Traps 
High Pressure Bucket Traps 
Air Line Valves 
-Vacuum Pump Governors 
Reducing Pressure Valves 
Balanced Lever Valves 
Oil Separators 
Suction Strainers 
Return Traps 
Return Pumps (electric) 
Damper Regulators 




Dunham Radiator Trap — 

Functions efficiently a n >1 
noiselessly. 




Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 




The Realization of 
An Ideal a 



It has been our ambition ever since 
we have engaged in business to pro- 
duce a beautifully designed tank that 
would hold its transparent whiteness 
without stain, indefinitely, and that 
could be sold at a low price. 

To-day we have come to a realiza- 
tion of that ambition — and the 
New Design Vitro, because of 
its sheer beauty of design 
and its granite-like endur- 
ance has led in sales 
every tank in Canada. 



Ask Your 
Jobber 





Gait Brass Company, Limited 

Gait - Ontario 





Plumber and Steam fitter of Canada 



Vol. XVII. 


PUBLICATION OFFICE, TORONTO, JANUARY 15, 1923 


No. 2 






CUARA nteeq 

EMCQ 

CLOSET 1 TANKS 



An 

Attractive 
Combination 



THE new "Emco" Oak Tank 
has met with a flattering re- 
ception since its recent introduc- 
tion to the trade. The demand 
has far exceeded our expecta- 
tions. 

The special composition tank 
illustrated is rust-proof and its 
glossy finish will last for years. 
When used with the heavy type 
wash down bowl the effect is 
pleasing to the eye. Interior fit- 
tings are of best red metal. This 
attractive combination operates 
smoothly and quietly. 

Ask your jobber or write 
direct to us. 



Empire Brass Mfg. Co. Ltd 

London and Toronto, Canada 



Sanitary Enginee r , Plumber and Steamfitter 




j f i " ! t?H 



PUSSYFOOT 



99 



Leads the way in 



Closet Tanks 



The New Patent Ballcock 

with which it is fitted is pronounced by all Sanitary Engineers to 
be the greatest improvement ever made in Tank Fittings. 

The Silent, Rapid and Simple Operation is commented on every- 
where. 



It is shipped to you, each part securely 
packed in case as here shown, and all 
anxiety caused by possibility of damage 
is eliminated. 

Furthermore, on the LID of every Tank, 
you will find our Guarantee Label which 
gives you full protection. 




t r 



OUR GUARANTEE 

This Pussyfoot Tank is guaranteed to the ex- 
tent that no matter how many years it has been 
in use. if a fault of material or workmanship 
shows, we will replace with a new tank. 
The defective tank must be sent to us for inspec- 
tion. 

THE CANADA METAL CO., LIMITED 



' STYLE D. 

PUSSYFOOT 
CLOSET TANK 
SILENT EFFICIENT B»« 



Specify "Pussyfoot" to your Jobber and insist on getting it 



THE CANADA METAL COMPANY 



Montreal 



LIMITED 

Hamilton TORONTO 



innlpeg Vancouver 



January 15, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



i 



Include Refinement in your 
Service by Selling the 





OUR NO. 20 "Quietus" Syphon Jet closet 
as its name implies is of the so-called 
"silent" type. It operates so quietly 
that its action when flushed cannot be heard 
outside of its immediate environment; yet it 
possesses the same unhesitating strong action 
for which all Canadian Vitreous closets are 
noted. 



IT IS modelled on simple dignified lines; it 
is vitreous through and through and its 
lustrous shimmering white-glazed surface 
coupled with its special attribute of real 
quietness of operation commends it to the 
discriminating buyer who would include the 
utmost of refinement in his choice of toilet- 
room equipment. 



CANADIAN POTTERIES 



LIMITED 

SAINT JOHNS 

QUEBEC 



Sales handled exclusively through recognized jobbers in plumbing supplies. 



2 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter January 1 5, 1 92.1 




Did YoJ 



The Heart of 
the System 

The Anthes Syphon is 
the heart of the dispos- 
al system. Unfailingly, 
year after year it per- 
forms its important 
function. It can't get 
out of order because 
there are no parts to 
GET out of order. 



i 




tnuary 15, 192-". Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitiik 



ver Hear of 

naerobic Bacteria 

It is a rather appalling name to give those friendly little 
fellows who break up solids in the first chamber of a 
septic tank — but that is exactly what scientists call them. 
The name means: — "bacteria which live on organic 
matter and thrive without air or light." 

They not only break up vegetable and animal matter, 
but consume also deadly germs and paper, and but for 
them, the septic tank as we know it would not be 
possible. 

By the way — right now is the time to line up your rural 
prospects for spring installations of sanitary systems. 
Very soon spring will be here; in the interval, you can 
do a lot of real constructive selling and be ready to get 
to work at the first sign of warm weather. 

Be sure to specify Anthes Soil Pipe. This splendid, 
sturdy, long-lived pipe, so superior to ordinary piping. 

Anthes Foundry 

Limited 

Toronto Winnipeg 

Manufacturers of Cast Iron Soil Pipe and Fittings 



4 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter January 15, 



I'j2:; 




C RANE 



DRAINAGE FITTINGS 



ARE MADE WITH A SHOULDER AND ARE THE 
SAME INSIDE DIAMETER AS WROUGHT PIPE. 

THE PIPE SCREWS IN UP TO THE SHOULDER 
MAKING A CONTINUOUS PASSAGE, LEAVING NO 
POCKETS IN WHICH SOLID MATTER CAN LODGE. 

We recommend the use of our drainage 
fittings for Vacuum Cleaning installa- 
tions. Fittings that are ordinarily 
tapped pitched for drainage work can 
be furnished without pitch to order. 

All drainage fittings are recessed to 
allow easy entrance of the pipe. 

Manufacturers of Valves, Fittings and Piping 
Equipment and Distributors of Pipe, 
Plumbing and Heating Supplies. 



CRANE 



LIMITED 



Branches and Warehouses: 



HEAD OFFICE &. SHOW ROOMS 
386 BEAVER HALL SQUARE 

MONTREAL 

Works 

1280 ST. PATRICK ST. 
MONTREAL 



CRANE- BENNETT 



HALIFAX, OTTAWA, TORONTO, 
WINNIPEG, REGINA, CALGARY, 
VANCOUVER. 



Limited 
Head Office and Warehouse: 
LONDON, ENGLAND. 



Sales Offices: 



QUEBEC, SHERBROOKE, 
HAMILTON, VICTORIA. 



ST. JOHNS. 



Sales Offices: 
MANCHESTER, BIRMINGHAM. 
LEEDS, GLASGOW. 



43 



January 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND StEAMFITTER 



5 




ne Program for 1923 



We start the New Year with a heartfelt thankfulness for past favors 
and with a determination to bring to a reality those things of which 
we have been able to visualize in the past, 

we have been able onlv to visualize in the past. 
Price Service. 

Good Will Advertising Suggestions. 

Distribution to the trade of booklets, etc., for manufacturers. 
The making and publishing of suggested window displays. 

These activities will be explained in detail, in later issues of SANITARY 
ENGINEER. 

WRITE TO-DAY 

K. B. ALLISON 
4 Irwin Avenue - Toronto, Ont. 




One Boiler 

Sells Another 



The increasing demand for "DAISY" boilers 

/ @s year after wear offers proof of their popular- 
ity. We have found that one boiler sells an- 
other. 



A satisfied customer tells his friend or neighbor of its advant- 
ages, and more sales result. We have benefited through this 
ever increasing prestige. Have you? 

If not take hold of the opportunity for bigger business. We 
stand behind you on every sale and installation. 

Send us your specifications. 

WARDEN KING LIMITED 

MONTREAL 

Branch Office : 136 Simcoe St., Toronto. 




January 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



cmm bbjssom mm 



The true Japanese is as cleanly as he is polite; 
and he — and his family — revel in the delights 
of a hot bath. 

Particularly in the rural districts he is in his 
element bathing in the many hot springs of his 
land, but when these are not available the fam- 
ily bath tub, a type here illustrated, is used. 

Note the built-in stove. This illustration is drawn 
from a photograph of recent date. 




The bath proper is not taken in the cub. On the slatted floor he stands and 
soaps and scrubs thoroughly, rinses clean and then — and only then — enters 
the tub and blissfully soaks himself in water warmer than the average 
person of this country could stand. 



In their proper order his sons, his wife, his daughters and his servants 
from highest to lowest, enter, scrub and take turns in soaking up heat in 
the same bath tub; no one is exempt. 

Today in Canada thousands of homes are little better, if as well, equipped 
than those of the rural Japanese in the matter of bathrooms. Thousands 
more have obsolete bath equipment that should be replaced. 



Standard (Sanitary ,1T)&. Co 



i t e <* 



General Office and Factory : Royce and Lansdowne Aves., Toronto, Ont. 



Toronto Store : 
55-59 Richmond Street East 
Calgary: 
325 Eighth Avenue West 



Winnipeg Showrooms: 
76 Lombard Street 

Hamilton Store: 
26-28 Jackson Street West 

"Made in Canada 



Montreal: 
New Birks Bldg. 

Vancouver: 
860 Cambie Street 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



January 15, 1923 



A Big Purchase 

from every angle 




OU aren't really buying 
wrenches, you are after 
service. 

The mechanically correct jaw de- 
sign and extra length handle give 
a leverage that will turn the tight- 
est nuts, rods and pipes with less 
muscular energy. 

The ease with which it handles the 
tight-corner, close-overhead and 
up-to-the-wall jobs puts it far in 
the lead when it comes to all-around 
utility. 

And don't forget the service life. 
There are but three drop-forged, 
heat-treated steel parts in the make 
up of the LITTLE GIANT. They 
are practically indestructible. The 
double sets of teeth on the smaller 
sizes and the quadruple sets on the- 
larger ones assure a life of from 
two to four times that of any other 
wrench you can buy. 

Consider these points in favor of 
the LITTLE GIANT. If you wish, 
ask us to tell you what users say 
of its performance. 

Your supply house has it or can get 
it for you. 



Pipe Wrench 




ONLY THREE PARTS 
Practically Indestructible. 

(Note teeth on both sides of 
jaw.) 




TAP AND DIE 
COR PQg ATI Q N 

OF CANADA. LIMITED | GALT, ONTARIO 



London Office: Greenfield Tap & Die Corp.. 139 Queen Victoria St.. London. E.C.4. 

<C^^T D> Screw P1 ates, Taps, Dies, Reamers, Gauges, 
Pipe Tools, Twist Drills, Milling Cutters. 



January 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



SANITARY ENGINEER 



PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER OF CANADA 



Vol. XVII PUBLICATION OFFICE: TORONTO, JANUARY 15, 1923 No. 2 



CONTENTS 

How Plumbers Handle Receipt Tax 11 

Favor Proposal to Amend Sales Tax 12 

Fifteen New Customers in a Week 13 

If I Were a Journeyman , 13' 

"Having Wot Bill Calls Seasonal Windy Displaize" 14-15 

Cost to Plumbers of Labor Turnover 16-17 

Advertising Suggestions 17 

Rural Sewage Disposal Systems 18-19 

The Question Box — Warm Air Heating in Rural School 20 

Force Manufacturer to Sell to Consumer 21 

Editorial Comment 22 

Tinsmith Patterns for Hip Angles 23 

News Notes From Coast to Coast 24-25 

The Melting Pot 25 

Finished Houses and Plumbing 26 

Market Conditions and Tendencies 27-34 



The MacLean Publishing Company, Ltd. 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN, President. H. T. HUNTER, Vice-President. 

H. V. TYRRELL, General Manager. 



Publishers of Sanitary Engineer, Hardware and Metal, The Financial Post, MaoLean's Magazine, 
Canadian Grocer, Dry Goods Review, Men's Wear Review, Canadian Printer and Publisher, 
Bookseller and Stationer, Canadian Machinery and Manufacturing News, Power House, Canadian 
Foundryman, Canadian Shipping and Marine Engineering News, Canadian Automotive Trade 

Journal, Druggists' Weekly 
Cable Address: Macpubco, Toronto: Atabek London. En*. 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter of Canada 

Published on the First and Fifteenth of Each Month 

Office of Publication: 143-153 University Avenue, Toronto, Canada 
GEO. D. DAVIS, Manager. 
NORTON W. KINGSLAND, Advertising Manager 

H. L. SOUTHALL. Managing Editor. N. A. KEARNS, ContriDuting Editor. 

B. C. CULLEY. Associate Editor. O. W. KOTHE, Contributing Editor. 

W. C. DOVER, Associate Editor. EDWIN NEWSOME, Technical Editor. 



CHIEF OFFICES- 
CANADA— Montreal. Southam Bldg.. 128 Bleury St., Phone Plsteau 946. Toronto, 143-153 University Ave., Tele- 
phone Adel. 5740 ; Winnipeg, 810 Confederation Life Bldg., Telephone A. 3773. 

GREAT BRITAIN— London, The MacLean Company of Great Britain, Limited, 88 Fleet Street, E.C., E. J. Dodd, 
Director, Telephone Central 12960. Cable Address : Atabek, London, England. 

UNITED STATES — New York, L. H. Meyer, 1606 St. James Bldg., 1133 Broadway, Telephone Watkins 5869; Boston, 
C. L. Morton, Room 734, Old South Buildings, Telephone Main 1024 ; Chicago, 405-6 Transportation Bldg., 608 
So. Dearborn St., Wabash 9430. 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE — Canada, $2.00 a year; Great Britain, South Africa, and West Indies, 8s. 6d. a year; 
United States. $2.50 a year: other countries, $3.00 a year. Single copies, 10 cents. Invariably in advance. 



1(1 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and SteakVitter 



January lb, 1WJ 





One Man 
Does the Work of Two 



Why This Threading 
Tool is Better 



"Toledo" Geared Adjustable 
Threading Tool, No. 2'/z ; capacity, 
2'/ 2 to 6 in., inclusive; weight, 120 
lbs. 

In operation the cutters open out to cut the tapered thread. 
The dies cut only with the mouth of the cutter. Lead screw 
insures perfect pitch and form of thread. The machines are 
light and compact, have a minimum of working parts, strong 
and durable. All threads Ys" to 12" are threaded at one cut 
and by one man. 

Try Jardine or Toledo First Made in Canada Leading Supply Houses will quote You 



Winnipeg and West: 
STANLEY BROCK, LTD., 

Winnipeg, Man., Calgary, AJta. 
Vancouver, British Columbia. 



A. B. Jardine & Co., 

Limited 

HESPELER, ONT. 



Brockvil'e and East : 
J. R. DEVEREAUjT & CO.. 

New Birk.s Bldg.. Montreal, Qi» . 



Ontario, West of Brockville: W. H. CUNNINGHAM & HILL. 2&9 Richmond St West. Toronto. Ontario. 

Mail this coupon for a Catalogue. 



Name 



Address 



anitarv Engineer 



Improved Plunger 




Single Clapper 




Leather Plunger 



In addition to the "Boat Valves and Plungers" shown 
we carry complete stocks of high-grade "Valve" and 
"Cup" Leathers for cistern pumps. 

We also stock "Ubel" Semi Rotary Wing Pumps and a 
full line of plumbing and heating specialties. 




Carr's English Bindfast 
Plumbers' Black Smudge 

(Dry Powder in pound packages) 




Ready to mix with cold water. 
Will stand any degree of heat. 
Never wastes nor decays. 



W. H. Cunningham & Hill Ltd. 

Plumbing and Heating Specialties 
269 West Richmond St Toronto, Canada 



Established 
1907 

Circulates 
Throughout 
Canada 



VOL. XVII. 



Mm 

Plumber and Steam fitter of Canada 




TORONTO, JANUARY 15, 192c 



Published 
First 
and 
Fifteenth 
of Month 



No. 2 



How Plumbers Handle the Receipt Tax 

Some Questions Raised by Plumbers Concerning New Tax Im- 
position Are Answered by Taxation Official — Cash Register 
Slips and Counter Checks Not Affected if They Do Not Bear 

Words Implying a Receipt 



gOME enquiries have come to Sanitary Engineer from 
plumbers in various parts of the country concerning the 
working of the Receipt Tax, in effect since January 1, and 
some enquiries have elicited information of assistance, from 
tax officials and from other plumbers. 

A study of the regulations would make it appear that there 
is really little justification for any difficulty, because this tax 
has little effect upon the average plumber insofar as cash sales 
are concerned and it occasions little annoyance in connection 
with the accounting. 

One plumber stated to Sanitary Engineer that only a small 
proportion of the cash sales are for amounts over $10 and that 
seldom then is a receipt insisted upon by the customer. Where 
it is asked for, a cash register slip is given as sufficient evi- 
dence of the sale. Care is being taken that the cash register 
slip is not so worded as to constitute a receipt. In connection 
with accounts, the customer requires a receipted statement, 
and the plumber is of opinion that it is good business methods 
to give such a statement irrespective of the petty annoyance 
of placing a two cent stamp on the statement. It makes 
necessary the carrying of a supply of stamps, but this is al- 
ready necessary due to the cheque and draft tax. 

Another stated that little difficulty was being experienced, 
and that the law eliminating the ordinary cash register slip or 
counter check providing it was not in the form of a i*eceipt, 
made it much less onerous. This was according to the English 
law where the Receipt Tax was said to work with little fric- 
tion. He stated that he was just in the act of forwarding a 
protest concerning stamping of cash register slips and counter 
checks, when word came to him that these were being exempt- 
ed from stamp tax. He stated that a good many voucher 
checks were used in payment of accounts and these apparently 
did not require any additional stamping. 

In discussing the new Receipt Tax with an out of town 
plumber it was pointed out that the tax had not had any 
effect on charge accounts as yet, but the firm had arrived at 
two decisions with regard to counter sales and c.o.d. pur- 
chases. In respect to sales over the counter, steps are now 
being taken to revise the wording on the sales receipt. The 
former words to the effect that, a sum of one dollar will be 
paid to any person not receiving a receipt for their purchase, 
is being changed to "The sum of one dollar will be given to 
any person not receiving a printed slip such as this showing 
the amount of their purchase." 

In this way, he pointed out that the words "paid" and "re- 
ceipt" were eliminated. The former plate in the cash register 
has been removed and a new one is being made. Referring to 



the sales slips, it was stated that these were just being- 
initialed by the salesmen, and the word "paid" was no longer 
being placed thereon. With respect to c.o.d. purchases, he 
stated that he anticipated no difficulty in this direction, as the 
parcel was merely handed over by the delivery man upon pay- 
ment of the sum called for, and the possession of the parcel 
and sales slip by the customer was usually accepted as prima 
facie evidence that the goods had been paid for. 

A wholesale firm where a retail department is maintained, 
referred to the receipt tax as bearing upon their sales over 
the counter in the following manner: 

"We have the regular sales slip, which is made out by the 
salesman showing the goods purchased and the amount of 
same. Formerly this was initialed by the salesman and the 
word 'paid' stamped thereon, as well as the date. We have 
now adopted the plan of merely initialing all sales slips, 
and omitting the word 'paid.' This affects all slips whether 
for amounts over ten dollars, or not. Should a customer ask 
specially to have the word 'paid' stamped or written on the 
sales slip, as formerly, then we point out that under the re- 
ceipt tax regulation this will entail affixing a two-cent stamp 
— if the amount is over ten dollars." 

Another plumber pointed out that there appears to be some 
misunderstanding as to whether the customer or the plumber 
had to pay the tax. This firm also had adopted the method 
of merely initialing sales slips, the word "receipt," or "paid," 
having been eliminated. However, when a customer desired 
a "paid" slip and the amount purchased was over ten dollars 
and therefore taxable according to the meaning of the act, 
they have requested the payment of the tax on the pejrt of 
the customer. In this case it was pointed out by Sanitary 
Engineer that this was not in accordance with the regulations, 
as the party issuing the receipt was expected to pay the tax. 

It would appear, from a consensus of those plumbers inter- 
viewed by Sanitary Engineer, that the general practice adopt- 
ed has been to merely sign the sales slips, and to eliminate the 
word "paid," which was formerly placed thereon. In respect 
to cash register receipts, in most cases arrangements are be- 
ing made to strike off the word "paid" or "receipt" and sub- 
stitute the words "amount purchased," together with the date. 

Some rulings have been received on certain points put be- 
fore the Department of Customs by Sanitary Engineer. These 
are as follows: 

1. "Where a customer makes purchases and counter sales 
slips are prepared separately for each purchase and each slip 
marked "paid" individually, the total payment being made at 
(Continued on page 34"> 



12 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



January 15, 1923 



Favor Proposal to Amend Sales Tax 

Manufacturers Who Have Studied the Difficulties of Present 
Sales Tax and the Application of Proposed Amendment, Strongly 
Favor the Change— Manufacturer With Fixed Resale Prices and 
Discounts Points Out Some Difficulties 



EDITOR'S NOTE: — As taxation will again be taken up very shortly by 
Parliament in connection with the Budget for the next year, it is interesting 
to note that there is considerable support among manufacturers and whole- 
salers for the proposed amendment to the Sales Tax as outlined in former 
issues of Sanitary Engineer. This proposed amendment provided that 
sales from manufacturers to wholesalers, holding wholesale tax licenses for re- 
sale, be exempt from Sales tax. Secondly that wholesalers holding tax li- 
censes collect the full 4'/ 2 per cent, tax from retailers or consumers. Thirdly 
that manufacturers continue to collect 4'/ 2 per cent, sales tax from retailers 
and consumers. Fourthly that the collection of 4'/ 2 per cent, tax by whole- 
salers and manufacturers be compulsory with no option of absorbing a part 
or all of it. The stand taken by a number of manufacturers is outlined in 
the following: 



FS. LAYTHE, assistant-treasurer 
# Buttertfield & Co., Rock Island, 
Que., refers to the proposed 
amendment as follows: — "We are of the 
opinion, based on our own experience 
and study, also following closely the ar- 
guments which have been presented re- 
garding the present Sales Tax, that the 
amendment proposed in your letter 
should be adopted. We are inclined to 
believe that the acceptance of this 
amendment by the Department and the 
change made in the Act will simplify 
the collection of the tax and prove more 
workable all around." 

E. G. Bennett, assistant treasurer 
Crane Ltd., Montreal, is of the opinion 
that the proposed amendment is very 
much to be recommended. This firm are 
manufacturers and also jobbers selling 
to both wholesalers and retailers and 
consumers- This firm in company with 
others has had difficulty meeting the 
present requirements of the Act as re- 
gards the segregating and charging of 
the two different rates of tax as be- 
tween goods of its own manufacture and 
those that the firm sells wholesale, the 
situation being the more complicated on 
goods sold through various branches 
throughout the country. Mr. Bennett 
was of the opinion that the amendment 
would not only relieve firms such as his 
of much difficulty, but would give a more 
equitable measure of taxation to busi- 
ness in general. It was thought to be 
highly desirable to distract the public 
mind with taxation as little as possible. 

"We do recommend the suggested 
amendment," said Mr. Bennett, "and sin- 
cerely hope it will go through. Apart 
from this we favor a small tax on all 
sales as being the least felt and most 
economical to all concerned, but this ap- 
parently does not meet with general ap- 
proval. We would like to emphasise the 
fourth clause in the suggested amend- 
ment, as we feel this to be vital to the 
equitable application of the tax." 

D. R. Fowler, sales manager, Canada 



Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, 
Out., states: "We strongly favor the pro- 
posed amendment for the reasons you 
have outlined. The effect of the amend- 
ment no doubt will be to have the tax 
passed on as the government intended 
and there will certainly be a better feel- 
ing among manufacturers, wholesalers 
and retailers as a result." 

A. P. Beaupre, president. Canadian 
Veneering Co., Acton Vale, Que., favors 
the amendment in the belief that it will 
greatly help manufacturers who are ex- 
porting. "In our case we export about 
90% of our products all over the world," 
said Mr. Beaupre. "When exporting to 
the U. S- we have to pay a duty of 
45% and as the declaration of fair mar- 
ket value for goods sold in Canada for 
home consumption includes the 2%% 
tax we pay duty on the said 2^4%, 
thereby increasing cost of exportation, 
whereas under the amended regulations 
there would be a saving for exporters." 

G. B. Greene, gen. manager, General 
Supply Co. of Canada, Ottawa, is strong- 
ly in favor of the proposed amendment. 
"We believe this to be the only possible 
means of entirely eliminating the injus- 
tice now being done the Canadian whole- 
saler, and trust your efforts to have the 
Act amended in this manner will be fully 
successful. Otherwise we are convinced 
that the wholesalers of Canada will be 
forced out of business by an unbearable 
tax contrary to the fundamental prin- 
ciple of the Sales Tax Act." 

Geo. W. Reed & Co. Ltd., Montreal, 
spoken for by R. W. Mcintosh, secre- 
tary-treasurer, heartily approves of the 
proposed amendment. 

F. B. Combier, general manager, The 
Wm. Rogers Mfg. Co. Ltd., Niagara 
Falls, Ont., favors the proposed amend- 
ment and outlines his views on the sub- 
ject as follows: — 

1. "We find the present tax very con- 
fusing as to administration. It leads to 
duplication of tax which results in un- 
warranted hardships on some consumers 



and purchasers. 2. We favor the pro- 
posed amendment because we believe it is 
a generally accepted fundamental that 
it is . cheaper to collect, clearer to ad- 
minister and altogether preferable that 
any tax be collected at one source only 
or on one type of transaction only, in- 
stead of the same tax being sub-classi- 
fied and collected from various sources 
to presumably the same total on the one 
article of merchandise. Naturally and 
rightly the consumer pays for all costs 
including taxes on merchandise he con- 
sumes. It is therefore advisable that 
taxes be collected as close to the ulti- 
mate consumer's purchase as possible 
because the further back in the chan- 
nels of distribution a tax is placed, the 
more overhead, interest on investment 
and profits on the transaction will accrue 
on the tax money." 

F. Moore, vice-president and general 
manager, Benjamin, Moore & Co., Tor- 
onto, states, "We have given a good deal 
of thought to the present method of col- 
lecting tax and the proposed amend- 
ment. You have pointed out the real 
difficulties of the situation under the Act 
as it is at present. We think the 
amendment is the best way out of the 
present difficulty and the government 
will lose nothing financially by the 
change." 

A. J. Oliver, secretary. R. McDougall 
Co. Ltd., Gait, Ont., states: "It looks to 
as as if this proposed amendment would 
simplify matters very much and in our 
opinion this should be laid before the 
government in as strong a manner as 
possible. The only other thing which 
could be much better than this would be 
a general Turnover Tax." 

Some interesting points concerning 
the application of the tax where there 
is a suggested re-sale price on the art- 
icle are brought out by A. T. Channel, 
president Channel Ltd., Toronto, in the 
following: 

"In studying your suggested amend- 
ments and the manner in which you pre- 
sent your argument, we do not feel that 
it is applicable to a product sold on the 
basis that our products are sold; that is, 
with a set price to the consumer, a set 
discount to the retailer and an addition- 
al set discount to the wholesale trade. 
We do not view these set discounts too 
large and extravagant, nor do we hear 
opinions expressed to that effect. On 
the contrary we have heard them ex- 
pressed as fair and • reasonable and the 
pioper discounts for articles of this na- 
(Continued on page 34) 



January 15, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



13 



Fifteen New Customers in a Week 

Maritime Plumber Seeking Ways to Stimulate Trade, Sent Out 
Two Hundred Letters — Received Two Jobbing Orders in Two 
Days and in Week Had Fifteen New Customers — How Plumbers 
Can Sell Filtration Systems 



I 



6 THERE a place for the small 
fry in the plumbing sphere?" was 
a query put to L. M. Brown, of St. 
John, N. B., manufacturers' agent in 
plumbing supplies, who has just return- 
ed from 'a swing through the maritime 
provinces. 

"Yes," said Mr. Brown, "there is cer- 
tainly a place for the small plumber. 
For instance, he has a place in jobbing 
and in simall contracts. The chief trou- 
ble with the small plumber is that he 
does not get out after the business. He 
waits until it comes to him. And he 
waits and waits. 

"In my latest trip through the mari- 
time provinces I met a number of mas- 
ter plumbers, some of them big and some 
of them medium and others just little 
fellows in this game. Some of the little 
fellows were complaining about busi- 
ness. I asked one of them what he was 
doing to stimulate trade. He said he 
wasn't domg anything in that line at all. 
There he was with an abundance of com- 
petition and things in a natural depres- 
sion and he was just sitting still and 
hoping for the best. 

"I told him to get busy — show some 
life, and he would get results. I told him 
to send some personal letters around to 
builders and to owners of houses solicit- 
ing trade in both jobbing and contract- 
ing. He sent out two hundred in a few 
days. He did not even have letterheads 
and had to get a thousand printed. Also 
the same number of envelopes. He hired 
a girl to typewrite the letters. 

"Two days after he sent out the first 
letter, this plumber received two job- 
bing orders from people he had never 
done business with. And in a week he 
had fifteen new customers on his list. 
He had made enough to offset the cost of 
the letters in a week, and indications are 
he is in for some good jobbing business 
henceforth if he keeps sending out the 
personal letters. If he drops by the way- 
side again no doubt he will lose what he 
won," said Mr. Brown. 

An ingenious plan for acquiring busi- 
ness in the selling of filtration systems 
in the maritime provinces was discover- 
ed by Sanitaary Engineer. 

Circular letters were being mailed in 
follow-up order to firms manufacturing 
soft beverages, associations and colleges 
owning swimming pools, large hotels, 
and cities and towns with water systems. 
The first letter deals briefly on the ex- 
cellent points of a filtration system, 
making but minor reference to the par- 
ticular systems. In the second letter, 
the cood qualities of this particular sys- 



tem are impressed on the prospective 
buyer. The third letter is a personal 
letter written by the type-writer and not 
the mimeograph. This letter makes an 
attractive offer to the prospective buy- 
er, and mentions the fact that installa- 
tion of the system and operation will be 
cheaper in the maritime provinces than 
in other parts owing to the excellence of 
the maritime gravel. This gravel is ab- 
solutely necessary for the system, and 
the gravel found in the maritime prov- 
inces has been found to be superior 
to the gravel found elsewhere as far as 



the installation and operation of these 
filtration systems is concerned. In ad- 
dition to pointing out that the use of the 
gravel will cause cheaper installation 
and operations, as well as efficient op- 
eration, it states that owing to impure 
water in many parts of the maritime 
provinces owing to defective water sys- 
tems, of cities and towns, nitration sys- 
tems are a boon to health. 

Letters have also been addressed to 
health boards in the various cities and 
towns where there are swimming pools 
('Continued on page 19) 



"If I Were a Journeyman Plumber" 

(Suggested by K. B. A.) 

I would work whole-heartedly for the boss and be un- 
flinchingly loyal to him or else, if I must holler and grouch, 
I'd holler my fool head off, but I'd quit my job first. 

* * * 

I would be on time, or ahead of it, and ready to start the 
day at starting time. 

* * * 

I would keep my kit supplied with the little things I would 
likely need during the day. 

* * * 

I would see that my appearance was tidy and that my 
movements were active, especially whilst I was in contact 
with the public. 

* % ^ 

I would realize, that whilst the boss employed and paid 
me, yet that I, as he, was a servant of the public, and I would 
serve the public on that basis. 

* * * 

I would not be a clock watcher, because sometimes an extra 
hard problem might take extra time that would not warrant 
being charged. 

& * * 

I would read and study trade subjects so as to familiarize 
myself with the various trade practices. 

I would realize that whilst the pay per hour was the same 
for the thinking journeyman as the indifferent one, yet the 
prospects of steady employment would be greater for the 
former as would the chances of advancement be better. 

* * * 

I would be ambitious enough to qualify as a foreman and 
later on to become the proprietor of a business, realizing that 
my training would the better fit me to become a business man 
and an employer when the opportunity came my way. 

* * * : 

And I would keep in practice on the golden rule about 
doing unto others by putting myself in the boss's place and 
the customer's place as well as taking just my side of things. 



14 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter January in. 1923 




"Having What Bill Calls 
Seazonal Windy Displaze 

(With apoloqics to Rinq W.^Lardner) 
r BY 

Major L.L. Anthes. 

Managing Director- Anthes Foundry Ltd. 



Tarraboome, Jan. 15, 1923. 



Dear Al. :— 



THE Festuv Seezon has came and went. I do 
enjy Xmas. Theirs somethin about it that 
sturs the deps of a mans sole. You get so 
soft-harted that you want to give away everythin 
you got and don nead — You know me Al. It 
makes you feel poeticle two. Leastwize it gets me 
that way. Hears a little thing that Ive thunk out 
miself. Ime goin to spring it on Vilet for little 
doz she suspkt, that theirs a genyus in our middst. 
Lissen in Al, its good. 

In Tarraboom at Xmas time 

And snow drops fill the air, 
I love to sing and dance and play, 

And raize Old Ned fer fair. 

The Xmas. treez are all lit up, 

Even as you and me, 
And weer all hapy, even the pup, 

As far as eye can sea. 

The big fat turkies disappear 

The gravy gurgles down, 
And when I no that you are neer, 

Ime the hapiest guy in town. 

Oh happy time when bells do ring, 

And skates are on the ice, 
And you and I together sing 

O gee but aint it nice. 

And so I go from yere to yere, 

Till Crismus comes agen, 
And wish you all the festuv cheer, 

To which I say Amen. 



The buty of it is that theirs no alushion to shop. 
Wen I rite poitry Ime aible to keep miself abuv 
wurldly things. Thats the trew spirut of poitry. 

Well as I sed abuv, Xmas has came and went. 
We are having what Bill calls seezonal windy 
displaize. 

We had a slay party out to the bush and Bill 
cut down a big Nevergreen tree under my direc- 
tns. It was a bute! We brawt it in and put it 
in the middel of the shop windy. Then we went 
to the drigoods stoar & bawt a no. of roles of 
cotting batting. 

We spred it all over the flore of the windy just 
like sure enuff snow. Vilet bawt a big starr and 
some little Sandy Claws witch she hung on the top 
of the tree and on the end of the branchus. Then 
their was a lot of this here sillver festune stuff 
witch we skalloped all over the tree like Spanich 
moss. Bleeve you me Al it was the regler cats 
whiskrs. 

After the nitial trimmins we put up a lot of 
small nickle & annamal tilet fxtrs. hung like 
presence and if we dident have the klassiest Xmas 
tree in town you got annuther guess comin. 

The peeples crowded round that windy like it 
was a free S. S. entertanement. 

Wile we dident maik a fortun outta wat we solde 
offn the tree, still tho favorable comnts. what was 
passt maid you feal that it wernt loves laibor 
lost as Bobby Burns or sum other poett sez. 

Wen Bill 1st sprang this seezonal windy dressirr 
stuf I werent none 2 kean. 

"Wot you goin to dress the windy like when the 
fishin seazon comes in?" I asts him. Plumbin and 
fishin is a long way apart. You mite put a bathtub 
fulla water in the windy and have a lottuv empty 
hooch btls. floteing round in it to remind the fishin 
craft that fishin aint wot it usta bee. As fur the 
huntin seazon the only thing I can think on conec- 
tered with plumbin is you eld. hev a shower bath 



-January 15, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer. Plumber and Steamfitter 



15 



all elozad in with a curtain and a dummy on the 
outside with a gun peekin in, with a sine which sez 
"Its a bare." 

"Aw you dont get me atall" sez Bill, registerin 
discust. I dont meen to pull off no bum jokes like 
your talkin ov but to dress the windy appropryate 
to the seezon. 

"Oh I sea," I sez, "Snowballs in the winter, 
goluf balls in the Spring, moth balls in the summer 
and puffballs in the Fall." 

"Yessn a high 
ball fer leep yr.", 
snortered Bill. 
"Jest lend me yr. 
eer for a minnit 
and ile enliten yr. 
dence ignerance." 

"You kin hev 
my noze 2 if you 
like" I shot back 
at him with vimm. 

"My cars got a 
tale-lite," retortur- 
ed Bill with the 
heir of a witt. Bill 
can get reel snappy 
at timse. 

"What I meen 
by seezonal dis- 
plaize," sez Bill, 
"is makin youre 
show-windy attrac- 
tov at sikilogicul 
times." 

"Come again," I 
sez, "Wots this 
Siki stuff — the big 
smoke from Bene- 
gal what licked 
Karpenteer, o r 
Cupids side-kick 
wot sez to the well 
'How well I look'?" 

"Neethur," snor- 
tered Bill with distain. "Wot Ime tryin to tell you 
is, theirs a time and a plaice fer everythin — thats 
wot'Sikilogical meens." 

"Oh I get youse now," I sez. "The time & the 
plaice & the gurl," & I looks over twords Vilet 
for approvial. But I didnt get none. She was 
lookin at me in a board sort of way, witch maid 
me feal oncomfortabel. 

"You kin leeve the gurl out uv it," snips Bill, 
so I sets back to lissen. 

"Its nachural that befoar winter comes," per- 
seeds Bill, "peepuls begins to think how theys goin 
to keep theirselves warm, so thens the time to dis- 
plai youre heetin goods. When theirs no new jobs 




"When I got back from the shootin trip I seen a bunch of hicks standin 
in front of the store. My 1st thawt was fire! and my heart beet fast 
lest Vilet was saif and sound." 



in site, fix up youre windy to maik the peepuls 
with Noze Ark fxtrs. think theys gettin behind the 
times and neads an overhall & sofoarth & etc." 

"I sees," I retorz, but as the huntin seezon was 
jest a few dais off & I was booked up fer a shootin 
party, my mind was on the shootin & not on windy 
dressin. So to maik a short story long I sez "Go 
to it — put it over!" 

Bill looked hurt at my lack of enthusiasm, but I 
knew heed go threw with it if heed maid up his 

mind 2. 

Bill went out 
back to the shop 
wile I pertended I 
seen some 1 acrost 
the road ide fergot 
to tell somethin an 
so lit out. I new 
Vilet was layin fer 
me an discided dis- 
gression was the 
better part of 
valler. 

Wen 1 got bak 
from the shootin 
trip I seen a bunch 
of hicks standin in 
front of the store. 
My 1st thawt was 
fire! & my hart 
beet fast lest Vilet 
was saif and sound. 
But wen I gits 
near the windy I 
was flabby-gasted. 
Their was Joe 
Hicks our slickest 
jurneyman puttin 
the finish on 1 of 
the ancientest 
bunch of bathroom 
fixtrs. you ever set 
ize on. We got a 
long front to our 
shop & the biggest windy in town. Some 1 hed 
put up a wooden pertition dividin the windy in 2, 
and 1 side had nothin in it wile the other as afore- 
sed was bean fixed up by Joe Hicks. I coulda 
sworne that the fixtrs. had come outa 1 of them 
Egiptian Faro graves you reed so much about in 
the paipers. I shure thot some 1 had gone dippy, 
an wen I bust inter the dore I sez "Hooenells gone 
bug around hear?" 

"It must be yerself," came a laidys clear cut icy 
voice, "judgin by yr. languidge & yr. manners." 

Of coarse it was Vilet. An the frosty look she 
give me ! Oh gee ! 

(Continued on page 26) 



L6 



Cost to Plumbers of Labor Turnover 

What Makes Up Labor Turnover Costs — What Wages Are Paid 
for— Breaking In New Men Is An Expense — Spoiled Materials, 
Repairs, Etc., Run Up the Cost of Labor Turnover 

Written for Sanitary Engineer by G. \\. Hafner 



ACCORDING to reports made to 
the Industrial Bureau of the 
Merchants Association by 42 
concerns representing 15 different indus- 
tries and employing a total average force 
of 42,375 workers, the average yearly 
rate of labor shift or "turnover" in 
1921, for skilled and semi-skilled workers 
in one city was 125 per cent., and foi 
unskilled workers 265 per cent. 

Out of a total of 7,362 full year 
workers, in 5 mercantile establishments 
investigated by the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics for the years 1917-1918 837 
were discharged, 3,972 were laid off and 
10,432 left voluntarily — a total of 15,- 
241 or a labor turnover of 207 per cent. 
Of this 207 per cent. 141.7 per cent, 
consisted of voluntary leaving. 

What Wages are Paid for 
There are a multitude of reasons why 
men leave one place of employment to 
go to. another, some of which are le- 
gitimate, some imaginary and some 
foolish. The most prominent reasons, 
especially during rush of business, are 
wages and hours. 

Workmen have nothing to sell except 
their services. Custom has welded us 
to the thought that wages are compen- 
sation for time spent; but this is a 
peculiarly mischievous idea. When we 
come to analyze the subject, we find 
that most wages are paid for work done. 
There are few, if any, jobs in which 
wages are paid for bodily presence only. 
The real unit is the unit of production; 
of things accomplished; of tasks 
finished. And these, it will be found, 
are not convertible into units of time, 
even though we pretend to do it. 

The daily unit is necessary, of course, 
because men recuperate by sleep once 
a day. If it were possible to do other- 
wise, we would have men who would 
want to work 24 hours and then rest 
48. It is also cut into weekly units be- 
cause of the sensible and scriptural in- 
junction which affects the majority of 
workers. 

What Makes up Labor Turnover Costs 
Now the heart of this problem of 
labor turnover is its cost to the busi- 
ness man, and many proprietors and 
managers are extremely anxious to 
know what such costs consist of and in 
what ways they may i - educe such losses. 

The costs of labor turnover to the 
merchant or manufacturer are of many 
k'nds. These may be summarized as 
follows: 

1. Breaking in new men. 

2. Spoiled materials. 



3. Repairs. 

4. Accidents. 

In attempting to get some clear con- 
ception of this subject, it is highly im- 
portant that due consideration be given 
to each of these four kinds of labor 
turnover costs. 

Breaking in New Men 

Every time a new worker is taken on 
there is an expense of hiring. Time 
must be given by someone to the task 
of interviewing the applicant, deciding 
upon his rate of pay, securing his 
name and address for pay roll purposes, 
writing his name on the payroll, in- 
troducing him to the working force. 

But the expense does not stop there. 
To a greater or less extent the new 
workman must be trained. The fore- 
man and the workers already on the 
job must get him started, and show him 
how the work is to be done. They must 
continue to teach or train him for a 
more or less long period of time, depend- 
ing on the nature of the work he is 
set to do, until he has attained to the 
normal or average. This consumes time, 
and time in this sense is actual money. 
The time lost by foremen and the old 
employees in giving the new man in- 
structions, as well as the reduced out- 
put of the new worker, is a large item 
of expense. 

Spoiled Materials 

Everyone knows that the human ani- 
mal must be given time to adjust him- 
self to his surroundings. A new place 
to work, strange faces and unfamiliar 
environments all have a tendency to 
create a "sensitiveness" on the part of 
the worker, which in the majority of 
cases tends to prevent the man from ap- 
pearing at his best, and thus detracts 
from his ability to do good work. He 
is more or less awkward and distracted 
until the newness and strangeness wear 
off. 

This means that in the handling of 
the various kinds of merchandise or ma- 
terials carried by the individual busi- 
ness man, there will be for some time a 
greater degree of spoilage than usual. 
Any merchant or manufacturer can 
apply this for himself. If he will watch 
the next new man he sets to work in 
his place of business, he will have his 
eyes opened to the loss involved in 
spoiled goods. 

Trucks, wagons and equipment of all 
kinds stand idle, while waiting for new 
hands to replace those who have left. 
In like manner, all this equipment is 
more than ordinarily idle while the 



new workers ar - e becoming familiar with 
their tasks. 

But more serious than this is the 
fact that, during the time these green 
hands are learning, there is wear and 
tear on equipment. This means extra 
depreciation and the necessity for larger 
repairs and renewals. 

Also, there is a larger use of gas, oil 
and the like in operating trucks; greater 
use of power, lubrication, etc., in the 
handling of machinery and equipment, 
due to the fact that this equipment must 
be run longer in order to produce a 
normal output. 

Accidents 

As has been said, it takes time for 
new employees to co-ordinate or adjust 
themselves to new work and surround- 
ings. On this account they are more 
likely to get hurt. The frequency of ac- 
cidents is always greater among new 
men than among old workers. 

This means, to say the least, that the 
business man is subjected to a great 
many inconveniences. It requires him 
to take a greater care in supervising 
accident prevention. It compels him to 
pay higher rates for accident insurance. 
The time lost in giving first aid to 
the injured amounts to considerable in 
the course of a year. Hence, in break- 
ing in new men, the manufacturer or 
merchant is put to a large expense in 
terms of increased accidents. 

Figuring the Cost 

Having determined upon the main 
items which make up the cost of labor 
turnover, how are such costs to be fig- 
ured in terms of dollars and cents ? 

The rule for calculating the cost of 
turnover is difficult to apply, yet it will 
serve as a practical guide for those who 
are interested in working out such 
costs. The rule is: First find out the 
total amount spent for breaking in all 
men on a given job, both those who 
stay only a little while, and those who 
remain until they become normally effi- 
cient, taking into account as far as pos- 
sible all the items of cost already enum- 
erated; second, deduct from this total the 
difference between the standard wage 
and the lower wage paid to workers 
during the learning period, since the 
lower wage paid partly makes up the 
cost of breaking them in; third, divide 
the amount thus obtained by the num- 
ber of workers involved, and the result 
will be the average cost of turnover for 
that particular job. 

If you wish to find the annual cost of 
turnover for that particular job, multi- 



January 15, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



17 



ply the average cost of turnover just 
found by the total number of persons 
hired for the job during the year. 

The booK on "Labor Turnover, Loyal- 
ty and Output" by Colvin, says that 
"the actual cost of hiring and firing a 
man may run from $20.00 to $2,000.00, 
depending on the kind of a man and the 
importance of the job." From this any 
business man may gain some sort of 
clear idea of the staggering drain on 
his own business caused by labor turn- 
over. 

What Men Work For 

But the time necessary to work out 
labor turnover costs of this kind may be 
worse than wasted, unless the business 
man is thereby led to realize that he 
should take some steps to discover meth- 
ods of holding men. Any plan to be 
sucessful must have an unpretentious 
democratic basis. Feudal systems that 
dispense largess and expect correspond- 
ing loyalty usually, get disappointment 
and a cynical view of human nature for 
their reward. 

Others who do things — usually kind 
things — for their employees, hav<= grat- 
itude and appreciation of the acts more 
in accordance with the manner in which 
the things are done than for the spirit 
which prompts them. 

The real problem is how to adapt our 
methods to human nature as it is, and 
always will be, yesterday, to-day and 
forever. All that we can be sure of is 
that there must be genuine sympathy 
and understanding on our part of the 
other fellow's point of view, if we are 
to create that spirit of loyalty in him 
that is the foundation stone of efficient 



Loyalty — that's the word to think 
about, both in your attitude toward the 
worker and in the worker's attitude to- 
ward you. No man really works for 
wages. What he puts in his time for is 
money. He must have money, because 
the world is organized that way. He 
cannot raise sheep for clothing on the 
roof of his flat. He must get money 
somewhere for the things which he can- 
not make for himself. Necessity com- 
pels men to get money, honestly or 
otherwise. 

But when we find a man really work- 
ing, it is because of a deep sense of 
loyalty. Why did men go to the war, 
volunteer or drafted, without a regret? 
Because there was something, intangibly 
spiritual, in their enthusiasm for and 
loyalty to the flag. 

It is the job of every business man 
to build up this same sort of loyalty in 
his own organization. 



PROGRESS ON NEW WATER WORKS 
SYSTEM 

Trenton, Ont.— Messrs. McNabb & 
Traverna have finishedl laying water 
mains from Queen street to Lorne Ave. 
on King street and from Dun das to the 
new water tank on the hill. Also from 
Division street to new pump house and 
from the new collecting gallery. 

The contract given to Weddell & 
Saunders for pump house is all but com- 
pleted and the collecting gallery along 
the foot of the mountain some four 
hundred feet is expected to be com- 
pleted in three weeks' time, providing 
weather permits. This gallery is cap- 
able of holding an immense surplus sup- 
ply of water and the contractors de- 



cided to finish the work rather than 
wait till spring. 

The big tank on the hill is also com- 
pleted. 

The pumps for the pump house have 
been ordered and will arrive about 
February first. 



WATERWORKS ASSN. TO HOLD 
MEETING 

A mid-winter meeting of the Cana- 
dian Branch of the American Water 
Works Association will be held in Feb- 
ruary 22nd and 23rd, at the Carls-Rite 
Hotel, Toronto. The meeting was ar- 
ranged by the executive committee 
which met in Toronto recently. Ar- 
rangements are also being made for a 
display of water works appliances and 
machinery in connection with the meet- 
ing. The official program for the meet- 
ing has not been leceived as yet. 



WATER WORKS COMPLETED 

Woodbridge, Ont. - — The town of 
Woodbridge has completed and has now 
in operation a modern up-to-date water- 
works system, surpassed by none other 
in the province of Ontario, according to 
local authorities and the firm of archi- 
tects in charge of the undertaking. 

Around August 1st work was begun 
on the system, and since that time two 
miles of water mains have been laid, a 
stand pipe with a capacity of 100,000 
gallons constructed and a well, with a 
capacity of one-third of a million gal- 
lons a day excavated and completed. 
The estimated cost of the undertaking 
was $37,000, and a remarkable feature 
in connection with a public work was 
that this amount has- not been exceeded. 



Suggestions for Current Advertising 

(Electros of illustrations can be procured from Sanitary Engineer) 



Greatest Need in Farm Homes 




THERE is not a convenience enjoyed by householders paying 
taxes for city water service that cannot be had with a 
compression tank and pump in a farm home — a bath with 
running water both hot and cold, running water in kitchen, 
running water to wash the automobile or extinguish the fire. 
This last consideration has saved the price of a water system 
many times over on many Canadian farms. 

Let us show you why city people live longer than those in 
the rural districts. 



(Your name here) 



Phone number. 



Address. 



Ban the Handyman! 

ONLY competent, well-trained mechanics who can make 
lasting repairs or correctly install plumbing or heating 
fixtures. The life of such equipment is materially short- 
ened by faulty installation. The investment should be 
protected. 

It will pay you to see us when you want economical, reliable 
repair service. We have the fully qualified mechanics and the 
equipment to handle them to do satisfactory work. A long list 
of satisfied customers, many of them in your district, will con- 
firm this statement. 



We can safely 
guarantee our re- 
pair work and in- 
stallation work. 
This added protec- 
tion costs you no 
more. 

(Name here) 
Phone number. 

Address. 




18 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter January 15, 1923 



Rural Sewage Disposal Systems 

Physical and Bacterial Action in Septic Tanks — How Sludge 
Accumulates and is Dissolved or Broken Down — Action of 
Bacteria in Cultivating Chamber — How to Assist Germ Life in 

System 

Written for Sanitary Engineer by EDWIN NEWSOME, Consulting Sanitary and 

Heating Engineer 

(Continued from last issue) 



THE chapter published in the Dec. 
15th issue of the Sanitary En- 
gineer dealt with the history of 
germ life and its application to sewage 
disposal systems and the why and 
wherefore as to why the effluent dis- 
charged into the disposal system of field 
tile pipe does not freeze. A little ex- 
planation from a physical as well as 
bacterial action is worthy of careful 
consideration. 

First of all let it be noted that sep- 
tic action must take place in a septic 
tank and that no harmful chemical com- 
pound such as carbolic, formaldehyde, 
formalin, permanganate of potass, lysol, 
cresol, creolin or any such antiseptic 
fluid are used to any great extent. 

If the state of health of the occu- 
pants of a house require that any anti- 
septic fluids must be used, the discharge 
should not be permitted to enter into 
a septic tank. 

To name any or all of the above as in- 
jurious to the bacteria in a septic tank, 
does not by any means infer that those 
compounds are injurious or harmful to 
humanity when used for specific pur- 
poses, but it does mean that fluids of 
that nature are injurious to the friendly 



bacteria so very necessary in a septic 
tank. 

In the septic process of purification, 
sewage from a plumbing system enters 
into the septic tanks, and, for a period, 
a fairly large quantity of solids will re- 
main in the form of sludge and un- 
broken up solids, human excreta, fats, 
paper, and so on, the fluid which enters 
the tank is to some extent charged with 
oxygen, which is dispelled by the pre- 
sence of aerobic bacteria. The latter 
soon disappear when the sewage has 
been freed from oxygen while at the 
same time the scum which by this time 
has formed on the top of the sewage. 

Then this aerobic bacteria, having 
done its work, leaves the sewage in a 
suitable condition for anaerobic action, 
which is the most effective in liquefy- 
ing solids, and in this way the first 
chamber or septic tank becomes the seat 
of two distinct actions. 

For example, the interior, and on 
the bottom of the tank, anaerobic bac- 
teria attacks the solid matter, botn 
sludge and floating solids, and while the 
anaerobic bacteria is thus working the 
aerobic bacteria, re-attacks the sludge, 



and in that process keep- the sludge 
down to a minimum. 

Let it be further explained. The 
sludge on the bottom is subjected to 
both biological and physical action. 
Gases produced by the liquefying bac- 
teria in the sludge, rising to the sur- 
face of the fluid by the aid of small 
globules of gas, which gas becomes lib- 
erated at the top of the fluid under 
the scum, these gases then penetrate 
the scum and are carried off up through 
the soil pipe stack. The sludge freed 
of the gas globules again settles to the 
bottom of the tank. 

The physical action is taking place 
night and day all the time, in the septic 
tank (first chamber) and if it were pos- 
sible to place a glass in the side of 
this tank, the physical action could be 
clearly seen, and it is only when the 
effluent ceases to be active that it rises 
and overflows into the dosing chamber. 
The solids, as before stated, do not 
overflow into the dosing chamber. 

It will therefore be seen by the above 
detailed explanation, that the effluent 
when it enters the dosing chamber, is 
entirely free of oxygen, but is in such 
a condition as to be ready for fresh air. 



S/ze And Dimensions o f Se ptic Tank Suitable For House Occupied 3 y 

Tu/e/ce (/Z ) Persons 

^ 



>o K Dosin g Chamber 



High tJa+er levet^-Q— 





^^JtoJS^ S/» inches Thick 



'Six Inches Thick 
TofaTWidth o f^Se pf/c Tank g lOrTolal L enqthWW 



January 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMF1TTER 



19 



Plan With 5/$e Of Sepl/c Tank 5v/fab/e For Mouse flcci/J?/ec/ 
3y Twelve (12) Persons . 




ftecieuiny Or'Culfwaf tng 
Cham ber. 



/Qossng Of Sy/bfocs7 
C hamper. 



/c 



this is procured as soon a it is dis- 
charged into the field tile area, and be- 
cause of the fact that such bacteria as 
are found in the upper surfaces of the 
ground, namely aerobic bacteria, makes 
it necessary to provide an intermittent 
application of effluent from the dosing 
chamber. 

There are few authorities on this sub- 
ject that would state just how much 
sludge will or will not accumulate in 
the septic tank compartment. For ex- 
ample, if a tank is constructed in the 
fall of the year, and the process neces- 
sary to break down the solids has not 
reached its most active stage, a greater 
depth of sludge will be formed in the 
bottom of the tank. This condition is 
not likely to be alarming, because as 
soon as the spring comes around, or 
provided that an extra quantity of 
hot water is used, with a relative quan- 
tity of solids, the sludge will gradually 
disappear. 

The writer has known where the 
sludge has collected in a septic tank 
to the depth of twelve inches during 
the first 6 or 8 months after tank has 
been put into operation, and 4 months 
later, the sludge has disappeared until 
only two inches remained. 

It is well to have the septic tank 
inspected at least once a year, during 
the warm part of the fall season, be- 
cause if, upon inspection a great 
amount of sludge is found, it should 
be removed, as it is not likely that the 
supply of sewage during the colder sea- 
sons, would be warm enough to entirely, 
or even partially, destroy the sludge as 
well as break up newly discharged 
solids. 

If, however, the septic tank was in- 
spected in the spring, and a fairly deep 
sludge contents were found, there need 
be no sludge removed, as the warmer 
weather would assist the breaking 



down process; very likely before the fall 
season all the sludge would be gone. 

The writer made inquiries from the 
owner of a septic tank installed by the 
former over 15 years ago, and though 
for several months foul odors were 
found to come from the breather, later 
on no such disagreeable condition pre- 
vailed. Another case was found not 
far from Toronto where a septic tank 
has been in use for over four years, 
and no odors are to be found, and with 
the exception of the first month or so, 
no odors have been noticed. 

If it were possible to procure a good 
quantity of scum from an already active 
septic tank, the scum then placed in a 
newly constructed tank the trouble with 
odors would be largely overcome. But 
the re-planted scum would have to be 
little disturbed, and placed into the cul- 
tivating chamber when same was nearly 
full, and at no lower a temperature than 
65 degrees, or not lower than the tem- 
perature of the fluid from which the 
scum had been taken. 

The average summer working tem- 
perature of sewage is about 60 to 65 
degrees Faht., whereas in winter the 
temperature will fall to 44 or 46 degrees 
Faht., which is quite normal and not 
likely to freeze. One of the greatest 
"help," towards keeping a field tile area 
in good condition is to dig it, plow it, 
harrow or otherwise break it up. This 
will re-aerate, or charge the earth with 
more aerobic germs or nitrates so that 
it will be clearly seen that a vegetable 
garden, truck or domestic, would be a 
most favorable area for a subsurface 
disposal field tile system of piping. 

The accompanying illustrations show 
plan and elevation of a septic tank 
suitable for taking care of sewage 
from a house occupied by 12 persons. 
The syphon will discharge 324 gallons 
of effluent per operation every 24 hours, 



it will be necessary to lay 648 linear 
feet of field tile pipe. The size of this 
tank is arrived at by making an allow- 
ance of twenty-seven gallons per per- 
son. 

Some authorities claim that an allow- 
ance of not less than 50 gallons per 
person per day should be made, but 
from inquiries made, the writer finds 
that in towns where houses are metered 
as low as 6 gallons per person is con- 
sumed daily. We will deal with this 
matter in our next issue and show 
where out of over 2000 families the 
greatest quantity used per family of 
five persons averaged only 18% gal- 
lons per person. Yet we have town and 
city water works authorities claiming 
that as high as 300 gallons per perso» 
per day is used. We will give some 
startling information regarding this toj 
later, because it has a great bearing 
upon sewage disposal systems. 

(Continued in next issue.) 

FIFTEEN NEW CUSTOMERS IN A 
WEEK 

(Continued from page 13) 

and to the departments of health of the 
provinces calling the attention of the 
members to the menace lying in un- 
filtered water in such pools. It is pointed 
out that contagious diseases of all sorts 
are to be contracted in the swimming 
pools where unfiltered water is used, 
and the names of some of the more mal- 
ignant diseases are specified. 

That filtration systems can be install- 
ed by any efficient plumber has been 
proven conclusively in the maritime 
provinces, where installations have been 
made by plumbers who t have not seen a 
swimming pool or filtration system until 
engaged to make the installation. An 
ability to clearly follow defined instruc- 
tions is the chief asset demanded. 



20 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



January 15, 1923 



THE QUESTION BOX 



Warm Air Heating in Rural School 



Knowing that for years you have 
been an authority on heating, and hav- 
ing read your articles in various trade 
journals, we desire some information 
regarding a heating system which we 
have installed in rural school near 
Orillia. 

The situation is as follows: We 
furnished a pipeless furnace and install- 
ed it as shown on the enclosed plan. 
The trustees now ask us to move it to 
the rear of the basement; the present 
location of the furnace is shown on plan. 
Could you suggest a better location and 
one that would enable the furnace to 
heat the building satisfactorily? Please 
tush ycur reply. 

The trustees desire us to place the 
furnace as shows in the rear; see plans 
I and 2. Plan one gives desired loca- 
tion of registers. Plan two the de- 
sired location of the furnace. Awaiting 
your early reply. 

T. P. and Co., Orillia. 

P. S. Kindly return sketches with 
your reply. 

In the first place, we sent our reply 
t>y return mail, but for the benefit of 



our readers, have decided to publish a 
more detailed answer to the above in- 
quiry. The writer also happened to be 
in Orillia at the time this matter was 
under discussion, and found that there 
were one or two other points to be con- 
sidered than actually appear in the cor- 
respondence. 

Here is the situation: — Certain rate- 
payers decide to erect a school. They 
elect a number of trustees, who in turn 
appoint a building committee. 

The committee prepare, or have pre- 
pared for them, the plan of a school. 
Size about 60 feet long by about 25 feet 
wide. The accompanying sketches show 
the two floor plans, basement and 
school room. The committee have erect- 
ed the school. No specifications were 
drawn up as to size of furnace, type, 
or method of heating, except that the 
school had to be heated by warm air. 

The building committee did not make 
out any specifications for the heating 
system, but did request that a large 
enough furnace be installed to heat the 
school without unduly forcing same. 

The heating contractor used his own 



personal judgment in the matter, based 
upon years of previous experience, 
coupled with the knowledge he had as 
to the purse strings of the ratepayers 
and, therefore, installed a pipeless fur- 
nace in the manner and location shown 
in plan number two. And we find that 
the furnace heats the building well and 
to the entire satisfaction of the build- 
ing committee as well as several others 
of the tiustees. But — it now transpires 
that the basement is required for pur- 
poses that require a clear space from 
rear to front and the contractor is asked 
to take back the present furnace, fur- 
nish a pipe furnace and install it at 
the rear in a separate compartment 
wheie the fuel is stored. 

We are asked for advice, not as to 
whether the contractor is or is not en- 
titled to some remuneration for the 
changing of the furnace, but rather as 
to whether or not the present kind of 
furnace is the best, and if it could be 
better located, as well as whether we 
think that a pipe furnace with registers 
placed as suggested would be best. 

In the first place, we do not think for 
one moment that a pipe furnace would 
heat the building at all if placed as 
suggested. 

It will be seen that two warm air 
legisters are shown in the floor near 
baseboard, 20 inches x 26 inches. Also 
a round face register ; n wall at the 
rear of the basement, 20 inches in a 
meter. Holes have to be cut at the 
base of the furnace to admit cold air, 
but no cold air pipes have to be connect- 
ed. Two cold air registers are to be 
placed as shown, and to these registers 
two cold air boxes are to be carried to 
within 20 inches of the basement floor. 

The suggested change is one of the 
most impractical plans we have ever 
seen, as well as vei*y insanitary. In 
the first place the proper location of a 
pipe furnace would be in the exact cen- 
tre of the basement, with registers 
near the two side walls, at equal dis- 
tances from the rear and front, with 
two cold air registers, one near the 
front entrance and one at the rear. The 
furnace then would heat the floors 
above as well as the whole of the base- 
ment. But to expect a furnace, placed 
at the rear in a separate compartment 
as shown, is asking too much of any 
kind of furnace. Then again, to allow 
cold air to be drawn from the firing 
room or even from the basement would 
set up unhealthy conditions. No sani- 
tary engineer would endorse such an 
idea. The dust and dirt from the floor 
of the school room, as well as the base- 
ment would be drawn with the furnace 
and forced up to the school room, and 
inhaled by the pupils. It is just such 
conditions that are responsible for 75 per 
cent, of our victims to tuberculosis. And, 
understanding this, we feel sure that no 
school board, ratepayers or committee 
of ratepayers would wish to have a 
heating system so installed. 

If the ratepayers wish to use the base- 
ment to a greater degree than is pos- 
( Continued on page 23) 



Warm Air _Hea-ring In Rural School 
Plan 1 Plan 2 . 



floor Register 



F loot- 
Reg nler 



School Room 

Elevation /Z'O" 



20*2i face 




20X2^ 

face 



\ 



Proposed Furnace Location And 
Chimney 




ZO Round Face In 

P//>e/ess furnace 
Locafed Mere 



. 3gsem enf 

Elevation g'o" 



Boxes To Within — 
ZO" Of Basement F/oor 



5kefch Subm 'i+te d By On ff/o Subscr/6er 




January 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND StEAMFITTER 



"Force Manufacturer to Sell to Consumer at 

Same Price as Wholesaler or Other Trader" 

Such is Effect of Decision of Federal Trade Commission of U.S. 
Which Certain Wholesalers Are Opposing — Would Play Into 
Hands of Co-operative Retail and Chain Store Organizations 



A SITUATION of much interest to the retail and whole- 
sale trades has developed in the United States, recently, 
in connection with an appeal by The Mennen Company 
against the Federal Trade Commission due to a decision of 
the latter body which is said to limit the freedom of sellers in 
formulating and carrying- their selling policies into execution. 

In this connection a brief has been filed in the United 
States Circuit Court of Appeals, at New York, in behalf of 
several of the most prominent national merchandising as- 
sociations and other bodies. These are wholesale firms and 
it was felt that as The Mennen Company were man- 
ufacturers, that these representations would present a more 
complete aspect of the questions involved. 

This brief contends that the commission has misconceived, 
in the order appealed from, the purpose and effect of Section 
2 of the Clayton Law making unlawful any discrimination in 
price between different purchasers of commodities, where the 
effect of such discrimination may be to substantially lessen 
competition or tend to create a monopoly in any line of com- 
merce. Cases where this decision did not conform with other 
decisions of the United States courts in similar matters were 
given. It is further pointed out that the arguments presented 
by counsel for the government are fallacious. Among others 
the following statement was made at the hearing: "If all 
manufacturers in the drug and sundry lines adopted the mar- 
keting system of the respondent, it would force the closing 
of the doors of every concern discriminated against in price. 
The evidence in this case shows that the marketing system 
of the respondent was adopted to: 

Forces Resale at Suggested Price 

"1. Force resale of its products at its suggested prices. 2. 
Penalize efficiency and economy. 3. Satisfy complaints and 
demands of individual members of the National Wholesale 
Drug Association, competitors of co-operative wholesale 
houses." 

The brief goes on to point out that there is nothing to show 
that The Mennen Company endeavored to force resale 
of its products at its suggested resale prices, and the other 
charges are said to be without foundation. 

The brief points out that if the order appealed from be af- 
firmed and the method of business be forbidden, the result will 
be to lessen competition to a vastly greater extent than if 
such order be reversed and such method be declared lawful. 
The argument is summarized to the effect that if the conten- 
tion urged by the Federal Trade Commission should be de- 
clared law, it would follow: 

"Firstly: That wholesalers would be seriously hampered, 
their business materially impaired and their "future existence 
imperilled, if not terminated. 

"Secondly: Retailers not within the class of chain stores, 
department stores, mail order houses or members of co-opera- 
tive corporations, buying clubs or syndicates (and the retailers 
who are not within such class are immeasurably the larger 
number of retailers in the country) would be unable to com- 
pete with the retailers in the classes named, their business 
would be impaired and their future existence imperilled, if 
not made impossible. 

Favor Individual Consumer 

"Thirdly: If the system contended for by the Federal 
Trade Commission be established and manufacturers forbidden 
to discriminate in price as between wholesalers and co-opera- 
tive corporations and the like, the same principle would forbid 



such discrimination as between the two classes named and the 
individual consumer when the latter buys the same quantity of 
a given commodity as the former. Such a situation is not 
only conceivable, but it is a matter of common occurrence that 
an individual consumer does buy certain commodities in the 
same quantity as a wholesaler, e.g., a box of soap, a stove, a 
range, an automobile. If the new system of business here 
contended for be declared to be the law of the land, a manu- 
facturer would be compelled, in the instances named, to make 
direct sale to the individual consumer at the same price as to 
the wholesaler. The obvious result of this would be the im- 
pairment of the business of the wholesaler and of the retailer 
and a serious derangement and disorganization of the business 
of the manufacturer. It is not too much to say that the result 
would be little short of chaos. Nor is the illustration chimeri- 
cal or fanciful. It but depicts the natural consequence to be 
expected from a paternalistic and meddlesome interference by 
government with the conduct of private business. Even if these 
results should not occur in the precise detail and to the precise 
extent indicated, such interference and control on the part of 
government would necessarily tend to check the initiative of 
the merchant and manufacturer, by imposing upon the free 
exercise of his judgment as to the most efficient method of 
conducting his business, the judgment of a governmental 
tribunal and of the courts. It cannot be doubted that such a 
procedure would impair efficiency, check and hamper individ- 
ual enterprise and energy, and to tend to deprive the trade and 
commerce of the country of the benefits which normally flow 
from business skill and acumen when not exercised by methods 
inherently wicked or constituting offenses mala in se — meth- 
ods not claimed to be present in the case at bar. 

"The value of the 'old line wholesaler' in the scheme of dis- 
tribution of manufacturers is an economic fact long estab- 
lished. They constitute, in substance, the salesmen of the 
manufacturer. They gather together under one roof the pro- 
ducts of many manufacturers and hold in readiness in their 
warehouses these countless products for prompt and ready 
distribution in small quantities to the retailer. By closer 
acquaintanceship derived from propinquity to their retail cus- 
tomers, they are better able to judge of the financial credit 
of the latter than the more distant manufacturer. If these 
wholesalers be driven aut of existence, the manufacturer in most 
lines of industry would be confronted with the need of making 
direct deliveries to countless customers, at great distances, 
in relatively small quantities, and without adequate oppor- 
tunity of determining the credit standing of such customers. 
It seems fair to say that such an undertaking would be im- 
possible. The wholesaler now fills this function to the satis- 
faction of the manufacturer and of by far the greater num- 
ber of retailers in the country. Shall this time-honored in- 
stitution be disrupted by the inauguration of the new and 
unheard-of system here urged by the Federal Trade Com- 
mission — and so urged upon the basis of a statute never de- 
signed to that end; and, in the debates which accompanied 
its passage through Congress, no word in support of such a 
system was ever uttered ? 

"The order appealed from seems to have been based upon 
a superficial reading of Section 2 of the Clayton Act, without 
regard to its history and to its declared purpose; without re- 
gard to the decisions of the courts adjudicating it and the 
other anti- trust laws; and without regard to the vastly great- 
er injury to trade and commerce which would follow from 
the procedure which that order would inagurate, than from the 
long-established procedure which that order seeks to prohibit." 



•22 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter January 15, 1923 



Plumber andWeamfitter of Canada 

ESTABLISHED 1907 

Member Audit Bureau of Circulations 
PUBLISHED TWICE MONTHLY BY 

The MacLean Publishing Company, Limited 

Montreal TORONTO, CANADA Winnipeg 

Vol. XVII. JANUARY 15, 1923 No. 2 



An Unfortunate Situation 

'JpHE alleged high cost of plumbers and plumbing, were sub- 
jects discussed at a recent open meeting- of the New York 
Association of Master Plumbers, the idea being to bring to 
the attention of the public the abuses said to be fostered by 
the workers. It was charged that fifty million dollars' worth 
of plumbing contracts for this year were tied up because of 
an artificially created famine in plumbers; that employers 
were forced to pay plumbers $10 and $15 a day and guarantee 
overtime despite the fact that the union scale calls only for 
$9 a day. It is stated that twenty representatives of the 
Plumbers' Union were among those attending the meeting but 
declined an invitation to comment on the charges made. 

It is unfortunate that those men engaged in the industry 
itself have no more concern for its welfare in the eyes of 
the public than to be a party to such a situation. Steps must 
be taken to renew confidence among the public in their regard 
for the plumbing industry both from the standpoint of their 
functions and their integrity. 

A Profitable Field 

pERHAPS it's just as well that carrying pocket microscopes 
isn't fashionable. If we were to examine the air in many 
of the public places we attend all unconscious of the danger, 
we would be horrified at the result. 

None of us would consent to being confined, for even a few 
brief moments, in a room which we knew to contain thous- 
and of germs each carrying a deadly disease. Common sense 
would prompt anyone to avoid such a room, for it would be 
almost impossible to avert being inoculated with some disease 
which might ultimately cause death. 

Yet, despite the good sense that causes humanity to fight 
shy of contact with contagious maladies, thousands of other- 
wise prudent persons flock daily to poorly ventilated public 
places without a thought of the many health perils which may 
be harbored there in the fetid, poisonous breath exhaled by 
hundreds of individuals, and intermingled in the dead, foul 
atmosphere. 

This scientific fact is borne out by the frequency of per- 
sons fainting wherever a crowd congregates indoors. Seldom 
does a large number of persons collect in one enclosed place 
without one or several individuals growing weak and sick. 
This is <fue to the lungs becoming impoverished from lack of 
oxygen because sufficient fresh, clean air is not available. 



It has been observed that such occurrences are most fre- 
quent in theatres, and an investigation of public gathering 
places revealed an almost total neglect of correct ventilation. 

In many states, statutes and city ordinances have been 
enacted to enforce the laws of fresh air, and compel owners of 
theatres, and other places where crowds gather, to install ven- 
tilating equipment of a character which will ensure abundant 
fresh air. 

The field of ventilation equipment offers the plumber splen- 
did opportunity for business. The need for such equipment 
is not as apparent as is the case with plumbing or heating 
appliances and for this reason more educational work is 
necessary. The foregoing may give some ideas for develop- 
ing this kind of trade. 

* * * * 

A Much Undersold Field 

r jpHERE are a great many opportunities for the merch- 
andising of plumbing equipment which are not being fully 
taken advantage of by sanitary and heating engineers. The 
case cited elsewhere in this issue of a small Maritime plumber 
who, acting on a suggestion to get some letterheads and en- 
velopes printed, and send out a number of letters to prospects, 
secured a number of new customers in short order. Such op- 
portunities exist in every municipality in Canada. The field 
for equipment in rural districts is one which offers wonderful 
opportunities, likewise the industrial field where business men 
are gradually being educated to the advantage of sanitary 
conditions for their employees. 

In the field of water heaters there is also a big opportunity 
where gas is available. There is said to be an advantage in 
heat saving in the use of a gas heater as compared with cer- 
tain other forms of water heating-. There are many towns of 
20,000 population where there are 800 to 900 automatic water 
heaters in use. In one larger city there are 18,000 small 
heaters and 3,000 automatic heaters in use, the latter chiefly 
in houses of a value of $10,000 and over. In the Pittsburgh 
district there are said to be in the neighborhood of ninety 
thousand automatic gas water heaters in use. ThWe is claimed 
to be a field for the sale of nine million automatic heaters in 
the United States. The number would be considerably less in 
Canada, but it is in greater ratio than the proportion of popu- 
lation because of climatic conditions! 

Moisture and other weather conditions affect heaters, and in 
certain sections their life of usefulness is much shorter than 
in others. This offers opportunity for renewal as well as new 
business. This is undoubtedly one of the most undersold 
fields in Canada and one which lends itself to development of 
profitable business for the plumber who gives service equal to 
those who are now taking the cream of such business. 

^ANADA'S improving financial condition is shown by 
reports just issued indicating an increase of $6,000,000 
in the revenue for 'the nine months of the fiscal year ending 
December 31. The biggest increase is shown in Inland 
Revenue, from Sales and Stamp Taxes. In the nine months 
these taxes brought $75,000,000 into the treasury, an increase 
of $20,000,000. Income tax revenue declined twenty million 
dollars, being a reflection of business profits, while Customs 
revenues increased ten million dollars in value. These figures 
indicate higher values and increased imports, an increase in 
volume of business done in the country, though profits were 
not up to usual levels during last year. This is a true rep- 
resentation of the business experience of that year and the 
thing to do this year is to increase the profit margin where 
possible and to stimulate turnover. 



January 15, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



23 



Patterns Show Use of Hip Angles 

Written for Sanitary Engineer by O. W. Kothe, Principal St. Louis 
Technical Institute, St. Louis, Missouri. 




ELtYATION 



0EV£LO«»/N<» 




PL AH 



THE finding of true angles through 
hip lines of various designs as 
covers, hoppers, pipes, etc., is very 
important, and is also a part of descrip- 
tive geometry, extended to a more prac- 
tical application. In figure 1, we take on 
the development of the angles in the 
hip of a pitch cover made to an octa- 
gon. The plan shows the half octagon, 
while the elevation shows the rise with 
X-Z as center height. Now one man- 
ner of developing true angles is shown 
in connection with this plan. 

The first step is to lay out 2 patterns 
directly from the outline of plan. So 
we pick the side line of cover X-Y, and 
we set them as a-b and d-e in pattern I 
and II. Then we draw the slant lines 
c-b, also c-e and f-e. This will give 
the separate patterns for each octago- 
nal segment. The next step is to set 
dividers to any radius, and using c as 
center, describe an arc as j-k. Then 
from these points square out lines to 
right angles to their base lines, or 90 
degrees, to intersect the extended plan 
lines in points g and h. Now use h or 
g as center, and k as j as radius, and 
describe an arc to the hip line of plan as 
in m. Then draw line h-m-g, which 
is the true angle for the hip. This 
hip would have to be bent to this shad- 
ed bevel. 

The same result is produced by a dif- 
ferent treatment as in figure 2, which 
M-N-0 is the angle of outline of plan, 
or the octagonal angle in this case. 



Patterns for Hip Angles. 

Then M-P equals the central miter line 
and also is the length of one of the mi- 
ter lines in plan. From P square out 
equal to the rise X-Z as P-Q; then Q- 
M-P will be the true diagonal section 
through hip. At any place at R draw 
a line square to miter line M-P until it 
intersects the outlines in point N and 0. 
After this, draw a line as U-T through R 
so that it is parallel with the hip line 
Q-M. Afer this, square a line at right 
angles from R to N-M as R-S. Now 
use R as a center and N and as a 
radius, describe arcs to the line P-U. 
Then the angle T-S-U will be the true 
bevel through the hips of our cover. 
This method may be a little harder to 
see through than the above method, but 
it permits a wider range of application. 

Then at figure 3 we show another 
treatment for hip lines of a pan, where 
it is the desire to have the true bevel 
of the angles in the hips, A-C-C'-A". 
Here this treatment is repeated as 
shown in figure 2, and hence needs no 
further comment. 



The next best suggestion, if not the 
very best, would have been to install a 
steam furnace with a number of steam 
radiators fitted on the walls of the base- 
ment, and a number of direct-indirect 
steam radiators in the school room. 
Then the steam furnace would take up 
very little space, and there would be no 
pipes to obstruct any useful space in 
the basement. 

The direct-indirect radiators, being of 
such a kind would not only heat the 
room, but would also admit fresh clean 
air from the outside. In conclusion, we 
are sure that taking every condition in- 
to consideration, the heating contrac- 
tors used good judgment in placing 
furnace where they did. 



WARM AIR HEATING IN RURAL 
SCHOOL 

(Continued from page 20) 
sible with the furnace in present posi- 
tion, there is only one location we would 
suggest and that is to move it a little 
to the rear about half way between 
chimney and the partition, and still use 
the same furnace. 



PREFER TO JOIN CITY OF ST. JOHN 

St. John, N. B. — It has been shown 
that the ratepayers of East St. John 
have a desire to secure extension of the 
St. John water and sewerage systems 
to East St. John rather than to install 
a special set of these systems in East 
St. John. Although the light voting- 
precludes a definite indication of what 
the voters really want, yet the pre- 
ference seems to be for the extension 
of the St. John systems and the ulti- 
mate annexation of the district to the 
city of St. John, instead of continuing 
as a separate municipality. 



24 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



January 15, 1923 



News Notes From Coast to Coast 



BUSINESS CHANGES 
. Moose Jaw, Sask. — Frost Bros., 
plumbers, have discontinued their branch 
at Regina, Sask. 



INCORPORATIONS 

Hickey & Aubut Ltd., head office Mon- 
treal, capital $50,000 to manufacture 
furnaces, stoves, ranges, piping, san- 
itary apparatus, ettc. 

Perfection Radiators Ltd., head office 
Montreal, capital $750,000 to manufac- 
ture and deal in radiators. 



PERSONAL 

St. John, N. B. — Two master plum- 
bers are acting as chairmen for wards 
in the Liberal city committee of St. 
John, there being indications of a com- 
ing election in New Brunswick politics. 
They are Joseph Doody and R. J. 
Harrington, both for many years iden- 
tified with politics as Liberal workers, 
in St. John. 

Dave Donaldson, formerly with 
Wolverine, Ltd., traveling from Fort 
William, Ont., west to the coast, has re- 
turned to the employ of the plumbing 
firm of Robert Paterson, Keele St., To- 
ronto. Mr. Donaldson was for seven 
years with this firm and the break be- 
tween his former employment and his 
return now has been of two years' dura- 
tion. 



PLUMBERS EXPECT BIG JOB 

St. John, N. B. — Following the visit 
of Sir Henry Thornton, the new gen- 
eral manager of the Canadian National 
Railways, plumbing and heating con- 
tractors of New Brunswick seem con- 
fident a new station will be built at St. 
John. The plumbing and heating con- 
tracts for this big building will be lus- 
cious plums. Reports are that the 
work will be started- in the spring. 



KITCHENER BD. OF HEALTH 
MAKES REPORT 

Kitchener, Ont.— The health of the 
city has been favorable in the past 
year according to the reports submitted 
by Sanitary Inspector W. H. Rau and 
Chairman Geo. Bucher at the last meet- 
ing of the year of the board of health. 

The report by the sanitary inspector 
on the work and conditions in the past 
year follows: 

For the month of December I report 
as follows: — Six cases of diphtheria and 
one of measles. As this is the last 
meeting of the year I will conclude my 
yearly report which is as follows: 

We had sixty-three cases of scarlet 
fever, ttrivty-one cases of diphtheria, 



Doings in the Plumbing and 
Heating Industry 



seventeen cases of small pox, twenty- 
one cases of measles, three cases of in- 
fantile paralysis, one typhoid fever, in 
all 136 cases. Last year's report was 
254 cases. 

The sewage from several industrial 
plants on Spring street caused con- 
siderable trouble but this will be taken 
care of by the city engineer. The gar- 
bage system has been exceedingly heavy 
this year, averaging twenty tons daily. 



CLOSE UP UNSANITARY HOUSES 
St. John, N. B- — The St. John Board 
of Health has closed up several houses 
in St. John as unfit for habitation and a 
card so stating has been placed on the 
outside of each. This action has fol- 
lowed negligence of the owners in in- 
stalling modern sanitary plumbing. 
There are said to be a number of houses 
now occupied by tenants^ in St. John 
that should be closed until the owners 
install sanitary plumbing. 



WILL HAVE DRAINAGE CONVEN- 
TION IN CITY 

Chatham, Ont. — Announcement has 
just been received that the annual con- 
vention of the Ontario Farm Drainage 
Association will be held in this city the 
last three days of this month. 

The sessions of the convention will be 
held in the Chamber of Commerce. An 




F. R. MAXWELL 

Sanitary Engineer of Toronto, former 
President of Canadian Society, D.S. & 
H.E., who Was re-elected Alderman in 
Ward 8, Toronto, for 1923 and elected 
Chairman of the Board of Works for 
the city. 



attractive program has been arranged 
and prominent speakers have been en- 
gaged for the various sessions. 



EMPIRE BRASS CO. HOLD ANNUAL 
SALES CONVENTION 

A four-day annual sales convention 
was held this month by the Empire 
Brass Manufacturing Co. Representa- 
tives were welcomed at the head office 
in London by C. S. Stevens, vice-presi- 
dent, who gave an outline of the im- 
provement made in the Empire plant 
during the past year in the way of mo- 
dern machinery and other factory equip- 
ment, designed to care for the increas- 
ing opportunities for trade in brass 
goods. The entire sales organization 
attended. A keynote of optimism was 
evident when prospects for business dur- 
ing the coming year were under discus- 
sion. The convention program was 
taken care of by W. H. Darling, sales 
manager, London, and O. L. Robb, man- 
ager of the Toronto branch. 



SAYS WATER NOT RESPONSIBLE 

St. John, N. B.— To the report that 
the St. John water has been responsible 
for some cases of typhoid in St. John 
and suburbs, T. M. Burns, secretary of 
the St. John Board of Health, has stated 
that Dr. H. L. Abramson, pathologist, 
for the provincial department of Health, 
has taken samples of the water and has 
pronounced the water good. 



TENANT GETS DAMAGES FOR 
LACK OF HEAT 

Montreal. — Tenants living in badly 
heated apartments will find some con- 
solation in the judgment rendered by 
Mr. Justice Mercier in Superior Court, 
in which he condemned a landlord to 
pay $250 damages to a tenant because 
a flat had not been kept at a "comfort- 
able living temperature" as stipulated 
in the lease. 

A condition in the lease was that the 
dwelling should be heated by the owner, 
and maintained at a proper heat at all 
times. In this the landlord failed con- 
spicuously, he stated, and the average 
temperature of the place during the 
cold months of January to April 1922 
was a bare 47 degrees above zero, 
Fahrenheit. The mercury fluctuated 
between 43 and 52 most of the time, 
with the consequence that the tenant 
caught a severe cold which required 
protracted and expensive treatment. 

In addition, the cold and dampness 
injured the furniture and silverware 
to such an extent that these articles 
were damaged in an irreparable man- 
ner. In all, the tenant claimed $760. 



January 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



NORWOOD, ONTARIO, TO VOTE ON 
WATER WORKS AND FIRE 
PROTECTION 

The fact that the Ontario Government 
is conducting short courses to farmers' 
sons and daughters as wen as rural 
residents should make it possible for 
.sanitary and heating engineers to put 
forth greater efforts towards increasing 
business in rural districts. 

One town, Norwood, is already vot- 
ing on a oy-law which will, if passed, 
tend to increase the use of sanitary con- 
veniences in that district. Mr. New- 
some, the technical editor of Sanitary 
Engineer, is doing much good work along 
this line, and even if this bylaw does 
not pass, 'there is already good ground 
broken by the lectures already given. 

Apart from the work done in this 
course Mr. Newsome is giving a lecture, 
open to the public at each town he 
calls, and Norwood citizens turned out 
to the number of nearly 200, a proof 
that people in Norwood want to know 
all about sanitary bathrooms and city 
conveniences. It is rumored too that a 
sanitary bylaw will go into effect re- 
garding the installation and designs of 
sewage disposal systems, septic tanks, 
etc. 

With the present interest in water 
works, and fire protection in Norwood, 
it would appear to be an opportune time 
for some one to establish a plumbing 
and heating business in that town, 
there being no local industry of that 
kind there. 



MONTREAL BUILDING SHOWED 
INCREASE IN 1922 

Montreal. — Building operations in 
Montreal for 1922, amounted to $21,132,- 
586, which is practically the same 
amount as recorded for 1921, amounting 
to $21,726,332. If the $5,000,000 build- 
ing permit issued to the Mount Royal 
Hotel at the close of 1921 is regarded as 
being in a class by itself on account of 
its extraordinary investment, it will be 
seen that the building record for the 
year just ended shows a substantial in- 
crease over the ordinary building activ- 
ities for the year 1921. The building 
record by months for the year was as 
follows, according to figures supplied) by 
the Building Inspection Department: 
January, $216,460; February $561,100; 
March $935,713; April $2,038,834; May 
$2,831,690; June $2,558,077; July $2,291,- 
190; August $2,080,270; September $2,- 
210,167; October $1,720,875; November 
$1 675 370, and December $2,011,940. 



WILL START COURSE AT COLLE- 
GIATE FOR STEAM ENGINEERS 

Regina, Sask. — A course for steam 
engineers will be started in connection 
with the evening classes at the Regina 
Collegiate Institute, it was announced 
by G. R. Dolan, principal. 

The course will be for firemen who 
have had experience with high pressure 



boilers and who desire to obtain second 
and third class certificates. Candidates 
entering the class will be prepared for 
the government examinations which 
will he held in March. 



USED SANITARY ENGINEER'S SUG- 
GESTED WINDOW DISPLAY 

When calling on the plumbing firm 
of Band & Cole Ltd., Ottawa, a repre- 
sentative of Sanitary Engineer heard 
favorable comment from Mr. Cole's son, 
on the articles which have been appear- 
ing from the pen of Major L. L. Anthes. 
At the same time this firm had a win- 
dow display showing a Christmas tree 
hung with bathroom fittings, taken from 
a suggestion appearing in a December 
issue of Sanitary Engineer. The firm 
find the paper useful for giving such 
ideas. 



WESTERN ONTARIO NEWS 

Alex. Milne, London, Ont., has been 
awarded plumbing contract for new 
$10,000 citadel being erected for the 
Salvation Army. 

E. R. Seabrook 119 King St., London, 
Ont., is preparing plans for two new 
dwellings to cost $8,000 and wants pri- 
ces on hot air heating, plumbing and 
electrical equipment. 

Dr. F. N. Sangster, Sarnia, Ont., has 
plans and will call for tenders shortly 
for new residence costing $15,000. Pri- 
ces wanted on hot water heating, 
plumbing and electrical work. 

Plans are to be prepared by Watt & 
Blackwell, Bank of Toronto, London, 
Ont., for a $100,000 addition to St. Jo- 
seph's Hospital. Prices will be wanted 
on steam heating, plumbing and elec- 
trical work. 

Ed. Bratt, Harrow, Ont., is preparing 
plans for new $4,000 dwelling and 
wants prices on heating and plumbing. 

Ratepayers of Campbellville, Ont., 
have voted on the question of installing 
an electric lighting system. 

Architect W. G. Murray, Dominion 
Savings Building, London, Ont., is pre- 
paring plans for a new residence to 
cost $15,000 for R. H. Dowler. Prices 
will be wanted on steam heating, plumb- 
ing and electrical work. 

John A. Nash, 182 Dundas St., London, 
Ont., is having plans prepared for an 
addition to his jewellery store to be used 
as an art gallery. The building will 
cost $20,000 and prices will be asked 
shortly for heating and electrical equip- 



PITTSBURG WATER HEATERS 

A new general catalog covering their 
line of copper coil water heaters has been 
issued by the Pittsburg Water Heater Co., 
of Pittsburg, Pa. This book is profusely 
illustrated with the various types and 
styles of heaters, showing methods of in- 
stallation, dimensions and details of con- 
struction, as well as general views. Much 
useful information is also given regarding 
the uses and adaptability of these particu- 
lar products. The principle of operation, 
together with the different sizes, are also 
contained in this illuminating catalog. 




DO YOU KNOW THAT— 

Many a man has made a false step by 

standing still. 
A wheelbarrow will stand on its two 

legs and never move a foot unless 

you lift it up and push it along. So 

would business. You've got to pick it 

up and push it along. 
You don't have to know anything about 

grammar to tell the truth. 
A hen is the only creature on earth that 

can sit still and produce a dividend. 
Talking comes by nature; silence by 

wisdom. 

When a man starts out to make a fool 

of himself he can be depended upon 

to surmount all obstacles. 
No currency is elastic enough to stretch 

from earning capacity to desire. 
He profits most who serves best. 
Good ideas are only seeds. They must 

be planted and tilled before they can 

produce. 

There are two kinds of men who never 
amount to anything — one kind can- 
not do as they are told, and the 
other cannot do anything else. 

The best time to loaf is after you're 
dead. 

So many things seem impossible — until 
they are attempted. 



"Madam," said the conductor, politely, 
to the colored lady, "you must remove 
that suitcase from the aisle." 

"Fo' de Lawd sake, conducto', dat aint 
no suitcase, dat's mah foot." 

Catchers Keepers 
"I wouldn't marry you," she slaid 
scornfully. "If you were the only man 
in the world." 

"No, you wouldn't," he answered. 
"You'd get trampled to death in the 
rush." 

The Lot of Them 

A teacher in a village school asked 
the other day: "How many kinds of 
flowers are there?" 

Three pupils held up their hands. She 
chose one to reply. 

"Well, Beatrice, how many kinds of 
flowers are there?" 

"Three, teacher." 

"Indeed? And what are they?" 

"Wild, tame, an' collie!" 

Table Etiquette 

The Teacher — And what do we do with 
the whale ? 

Bobby— Eat it. 

The Teacher (sarcastically) — Oh, do 
we! And what do we do with the bones? 

Bobby — Put 'em on the edge of the 
plate. 



26 



Sanitary Engineer. Plumber and Steamfitter January i 5, H*2:: 



Finish Houses and Plumbing Before Applying 

for a Permit 

Plumbing Inspector of York Township Gives 
Evidence in Inquiry — Plumbing Inspector's Fee 
Not Forthcoming for Long Period After House is 

Built 



S)ME points of interest to plumbers 
were brought out in connection with 
the inquiry held in York Township 
into certain alleged deficits in the Trea- 
sury. The hearing was before Judge 
Denton in Toronto. 

H. Hughes, plumbing inspector, for 
the past two and one-half years, was a 
witness. He said he had two assistants, 
Beeston and McGowan. He had no s'ys- 
temized inspection whereby he knew 
that everybody who was building a house 
had had plumbing plans inspected by 
the Township, the staff wasn't big 
enough. 

Often builders or owners finished 
their houses and the plumbing before 
they applied for a permit. 

"All the plumbing would be covered 
up then," observed R. S. Robertson, K.C. 

Witness: "If it was, and we found 
out we should prosecute, but we have 
to grant a permit." 

There were hundreds of houses in the 
Township with no plumbing fixtures be- 
cause there were no sewers. In this 
way the Township didn't receive the 
plumber's inspection fee until the 
plumbing was installed, sometimes years 
after the houses were built. He him- 
self, examined and passed on all plans 
of proposed plumbing. He used "dis- 
cretion" sometimes, if he thought the 
owner or builder did not purposely break 
the by-laws in their planning. 

He Has the Say 

Counsel: "Is there no appeal from 
your decision ?" 
"No." 

"So that if you want to beat a man 
out of the plumbing business you can?" 
There was no answer to this. 

Three houses had been completed last 
August, and had plumbing installed 
without the plans being first inspected 
by him. One of the houses was plas- 
tered, so that he couldn't inspect all 
the plumbing. The houses had been 
"O.K.d" by some unknown person. The 
plumber hadn't been penalized for not 
submitting plans. 

Counsel elicited the information that 
witness had granted a permit to a 
plumber whose plumbing was all wrong 
when he inspected. This was "because 
his plans were all right " witness said. 

Owner Complained 

A letter was read from an owner, 
George Brown, complaining that the 
plumbing had been "O.K.'d" by an un- 
known person before it had been com- 
pleted. 

"What did you do about that?" — A. 
— "We couldn't find the person." 



Judge — "It might have been someone 
trying to get into the cellar. Some men 
will do that kind of a thing to get in 
a man's cellar and get his liquor." 

Counsel: "Did you try and find out 
who was doing this O.K.-ing?" — "We 
made many inquiries, but couldn't get 
anything definite." He thought there 
was some animosity agair.st Inspector 
McGowan, who inspected plumbing, and 
somebody might be trying to "get him 
in Dutch." 

No Check on Other Depts. 

Counsel: "Did you keep a check on 
the Waterworks Department as to when 
they turned on water, so that you would 
' now that no owner would get away 
without having his plumbing inspected 
and paying his fee?" — "No." 

Judge: "Perhaps it didn't occur to 
you." — "No." 

Counsel: "Do you keep a check on 
what permits the building department 
are issuing?" — "There's no co-operation 
hetween our department, the Building 
and the Waterworks Department." 

Witness wished more co-operation, and 
said he would like to be relieved of the 
handling of the cash he received for 
permits issue. 



SPEND $50,000 ON NEW SEWER 
SYSTEM 

Nelson, B. C— To install the Fair- 
view sewer system will entail an outlay 
of $52,026.81, according to figures giv- 
en by W. M. Myers of Green Bros., 
Burden & Co., the city's engineers, in 
an estimate presented to the city coun- 
cil. This is the estimate for the entire 
project, covering all of Fairview but 
the hill section. The system will re- 
quire more than four miles of pipe. 

In the above figure is included $18,- 
535.50' for excavation, $15,383.39 for 
pipe. $8,575 for pipe laying. An item 
of $2,875 is included for engineering 
work and inspection. 

In the area covered by proposed sys- 
tem there are approximately 200 hou- 
ses to be served and approximately 800 
lots front on or will be accessible to 
the sewer. In addition to this number 
of lots there are approximately 300 ad- 
ditional lots which will be benefitted by 
the installation, as in no case will more 
than 600 lineal feet be required to give 
a connection. 

"The total length of nipe on this pro- 
posed system is approximately 22.00° 
feet. The plans call for the construc- 
tion of 50 manholes, 31 light holes and 
32 catch basins. Three outlets are pro- 



vided, the main one being at the foot 
of Kootenay street, with an outlet pipe 
800 feet in length. The second outlet, 
at the end of First street, provides for 
a small septic tank and an overflow to 
the lake. This outlet will carry the 
sewerage from block 21 only, and will 
not be added to as the general system is 
expanded. The third outlet is at the 
foot of Poplar street. 

"So far as possible the proposed sys- 
tem provides basement drainage for all 
houses, and to a large extent will col- 
lect through the various catch-basins 
the surface water which is now periodi- 
cally a menace to a part of Fairview." 



SEAZONAL WINDY DISPLAZE 

(Continued from page 15) 

"Wots the big idear," I sez, tryin to 
look digneifide. 

"It sertainly aint yourn," she bit off 
at me. "Theirs an old sayin," she con- 
tinyers kostically, "that childern an 
foolze shoodnt look at % finnished werk. 
An you aint no child!" 

I new I was goin to get the wurst of 
it so I begin to talk about myself an 
my trip to put myself at eeze — you 
know me Al. 

But I was curyious as to wot the 
stunt in the windy ment, thow I never 
ast no more questns. 

However wen Joe Hicks started to 
werk on the other side of the windy I 
begin to get wize. He fitted it up into 
1 one of the swellest little bathrooms 
you ever seen. He put immytation 
white tileing on the flore and wails 
and used a big sheat for the sealing. 
He put in alectrick lites witch was 
turned on at nites. 

The side with the Noze Ark fixtrs, he 
fixed up with common dark wall-paiper, 
and it was lit up at nite with a old coal 
oil lamp. I suggested that we awt to 
call the old 1 "befoar," and the new 1 
"affter," like a patient medycine add. 
But Vilet had beet me 2 it & had 2 nise- 
ly printed cards, 1 beeing, "Ancient," 
& the other, "modern," witch wear put 
in the 2 sidzs ov the windy respectab y. 

Youd athawt we was exhibityn man- 
eatin goofers the way peepls crowded 
around that windy. 

Bill afterwadze explnd to me that the 
old junk had been taken out of the 
house ov 1 ov hour leadin cityzens just 
the weak befoar & their wear still 
a bunch of the same kind of fixts in 
menny of hour best hoams. 

That exhbt must hev got on the con- 
sence of the popelace for overhawl 
jobs begin to come in regler wich was 
a good thing as the builden seazen was 
abt over & we was gettin slack. 

So Ive came to the concln that win- 
dys are like men and wimmen. If 
their well dressed, peeples will take 
notis — if their not the world passes 
them up. 

With witch remks I draw to a cloze. 

Yourze Jerry. 



27 



Market Conditions and Tendencies 



Price Trend on Sanitary and Heating Supplies 



Markets at a Glance 



AN IMPORTANT list of price revisions appear- 
on the current sanitary and heating markets. 
The changes include both advances and de- 
clines. It was outlined in some quarters that the 
turn of the year would most probably produce 
new quotations on various lines, principally of an 
upward direction, however, owing to the strength- 
ening tendency evident in the undertone of certain 
basic commodities. A summary of the current 
market changes indicates that increases are more 
numerous than reductions. Higher price levels 
are noted on hot air furnaces, both pipe and pipe- 
less; also stoves and ranges; lead products, includ- 
ing sheets, wool and solders, terne plates, pig iron, 
brass and copper rods, tubing and sheets. There 
has also been a change in the list prices on larger 
sizes of eavestrough and conductor piping. New 
price lists are issued on radiator valves and union 
elbows, with varying discounts at present being 



quoted. The reductions include such products as, 
the Penberthy line of brass injectors, ejectors, air 
and pet cocks, water gauges, nickel-plated basin 
supplies, cement in carload lots, stop and waste 
cocks, and closet combinations. There has been 
no change in cast iron fittings, as yet. The up- 
ward tendency remains in cotton wastes, while de- 
livery of wrought piping from the mills is now 
described as on a slightly better plane. Radiators 
remain on a firm price basis, with an upward ten- 
dency also noted in bar iron and steel. An un- 
usual feature in the sheet markets is the upward 
trend in primary centres, and the fact that some 
shading has occurred in an attempt to attract busi- 
ness during the quiet period in certain domestic 
markets. The outlook for trade during the coming 
months for such lines as enameled ware, soil pipe 
and fittings, corrugated sheets, and asbestos pro- 
ducts is stated to be good. 



Montreal Markets 

MONTREAL, Jan. 13. — A lengthy budget of price revisions is 
announced in the markets for plumbing and steam-fitting sup- 
plies. Advances are more numerous than declines, and the 
following are now quoted at higher levels: hot air furnaces, both 
pipe and pipeless, also stoves and ranges, lead products, including 
sheets, wool and solders, terne plate, and pig iron. Reduced quo- 
tations are announced on such lines as the Penberthy line of brass 
injectors, ejectors, air and pet cocks, water gauges, etc., nickel 
plated deep seal traps, stop and waste cocks and cement. Higher- 
waste prices are still expected in some quarters early in February. 
The wrought pipe market remains in a strong position, also other- 
lines of iron and steel products due to the firm tone in raw materials. 
No change is made in enameled ware quotations, these lines being 
quiet at the present time. 



STOVES AND FURNACES SHOW 
PRICE INCREASE 

Montreal. 

Revised price levels are now effective 
on stoves and ranges, also hot air fur- 
naces, iboth pipe and pipeless. Local 
manufacturers announce that new quo- 
tations are effective immediately, and 
show an increase of from five to seven 
per cent, on the various lines. The un- 
dertone of this market has been firm 
for some time because of increasing 
productive costs, and the present re- 
vision alloWs for the advanced costs of 
raw materials and 1 labor. 



REDUCED PRICES ON THE PEN- 
BERTHY LINE 

Montreal. 

Through a revision in discounts re- 
duced prices are quoted on the Pen- 
berthy line of injectors, ejectors, air 
cocks, water gauges, etc., the reduction 



amounting to approximately ten per 
cent. Following are revised discounts 
on some of the well-known lines; 



Injectors 55/10/5% 

Ejectors 70/10% 

Air or pet cocks 50% 

Water gauges, safe guard plus 5% 

Water gauges, standard 33 1/3% 



COTTER PINS NOW FIVE AND TEN 

PER CENT. OFF 
Montreal. 

A revision in an upward direction is 
announced in quotations on cotter pins, 
these now being quoted less 5 and 10 
per cent. Former discounts was 10 an 1 
10 per cent. 



FURTHER SLIGHT ADVANCE IN 
PIG IRON QUOTATIONS 

Montreal. 

That pig iron is on a firm market 
trend is evidenced by a further slight 
inc-ease in quotations. Domestic iron 



is advanced seventy-five cents per ton, 
bringing the present local price to $34.- 
90 per ton. While the low price reached 
prior to the advance of a few weeks 
ago was considered well down to bot- 
tom, and the trend would probably be 
upward in future for this reason, im- 
proved demand has also played an im- 
portant part in this market. 



SLIGHT REDUCTION IN CEMENT 
QUOTATIONS 

Montreal. 

After remaining on a steady basis for 
some months past, quotations on Port- 
land cement now show a reduction of 
minor proportions, approximately six 
cents per bag. The buying movement 
of this product is slow at present, al- 
though business is described as season- 
al, with prospects of brisk actiyitv r 1 -^-- 
ing earlier spring and summer months. 
Current quotations at the levision are; 

CEMENT — 

Car load lots, per bag. f.o.b. 

Per bag. f.o.b. steam cars 86 

Per bag. delivered 94 

Less car lots, per bng. f.o.b., yard ... 94 

Per bag. delivered 1 04 

Less 5 per cent. 

Rebate of 20 cents for empty bags. 



VARIOUS LEAD PRODUCTS MOVE 
UPWARDS IN PRICE 

Montreal. 

A quite extensive revision is record- 
ed in the market for lead products 
when lead wool, sheets and solders are 
advanced in price. Wool is up one cent, 
per lb., sheets one-half cent in the vari- 
ous weights. Solders, with the excep- 
tion of wire solder, are advanced one- 
half cent. Wire solder in two cents psr 
noun<3 higher. Metals ow primary mar- 
kets continue to display a very firm un- 



2J 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



January 15, 1923 



dertone, tin spelter and lead being the 
strongest. Although lead has remain- 
ed in a very strong market position for 
some time past there is no indication at 
present of any easing. This movement 
comes as more or less of a surprise to 
some well informed who were of the 
opinion that the advance had spent it- 
self before- the close of last year. 

LEAD AND ZINC PRODUCTS— 

Lead pipe, per 100 lbs., up to 2" 14 00 

Do., 21' to 8" 15 00 

Do., 8" and over 16 00 

Lead waste, per 100 lbs 15 00 

Note — Lead pipe is subject to a discount of 10%. 

Lead traps and bends 15% 

Lead wool, lb 14% 

Lead sheets, 2% lbs., sq. ft. lb.' 12 

Lead sheets, 2 1 /. lbs., sq. ft. lb 12 

Lead sheets. 3 to 3% lbs., sq. ft. lb... lil% 

Do., 4 to 8 lbs., sq. ft. lb 10% 

Cut sheets, %c. lb. extra and cut sheets 
to size, %c. lb. extra. 

Solder, guaranteed, lb 27 

Do., strictly, lb. . . 24 

Do., commercial, lb 23 

Do., wiping, lb 23 

Do., wire, lb 38 

Zinc, 6heets, casks 11 

Do., broken lots 11% 



GENERAL ADVANCE IN HAMMER 
QUOTATIONS 

Montreal. 

Local jobbing houses have now re- 
ceived new price lists on hammers show- 
ing advanced quotations on nail, rivet- 
ing, and sundry lines. The increase is 
from five to ten per cent, on the various 
grades, such lines as machinists' black- 
smiths' and tinners' hammers, mauls and 
wedges showing changes of a minor na- 
ture. 



HIGHER COTTON WASTE PRICES 
STILL LOKKED FOR 

.Montreal. — — 

Although new advanced quotations on 
cotton wastes were anticipated around 
the first of the year these have not yet 
made their appearance. The market, 
however, remains in a very firm posi- 
tion and one local dealer stated that a 
revision was still looked for and would 
probably be announced around the mid- 
dle of the month or early next month. 
Other lines of cotton goods are now 
higher in price which denotes the strong 
tendency in raw cotton circles. Pre- 
vailing net prices are the following: 

COTTON WASTES— Per lb. 

Cream polishing 19 

White, XXX extra 17 

White, XX grand 16 

White XLCR 15 

X Empire 13% 

X Press 12 

Colored — 

Fancy 14 

Lion 12% 

Standard 011 

Popular 09% 

Keen 08 

Wool Packing — 

Arrow 24 

Axle 20 

Anvil 16 

Dominion Wipers — 

White cotton 20 

Colored cotton 14 



WIRE NAILS ADVANCED TO $4.00 

BASE 
Montreal. 

Following the firm trend of wire and 
wire goods in primary markets, due to 
a brisk demand and higher production 
costs through higher raw material val- 
ues, wire nails are advanced on the lo- 



cal market twenty-five cents per keg. 
This brings the quotation to $4.00 base. 
In announcing this revision local mills 
state that a very firm undertone exists 
in wire products generally and a further 
announcement covering other lines may 
be- made at an early date. 



WROUGHT PIPE MARKETS STILL 
DISPLAY FIRM TONE 

Montreal. 

Much the same conditions prevail in 
wrought pipe markets as have been out- 
lined in previous reports, a firm tone be- 
ing still behind in deliveries. Local 
mills are also experiencing the difficulty 
of securing supplies of raw materials. 
List No. 57 still governs domestic quo- 
tations. 



COPPER RIVETS AND BURRS HAVE 
REVISED DISCOUNTS 

Montreal. 

Through a revision in discounts, ad- 
vanced prices are recorded on both cop- 
per rivets and burrs. Copper rivets 
with the usual proportion of burrs are 
now quoted at less 25 per cent., while 
copper burrs separately are plus 20 per 
cent. 



REDUCTION IN N. P. DEEP-SEAL 
TRAPS 

Montreal. 

A reduction has been made in quota- 
tions on 1% inch deep-seal nickel plated 
traps and these are now quoted at $5.50. 
IVi inch are selling at $3.40. 



REVISED DISCOUNTS ON STOP AND 
WASTE COCKS 

Montreal. 

As stated in previous reports changes 
in quotations on certain lines of com- 
pression goods were expected by local 
distributors. Manufacturers announce 
that discounts on both flatway and 
roundway stop and waste cocks are re- 
vised, and lower prices are now quoted 
on both lines. The discount in both in- 
stances is 56 per cent. It is also un- 
derstood that radiator valves are now 
priced on a new list and discount, but 
up to the present time local jobbing 
houses are still quoting for former list 
prices. Following are prevailing dis- 
counts; 

VALVES — 

Compression work, standard 46% • 

Fuller work, standard 80% 

Quick opening compression bibbs 43% 

Bath cocks, quick opening 41% 

Bath cocks, compression 41% 

Basin cocks, quick opening 46% 

Flatway stop and waste cocks, standard 56% 
Roundway stop and waste cocks, st'nd'rd 56% 

Brass steam cocks, standard, % in 60% 

R;idiator valves, standard 58% 

Do., removable discs 58% 

Quick Opening radiator valves 60/5% 

Globe, angle and check valves, standard 26% 

Gate or straightway 2g% 

Emco globe valves 38% 

Emco check valves 88% 

Jenkins globe, angle, check and swing 

check io% 

Jenkins gate or straightway 16% 

Montreal. 

Jenkins iron body, globe and angle 15% 

'-nl'-ns iron body. g:ite 25% 

N. P. "O" nnd "3" traps 40% 



INCREASED QUOTATIONS APPEAR 
ON TERNE PLATE 

Montreal. 

In the local sheet markets higher- 
prices on terne plate, announced by job- 
bing houses, attracts attention. Quota- 
tion on the 112 sheet boxes are advanced 
seventy-five- cents per box. It is stated 
that this revision is made in face of a 
firm market tone in production centies, 
and former prices were at a level which 
offered a very narrow margin of profit 
for distributors. Advanced quotations, 
on tin plate- in the near future are pre- 
dicted in some quarters. Galvanized 
sheets remain on a steady to firm basis, 
and although there is no definite indica- 
tion of a change in prices the tendency 
is undoubtedly upwards. The quieter 
winter months are passing and distri- 
butors are apparently quite willing to 
carry stocks over the remainder of the 
winter because of the firming tendency 
in the market, rather than sell at any 
lower levels in the hope of clearing the 
decks for spring business. Black sheets 
are very quiet with no particular change 
in the market. 

BLACK SHEETS— 

10 gauge, base 4 2,j 

12 gauge 4 35 

14 gauge 4 45 

16 gauge 4 55 

18—20 gauge 4 80 

22—24 gauge 4 85 

26 gauge 4 90 

28 gauge 5 10 

GALVANIZED SHEETS — 

Queen's Head Fleur de Li* 

28 gauge 7 25 7 00 

26 gauge 7 00 6 75 

24 gauge 6 70 6 45 

22 gauge 6 65 6 40 

18—20 gauge 6 40 6 15 

Other Brands — 

10% oz 7 00 

28 U. S. base 6 50 

26 U. S. base 6 25 ■ 

24—22 gauge 6 10 

20—18 gauge 5 90 

16 gauge 5 75 

Above prices are for % ton lots in English 

iron and 1000 lb. lots in American iron with an 

extra charge of 25c. for less quantities. Extra for 

sheets 3 ft. wide, 28 gauge and 10% oz.. 25c. per 

100 lbs. Further extra for sheets 4 ft. wide 

according to gauge. 

TIN PLATE — 

20 x 28 x 100 lb. basis 12 25 

20 x 28 IC, 112s 12 75 

20 x 28 IX, 112s 15 00 

20 x 28 IXX. 56s 8 50 

20 x 28 IXXX, 56s 10 00 

TERNE PLATE— 

20 x 28 IC, 112s, 200 lb 13 25 

20 x 28 IC, 112c, 214 lb 13 75 

CANADA PLATE— 

Half bright 52s 4 85 

Half bright 60s 4 90 

Blued 52s 5 10 

Blued 60s 5 15 

Welsh, polished, 52s 6 50 

Welsh, polished, 60s 6 75 

Galvanized 52s 7 25 

Galvanized 60s • 7 75 

STEEL MARKETS IN SATISFACTORY 
POSITION 

Montreal. 

In spite of only a seasonal amount of 
business from local warehouses distri- 
butors of bar products pronounce the- 
market a being in a satisfactory posi- 
tion. There is a firm undertone in pro- 
duction circles, the market described as 
stronger at the present time than for 
some time past, and this condition is not 
usually in evidence during the quieter 
winter period. Quotations locally are 
unchanged with the exception of domes- 



January 15, 1923 SaNITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAM FITTER 



tic sp-ing steel which is twenty-five 
cents per 100 lbs. higher. 

BAR IRON — 

Common bar iron, 100 lb., 3 15 

Refined iron ■ • ■ • -1 *>j 

Irish finish machinery ste-l 3 '20 

Mild steel 3 15 

Single reeled machinery steel '>'■ 

Band steel 3 50 3 «6 

Spring steel 5 uo H ol) 

Sleighshoe steel 3 15 

Tire steel 3 3 ■ 

Harrow tooth steel 3 30 

Toe caulk steel 4 05 

Mining tool steel, per lb 20y 2 

Black Diamond tool and cast steel, per lb.0 20% 
NOTE — Refined iron is approximately $1.50 per 
100 lbs. over base, but fluctuates owing to un- 
settled market. 

Band steel in scroll bundles, 50c par 100 lbs. 

•xtra. 



are in good shape, in fact more than 
ample to take care of present require- 
ments. Following are list prices and 
discounts; 

CORRUGATED SHEETS — Per 100 Sq. Ft. 

Mo. 28 gauge 6 50 

No. 26 gauge 7 00 

No. 26. U. S. gauge 8 00 

No. 24 gauge 9 00 

No. 22 gauge 11 00 

No. 20 gauge 12 50 

No. 18 gauge 16 50 

Less 10 per cent. 

Lighter than 24 gauge and wider than 27 
inches, 75c. per square extra. 



STRONGER TONE SHOWN IN RADI- 
ATORS AND BOILERS 

Montreal. 

In outlining the market tendency in 
radiation and boilers one local manu- 
facturer stated that recent develop- 
ments in raw material and production 
costs had somewhat strengthened the 
situation on these products. Pig iron 
was now firmer in tone, and fuel costs 
were higher and still hard to obtain. 
Domestic labour had not yet increased 
but it was noted that m'oulders in the 
United States were to be granted higher 
wages and this would possibly follow 
here. There was, however, no indica- 
tion of any revision in prices 'on either 
line at the present time, but certainly 
the tendency in the market was upward. 
Another manufacturer was of the opin- 
ion that nothing would be done in the 
matter of advancing price levels for 
some little time at least. Unfortun- 
ately there was a certain amount of un- 
settlement in the market and this had a 
tendency to weaken the position. Fol- 
lowing are prevailing quotations; 

RADIATORS AND BOILERS — 

Radiator list prices are for 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 
column radiators, per sq. ft. 

45 in. to 38 in., $ 1 ; 32 in., $1.10; 30 in., $1.15 ; 
26 in., £1.20; 23 in, $1.26; 22 in., $1.30; 20 in., 
$1.36; 18 in., $1.40; 16 in., $1.50; 14 in.. $1.55; 
13 in., $1.60. Discount 55 per cent for hot 
water, and 56 per cent for steam. 

Wall radiators— 5 ft., $1.15; 6 ft., $1.10; 7 ft., 
$1.05; 9 ft, S1.05; 12 ft., $1.05; Discount 52 
per cent. 

Boilers — Roulnd hut water boilers, sizes from 
to 10, 60 per cent, off list. Square or sectional 
hot water or steam boilers, 15 in., 15 per cent. 
Square or sectional water boilers, 19 in. to 36 
in., 20 per cent. Square or sectional steam boil- 
ers, 19 in., to 36 in 17 per cent. Ontario Gov- 
erment trimmings, 15 per cent. 

Round steam boilers, standard trimmings, 28 
per cent. Ontario Government trimmings, 25 per 
cent. 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. Guelph. 



STEADY MARKET TONE REMAINS 
IN CORRUGATED 

Montreal. 

When discussing the firm tone in gal- 
vanized sheets and the possibility of its 
reflection on corrugated sheets, a local 
manufacturer stated that he did not 
think the upward tendency was of suf- 
ficient extent to affect these products. 
Importers of English sheets had an- 
nounced a minor revision in flat sheets 
owing to the strong market overseas, 
and the increased exchange rate, but 
the fact that they were now in the 
midst of a dull period would offset this 
tendency, for the present at least. Stocks 



NO CHANGE IN QUOTATIONS ON 
CLOSET OUTFITS 

Montreal. 

No new prices have made their ap- 
pearance on closet combinations, al- 
though it was thought by some that 
some development along these lines 
might be recorded around the begin- 
ning of the year. Distributors] state 
that there is little enough profit on 
these products without any announce- 
ment of lower quotations. It is also 
felt that a change downward would only 
prove detrimental to the supply houses 
as there has for some time been a more 
or less unsettled condition in the mar- 
ket, and easier prices would not tend to 
establish a more stable market tone. 

CLOSET COMBINATIONS- - 

Low down outfits, each 

Closet, standard outfit, oak 25 00 

Do., post hinge seat 26 00 

Do., oak vitro or Pussyfoot 26 00 

Do., post hinge seat 26 20 

Do., mahogany vitro or Pussyfoot, post 

kinee seat and cover 28 45 

Do., vitreous china, oak post hinge seat 

and cover 28 45 

Do., vitreous china, mahogany post 

hinge seat and cover 29 50 

Do., white Vitro mahogany post hinge seat 

and cover 29 50 

Mahogany post hinge seat and cover .... 28 70 
Do., enamelled iron tank, oak post 

hinge seat and cover 29 50 

Do., enamelled iron tank, oak post hinge 

seat and cover '. 29 50 

post hinge seat and cover . 29 50 

Add for % in valve on supply pipe... 1 25 

Add for spud 60 

Add for reverse trap bowl 1 50 

Add for syphon jet bowl 7 00 

Deduct for supply pipe 80 

Deduct for floor hinge 60 

CLOSET BOWLS— 

Richelieu bowl 8 50 

Washdown bowl with spud 10 60 

Reverse trap bowl with spu'd 11 35 

Syphon jet bowl with spud 16 25 

CLOSET SEATS— 

Oak post hinge seat and cover 3 85 

Oak wood stri.p seat and cover 3 50 

Mahogany finish post hinge seat and 

cover 4 05 

closet tanks- 
low down, oak vitro with fittings, less 

seat 12 25 

White vitro or Pussyfoot with fittings. 

flush elbow and supply 15 65 

Vitreous china tank with fittings, flush 

elbow and supply 19 00 

Enamelled iron with fittings, flush 

elbow and supply 16 50 



There is no change in quotations, and 
following are list prices' and discounts: 

ENAMELED WARE— 

Sinks, roll rim — 

18 x 30 $23 00 

Sinks, flat rim — 1 only 2 only 3 only 

16 x 24 .* 7 60 $ 7 40 $ 7 30 

18 x 30 8 70 8 60 8 60" 

20 x 38 9 SO 9 80 9 70 

Bath tubs, roll rim, 4. 4%, 5 feet, 24 to 
30 in. wide 61 40 •• 

Bath tubs, 6V4 feet. 67 10 

Lavatories — 

17x19 in. Apron F139 or P4045 15 30 

18x24 in. Apron F164 or P3846 or P8847 23 60 

18x21 in. Apron F169 or P4205 17 60- 

17x19 in. Roll rim. F241 or P4346 12 60' 

Less 33 1-3 per cent. 



VERY LITTLE DOING IN ENAMELED 
WARE 

Montreal. 

Seasonal dullness is evident in enamel- 
ed ware, sales being spasmodic and for 
small quantities. Jobbers anticipate a 
quiet market for the following weeks, 
although prospects for a resumption of 
activity in spring months are bright as 
a good bui'ding year? seems assumed. 



MODERATE TRADE RECORDED IN 
BOILER TUBES 

Montreal. 

There is only a moderate amount of 
business being done in boiler tubes. 
Quotations on the various sizes are un- 
changed but these levels are firm ow- 
ing to the upward tendency in primary 
markets, where a fair amount of ac- 
tivity is noted, and deliveries somewhat 
delayed. Local distributors state that 
an improvement in the movement of 
tubes would in all probability mean 
higher prices as they are working from 
stock, and not forced into leplacement 
costs'. Unchanged average quotations 
are as follows; 

BOILER TUBES — 

Seamless Lapweld 

1 inch 20 00 

1*4 inch 22 00 

1V4 inch 21 00 

1% inch 24 50 24 0O 

2 inch 21 00 19 75 

2% inch 24 00 22 25 

Vk inch j... 27 00 23 25- 

3 inch 33 O0 29 50 

3V 2 inch 38 00 34 25 

4 inch 49 00 43 50 



CONTINUED STRENGTH OF LEAD 
FEATURE OF METALS 

Montreal. 

Quotations on ingot metal markets 
are holding firm and in some cases have 
again advanced slightly, the new high 
point reached on lead being a feature 
on U. S. markets. Demand locally is 
still on the light side, but there should 
soon be an improvement and if the Eu- 
ropean situation takes on a more set- 
tled appearance a better tone is thought 
likely in all lines. 

TIN. — This metal has marked time re- 
cently both buyers and sellers being 
somewhat cautious, but the general 
feeling is bullish and the strength of 
Sterling exchange would seem to point 
to higher prices. Locally the market 
is quiet but firm at 43% cents. 

COPPER.— The American market is 
dull put prices are unchanged and al- 
though export business is light at pre- 
sent domestic demand continues good. 
Copper is still the cheapest metal on the 
list and there are said to be indications 
of higher quotations in the near future. 
Prices remain at 18 and 17% cents for 
electro and casting respectively. 

LEAD. — Lead continues very firm in 
the U. S. with prices advancing daily, 
and $7.40 East St. Louis has been naid. 
London is a little lower but is fairly 



30 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



January 15, 1923 



strong - in tone and advances are expected 
there. The local market is strong at 8 
to 8% cents. 

SPELTER.— The market in the Unit- 
ed States has sagged slightly especially 
for forward deliveries, hut this is pro- 
bably temporary as stocks> are still on the 
low side. London receded a little last 
week but has recovered some of this 
since. Indications are said to point to a 
firm market especially when Europe 



again starts buying on this side. Quo- 
tation is from 9% to 10 cents. 

ANTIMONY. — Antimony is temporar- 
ily at least very firm and offerings from 
China are light. The local market is 
almost bare of supplies and prices are 
firmer at 8 cts. for English, 7M> cts. for 
Chinese. 

ALUMINUM.— There is no new fea- 
ture in the aluminum markets and quo- 
tation remains at 22 cents. 



Toronto Markets 

TORONTO, Jan. 13. — A fairly heavy budget of price revisions 
features the plumbing markets during the early weeks of the 
year. Developments include both increases and reductions. 
Higher prices are recorded on furnaces, both pipe and pipeless, also 
stoves and ranges. There has been an upward change in the list 
prices on the larger sizes of eavestrouerh and conductor pipe, while 
a similar revision is made in quotations on copper and brass products. 
A further increase in pig iron attracts attention to the trend of cer- 
tain basic elements. On the other hand some easier levels appear 
on closet combinations, this change being foreshadowed in the last 
issue of Sanitary Engineer. There is also a decline in prices on 
stop and waste cocks, while cement costs are reduced in carload lots 
only. New lists are issued on radiator valves and union elbows, with 
varying discounts applying to same at present. A slight reduction 
is also evident on nickel-plated basin supplies. 



EASIER PRICES ON CLOSET 
COMBINATIONS 

Toronto. 

A reduction of approximately two dol- 
lars each is made on closet combina- 
tions. This downward revision was fore- 
shadowed in the report contained in the 
last issue of Sanitary Engineer. The 
revision appaes to all outfits, as listed 
below. Closet bowls, tanks and seats, 
however, remain unchanged in price. 
Following are the revised quotations on 
these products: 

CLOSET COMBINATIONS— Each 

Oak. Wood Tank, Oak W. S. Seat 

and Cover 24 00 

Oak Vitro Tank, Oak W.S., Seat 

and Cover 24 00 

Oak Pussyfoot Tank. Oak W. S. Seat 

and Cover 24 00 

Oak Wood Tank Oak P.H., Seat and 

Cover 24 50 

Oak Vitro Tank, Oak P.H. Seat and 

Cover 24 50 

Oak Pussyfoot Tank, Oak P.H.. Seat 

and Cover 24 50 

White Vitro Oak Woodstrip Seat and 

Cover :.l 25 50 

White, Pussyfoot Oak Woodstrip, Seat 

and Cover 25 50 

WhiU' Pussyfoot. Woodstrip Seat and 

Cover 26 50 

White Vitro Tank, Mahog., P. H. Seat 

and Cover 26 50 

White Pussyfoot, Mahog., P.H. Seat and 

Cover 26 50 

Wlhite Vitro or Pussyfoot, oak, P.H. 

Seat and Cover 26 00 

Mahotf. Pussyfoot, Mahogany P.H.. Seat 

and Cover 27 00 

Vitreous China Tank, Oak P.H. Seat 

and Cover 27 00 

Enam. Iron Tank. Oak P. H. Seat and 

Cover 28 75 

Vitreous China Tank, Mahog., P.H. Seat 

and Cover 29 00 

Enam. Iron Tank Mahog., P. H., Seat 

and Cover 29 00 

ADDITIONS OR REDUCTIONS ON ABOVE— 
If supplied less bond or offset .deduct. . . 50 
If supplied with reverse trap bowl, add. 1 50 
If supplied with BOT Reverse Trap bowl 

Add 2 25 

If supplied with plain syphon jet bowl 

Add 7 00 



If supplied with N.P. stock cock on sup- 
ply Pipe. Add I 50 

If supplied less brass and rubber floor 

flange and bolts, Deduct 60 

If supplied less N. P. supply pipe deduct 60 
CLOSET BOWLS — 

Washdown bowl with spud 10 60 

Reverse trap bowl, with spud 12 10 

Syphon jet bowl, with spud 17 00 

"Richelieu" bowl 10 50 

CLOSET TANKS, low down. Oak, Vitro 
or Pussyfoot tank, with fittings, less 

seat 13 20 

White Vitro or Pussyfoot tank with fit- 
tings, flush elbow and supply 15 65 

Vitreous china tank with fittings, flush 

elbow and supply 18 00 

Enamelled iron tank with fittings, flush 

elbow and supply 18 00 

CLOSET SEATS— 

Oak post hinge seat and cover 3 65 

Oak wood strip seat and cover 3 50 

Mahogany finish post hinge seat and 

cover 4 05 

Oak Richelieu seat and cover 3 50 



PRICE DECLINE ON STOP AND 
WASTE COCKS 

Toronto. 

Through a revision in discounts, quo- 
tations on standard roundway and flat- 
way stop and waste cocks are slightly 
lower this week. The current level is 
now 56 per cent, off, as compared with 
the- former quotation of 54 per cent. 
This change affects the T lever and lever 
handle, while slightly revised discounts 
also appear on special lines, such as the 
patent guard or socket head stop, and 
stop and waste cocks. 

No uniform discounts have yet been 
announced on the new radiator valve 
price lists. In some cases, the former 
discount of 58 per cent, is being applied 
on the new list — which is reproduced 
elsewhere in this issue — while in other 
quarters a quotation of 60/10/10 per 
cent, has appeared. The reason for this 
is pointed out that the revised list is 
higher on some sizes. 



VALVES — Per 

Compression work, standard 

Fuller work, standard 

Bath cocks, compression 

Do., Fuller 

Flatway stop and wastceocks, stand"d. . 

Brass steam cocks, standard V/' to 2" 
iDo., 2W to 3" 

Globe, angle and check valves, std 

Mueller globe, angle and check 

Mueller composition disc steam valves .. 

J.M.T. valves, screwed 

J.M.T. gate valves, screwed 

Jenkins gate or straightway, screwed... 

Jenkins, globe, screwed 

Radiator valves, standard 

Do-, removable disc 

Em co. J. D.. rad. valves, screwed 

Emco swing check, %" and %" 

Do., other sizes 

Webber gate valves, screwed 

Emco globe valves, std 

Emco globe valves, J.D., screwed 

Basin Cocks — 

No. and 1 Fuller pattern 

Quick opening No. 3633 

No. 3623, plain or index handle 



45 
30 
4) 
25 
56 
60 
43 
26 
25 
33 
10 
16 
1C 
10 
58 
58 
33 
40 



25 
33 

30 
50 
34 



NEW PRICE LIST ON RADIATOR 
VALVES AND UNIONS 

Toronto. 

New lists and discounts are being 
adopted on radiator valves and union el- 
bows. At the time of going to press, 
the new lists were available and these 
are re-produced below, but the discounts 
applying to same had not yet been defi- 
nitely decided upon. However, it is ex- 
pected that a decision will be reached 
within the next couple of days and the 
revised quotations will automotically be- 
come effective from January 1. In plac- 
ing these revisions into effect, manufac- 
turers point out that under the former 
list and discounts some sizes were con- 
sidered too low in price and others too 
high. Thus the present change is more 
in the nature of a readjustment. Fol- 
lowing are the new list prices: 

STEAM RADIATOR VALVES— 

Composition disc, Without valves. 

No. 32— Size V 2 'nch, $3.40; % in.. $3.85: 1 in.. 
$4.50; 1V4 in., $5.65; 1% in.. $7.40; 2 in.. $12.10. 

Composition disc with union — 

No »4-^Size % in., $4.30. 1 in.. $5.10; 1% in., 
$G40; IVi in., $8.40; 2 in., $13.60. 
QUICK OPENING HOT WATER RADIATOR 

VALVES— 

Without union. 

No. 37—% in.. $3.25; 1 in.. $3.90; 1V4 in., 
$5.00; 1% in., $6.30; 2 in., $10.50. 
With union — 

No. 39—% in.. $3.70; 1 in.. $4.50; 1% iu,. 
$5.75: IV, in., $7.30; 2 in., $12.00. 
BRASS UNION ELBOWS— 

No. 41— Size % in., $2.00; 1 in., $2.50: IVi in., 
$3.30; 1% in.. $4.25; 2 in.. $7.20. 

Above list prices each — Subject to discount. 



SLIGHT PRICE REDUCTION ON 
BASIN SUPPLIES 

Toronto. 

A slight reduction is now made on 
nickel-plated basin supplies, size % in. 
These- are now quoted at $1.90 per pair, 
compared with the former level of $2. 



INCREASED PRICES ON COPPER 
AND BRASS 

Toronto. 

The stronger tone which recently de- 
veloped in the copper markets, both on 
ingot and semi-finished products, has 
now resulted in an increase of approxi- 
mately one cent per lb. on both brass 
and copper rods, tubing and sheets. This 
upward tendency was referred to in the 
last issue of Sanitary Engineer, and was 
considered as more or less foreshadowed 
by the recent trend of events in primary 



January 15, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



31 



centres. While current business in these 
goods is described as moderately fair for 
this season, conditions in some quarters 
are,; outlined as better than anticipated 
and the domestic market tone has re- 
mained fairly strong. Following are 
revised quotations: 

BRASS — 

Sheets, base, per lb 26 

Roils, base, per lb 23 

Tubing, base, per lb 31 

COPPER — 

Rods, base, per lb. 29 

Soft sheets, plain. 16 oz. and heavier, lb. 30 
Do., plain tinned, 16 oz. and heavier, 

per lb 43 

Do., polishing. 16 oz. and heavier, lb. 36 

Tubing 34 

Copper, bus bars, base 29 



CHANGES IN LIST PRICES ON 
TROUGH 

Toronto. 

Higher list prices are now generally in 
effect on the fifteen-inch and eighteen- 
inch sizes of eavestrough, both ridge roll 
and valley. The discounts remain un- 
changed, but an advance of over 25 per 
cent, is made in the list. The actual 
extent of the increase, however, is of 
moderate extent. A similar revision 
takes place on conductor pipe in the five 
and six-inch sizes. These list prices are 
also advanced, but discounts remain the 
same. Other sizes of both trough and 
piping are unchanged at the former 
levels. Elbows also remain unchanged 
in price. These larger sizes in such 
products receive only few calls, which is 
pointed out as one of the reasons for 
the revision. The new quotations follow: 

TROUGH (EAVE) — 
O. G. Square Bead — 

Per 100 ft. Per 100 ft. 

8 inch $15 90 15 inch 34 50 

10 inch .. . . 17 70 18 inch 44 00 

12 inch 21 20 

0. G. Round and Half Round 

8 inch 16 90 15 inch 35 50 

10 inch 18 70 18 inch 45 00 

12 inch 22 20 

Less 70 per cent. 
PIPE (CONDUCTOR) — 

Plain, round or corrugated. 

Per 100 ft. in 10 ft. lengths. 

2 in., in 10 ft. lengths, list 18 40 

3 in., ii 10 ft. lengths, list 22 30 

4 in., in 10 ft. lengths, list 29 60 

5 in., in 10 ft. lengths, list 48 00 

6 in., in 10 ft. lengths 58 80 

Less 70 per cent. 
ELBOWS (CONDUCTOR) — 



2 inch, list 6 25 

3 inch, list 6 00 

4 inch, list 10 50 

5 inch, list 24 00 

6 inch, list 29 00 



Less 60 per cent. 



INCREASE OF FIVE PER CENT. 
ON STOVE PRICES 

Toronto. 

A general readjustment of prices on 
stoves and ranges is being made in- 
volving an approximate increase of five 
per cent. Manufacturers state that this 
upward movement has been decided upon 
in order to take care of higher labor and 
raw material costs. These latter factors 
have been pointed out in former issues 
of Sanitary Engineer. It is also stated 
that the maximum advance is not more 
than around seven per cent. Furnaces, 
both pipe and pipeless, are also affected 
by the change, as similar conditions pre- 
vail in regard to basic elements affecting 
these products. New prices are at pre- 



sent being figured, and will be available 
within the next few days. 



REDUCED PRICES ON CEMENT IN 
CARLOAD LOTS 

Toronto. 

As was outlined in a former issue of 
Sanitary Engineer, cement quotations 
are now reduced. This decline, however, 
is only effective on carload lots, at pre- 



sent, the extent of the reduction being 

around twenty cents per barrel. The 

change brings the barrel basis in quan- 
tity purchases to $3.45. The revised 
quotations follow: 

CEMENT — 

Carload lots, per barrel 3 45 

Less carload lots, per barrel, f.o.b. yard 4 35 

Per barrel, delivered 4 55 



Single bags, $1.15 each; 4 bags to barrel. 

Extra charge of $1.50 per load on less than 24 
bag lots. 

Rebate of 20 cents each for empty bags. 



STEADY TO FIRM TONE IN LEAD 
AND ZINC GOODS 

Toronto. 

Business in lead and zinc goods is de- 
scribed as keeping up in fair volume for 
this season, with prices on a steady to 
firm basis. Primary metals continue to 
hold the recent improvement, and this 
strength is reflected in the finished pro- 
ducts to a certain extent, as previously 
referred to. The termination of the in- 
ventory period now leaves the field 
clearer regarding prospects for the new 
year's business and an optimistic tone 
is generally evident. No change has de- 
veloped from the following local price 
levels, although some slightly higher 
levels are now evident in other centres: 

LEAD AND ZINC GOODS— 

Lead pipe, list, per lb 14 

Lead waste pipe, list, per lb 15 

Do., over 8 in., list, per lb 16 

Lead pipe is subject to a discount of ten per 
cent. 

Lead traps and bends, less 15 per cent. 
Lead sheets, 4 to 6 lbs., sq. ft. in rolls, lb. 
$0.09 Vo— 0.10. 

Cut sheets, %c to %c lb. extra and cut 
sheets to size. 1c lb. extra. 



Solder wire, per lb 31 

Do., commercial, lb 25 

Do., strictly, lb 23% 

Do., guaranteed, lb 26 V 2 

Do., wiping, lb 23% 

Zinc sheets, per lb 11 12 



FURTHER INCREASE IN PIG IRON 
QUOTATIONS 

Toronto. 

Pig iron also registers another in- 
crease, the extent of this further rise in 
price being seventy-five cents per ton. 
This revision, although of a compara- 
tively minor nature, indicates the trend 
of the market, and places current quota- 
tions at the level of $32.55. This is the 
second increase during the last few 
weeks, and prices have risen from the 
mark of $30.80 to $31.80, and now have 
attained the above figure, $32.55. It is 
pointed out that quotations in primary 
centres have been on the upward grade 
and this condition is reflected in domes- 
tic circles, together with more interest 
and a seasonal degree of activity. Coke 
prices also remain high. Just how far 
this development will affect the trend of 
finished products will be watched with 
interest. 



NO CHANGE IN DISCOUNT ON CAST 
IRON FITTINGS 

Toronto. 

Conditions with regard to cast iron 
fittings have been recently adjusted and 
the contemplated revision in prices on 
these products is now in abeyance. While, 
the opinion was formerly expressed' by 
several distributors that some easier 
levels would most likely appear in the 
early part of the new year, it is pointed 
out that any such changes would have 
been in the nature of price shading, as 
current market conditions, as well as' the 
raw material situation, hardly warrant 
any declines at this period. The former 
discount of 27 per cent, off remains un- 
changed. Other quotations are as 
follows: 



PIPE FITTINGS— Per Cent. 

Cast iron fittings 27 

Plugs, cast iron 27 

Do., solid 27 

Do., countersunk 27 

Bi_6hings, malleable ;.. 30 

Do., cast 30 

Unions, % in. to 2 in 45 

Do., y 8 in., 2% to 4 in 45 

Flanged unions, std 27 

Flanged Fittings 30 

Dart unions, blk., % to 2 in 34 

Do., Vs in., 2Vi to 4 in 23 

Do., galvd., add to black 30 

Nipples, blk., and galvd. to 4 in. 

close and short 65 

Do., 4% in. and larger ... 45 

Do., long, Vs in- to 4 in ... 60 

Do., 4% in. and larger . 50 

Do., running thread 35 

Couplings, 4 in. and under <. . 25 

Do., 4y 2 in. and larger R 

MALLEABLE FITTINGS— 



New piece list, effective June 1. 1922. 

1 in elbow, $0.32, $0.53 ; 2 in. elbow, *1.05. 
$1.70; 1 in. tee $0.43, $0.70; 2 in. tee. $1.45 
$2.40; 1 in. coupling, $0.33. $0.53; 1 in. locknut 
$0.15, $0.23 Discounts— Class A, less 60 per cent. 
Classes, B and C. less 70 per cent. 



SEASONAL QUIETNESS EVIDENT 
IN CORRUGATED 

Toronto. 

Only moderate trade is recorded in 
corrugated sheets, the seasonal quiet- 
ness being generally evident. These pro- 
ducts remain on a steady to firm basis, 
no change having been made in either 
list prices of discount. Another brisk 
season, however, is expected, with indi- 
cations of increased building activity as 
soon as the weather permits. Following 
are current quotations: 



CORRUGATED SHEETS— Per 100 Sq. n. 





6 


50 






00 




8 


on 






00 




11 


oo 




12 


50 






50 


Less 10 per cent. 






Lighter than 24 gauge 


and wider than 


27 



inches, $0.75 per square extra. 



UPWARD TENDENCY REMAINS IN 
COTTON WASTES 

Toronto. 

While no changes have yet developed 
with regard to cotton waste prices, the 
opinion still prevails that some further 
increases' are pending and will most like- 
ly become effective during the ensuing 
weeks. One manufacturer stated to 
Sanitary Engineer that, while the eon- 
temp' ated revised levels would not b° 
known this week, it was quite po-si^e 
that slightly higher quotations will ap 1 - 



32 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



January 15. 1923 



pear, especially if the upward trend of 
raw cotton continues to be reflected in 
this market. The present levels are as 
follows: 

COTTON WASTES— 

Cream, polishing 19 

White, XXX 19 

XX 17 

X 16 

XC ■ • MM 

XXX, extra W 

XX, grand 16 

XLCR J5 

X, Empire 13 M 

X press J* 

Colored, No. 1 13% 

No. 17 • 12% 

No 1A 11% 

No. IB 10% 

Fancy « 11 

Lion 12% 

Standard 11 

Popular 09% 

Keen "8 

Above lines subject to trade discount fcr quan- 
tity. 



GOOD PROSPECTS FOR ENAMELED 
WARE TRADE 

Toronto. — 

No developments have been recorded 
in enameled ware products, the former 
quotations still being 1 in effect- on these 
lines. Lists and discounts are unchanged, 
although a moderate reduction is being 
made on closet outfits. It is noted that 
in some quarters of the city a start has 
already been made on the 1923 building 
program, while in other cases some in- 
ferior finishing is being done on build- 
ings which were only partially completed 
last year. All these factors are pointed 
out as assisting towards current activity 
and good prospects for the ensuing 
months. 

enameled ware— 

Enameled Iron Baths, 3" roll rim, 4 ft,. 

4 ft. 6 in., 5 ft 51 40 

Do.. 5% ft 67 10 

Lavatories- — 

17x10" Apron F139 or P4045 15 30 

18x24" Apron F154 or P3845 or P3847 25 60 

18x21" Apron F169 or P4205 17 60 

18x21" Roll Rim. F197, F199 or 

P4655-6 15 40 

17x19" Roll Rim, F241 or P4345 12 60 

Sinks. Roll Rim, 16x24 in 18 10 

Do., 18 x 30 in 23 00 

Do., 20 x 30 in 24 70 

Sinks, Flat Rim— 3 only 2 only 1 only 

16x24 S7 60 $7 70 $7 80 

18x30 8 50 8 60 8 70 

20x30 9 70 9 80 9 90 

Above prices, list, less 33 1-3 per cent. 

All steel enamel baths. 4 and 4% ft $L4.00 

Do.. 5 ft 15 00 

Do., 5% ft 16 75 

Steel bath flotations only are net. 



RADIATORS REMAIN ON FIRM 
PRICE TREND 

Toronto. 

While some rumors have been in evi- 
dence regarding, the possibility of slight- 
ly advanced quotations on radiators in 
the near future, no development in this 
direction has been recorded. Manufac- 
turers state that the prospects for the 
year are good and brisk businesses an- 
ticipated. No change is being made in 
prices or discounts, it being pointed out 
that although pig iron is again firming 
up in price, this condition is not affecting 
the market tone unduly, as no revision 
was made in quotations while pig iron 
was recently fluctuating. Raw mater- 
ials are admittedly, however, on a firm 
trend, which is reflected to some extent 
on the finished products. Current quo- 



tations are unchanged at the following 
levels: 

RADIATORS — 

Revised radiator list prices are for 1. 2. 3, 4 
and 5-column radiators per square foot. 

38 in., $1; 32 in., $1.10; 30 in., $1.15; 26 in., 
$1.20; 23 in., $1.26; 22 in., $1.30; 20 in., $1.36; 
18 in., $1.40; 16 in., $1.50; 14 in., $1.55; 13 in., 
$1.60. 

Discount on 2, 3, 4 and 5 column standard 
sizes. 55 per cent, for water and 56 per cent, for 
steam. 

Discount on 1-column standard size, and 2, 3, 

and 4-column hospital sizes 47 per cent for water 

and 48 per cent for steam. 

Discounts on 1-column hospital size, water 33 

per cent. ; steam, 34 per cent- 
Wall radiators— 5 ft., $1.15; 6 ft., $1.10; 7 

ft., $1.05; 9 ft., $1.05; 12 ft., $1.05. Discount 52 

per cent. 

BOILERS— 

Water: 

Round 60 per cent, off list. Square 20 per 
cent, off list. 
Steam : 

Round, 25 per cent, off list; Square, 15 per 
cent, off list. 



DELIVERY OF PIPING NOW ON 
BETTER PLANE 

Toronto. 

"Very good for this time of the year," 
is the general expression regarding cur- 
rent business in wrought pipe. The de- 
livery situation, referred to in former 
reports, is now described as being a lit- 
tle better, but it is certainly not con- 
sidered as easy. The market remains on 
a very firm basis, with the call for piping 
in primary centres being such as to in- 
dicate that heavier requirements are be- 
ing anticipated for the coming months. 
List No. 57 continues to govern the local 
market. 

WROUGHT PIPE 
Price List No. 57. November, 1922. 

Standard Buttweld Pipe S/C 
Per 100 ft. 

Steel Gen. Wrot. Iron 
31k. Galv. Blk. Galv. 

Size 

% in 6.00 8.00 

y 4 in 3.96 6.00 7.20 9.30 

% in 3.96 6.00 7.20 9.30 

% in 5.02 6.55 7.31 8.93 

% in 6.10 7.82 8.86 10.70 

1 in 8.67 11.22 12.75 15.47 

1V4 in 11.73 15.18 17.25 20.93 

IV, in 14.03 18.15 20.63 25.03 

2 " in 18.87 24.42 27.75 33.67 

2V> in 29.84 38.61 

3 in 39.02 50.49 

3% in 50.60 64.40 

4 " in 59.95 76.30 

Standard Lapweld Pipe S/C 
Per 100 feet. 

Blk. Galv. Blk. Galv. 

Steel Gen. Wrot. Iron 

2 in 22.20 27.75 31.08 37.00 

2V> in 32.76 41.54 46.80 5«.16 

3 " in 42.84 54.32 61.20 73.44 

3'/, in 51.52 65.32 73.60 88.32 

4 in 61.04 77.39 87.20 104.64 

4'A in 71.12 90.17 1.07 1.27 

5 in 82.88 105.08 1.24 1.48 

6 in 1.08 1.36 1.61 1.92 

7 in 1.40 1.79 2.07 2.50 

8L in 1.48 1.88 2.18 2.63 

S in 1.70 2.16 2.51 3.02 

9 in 2.07 2.62 2.97 3.59 

101, in 1.92 2.43 2.82 3.39 

10 in 2.47 3.13 3.63 4.37 



RANGE BOILER TRADE BETTER 
THAN EXPECTED 

Toronto. 

In range boilers seasonal quietness 
prevails. The present volume of trade, 
however, is stated to continue somewhat 
better than usuallv expected for this 
time of the year. The undertone of the 
market remains firm, and little change 
in this direction is anticipated. No re- 
visions have been made in either lists or 
discounts, it being pointed out that raw 
materials and production costs are ap- 
proximately on the same basis as .when 



the last revision was made, which 
brought the following quotations into 
effect: 

RANGE BOILERS— 

Size. List Price. 

6-xallon »13 bu 

12 to 16 gallon 14 00 

18-eallon ij no 

26-gallon lo 60 

30-gallon 17 50 

35-gailon 20 CO 

40-gullon 22 76 

52-gallon 38 00 

6li-gallon 60 75 

82-gallon 74 UO 

100-gullon 103 O0 

120-gallon 117 00 

144-gallon 164 00 

168-galIon 187 00 

192-gallon 210 00 

Discounts, Standard weight, 40 per oent. 
Extra heavy, 30 per cent. 



FIRMNESS IS KEYNOTE IN SOIL 
PIPE MARKET 

Toronto. 

Firmness is described as the prevail- 
ing note in the trend of soil pipe fittings. 
This market remains on a steady tone, 
with current business keeping up fairly 
well for this season. While trade is 
moderate in volume for this time of the 
year, the prospects for increased activ- 
ity in building operations during the 
coming spring and summer is being an- 
ticipated by manufacturers and distri- 
butors. Discounts remain unchanged as 
follows: 
SOIL PIPE 

2 inch I,ess 33 1-3% 

3 inch Less 33 1-3% 

4 inch Less 33 1-3% 

5 and 6 inch Less 33 1-3% 

8 inch net 

FITTINGS— 

2 to 6 inch Less 45 per cent 

8 inch fittings net. 



TIN PLATE PRICES REMAIN FIRM 
AND UNCHANGED 

Toronto. 

In the tin plate market, prices gener- 
ally remain firm and unchanged. Do- 
mestic levels are steady, while it is noted 
that Welsh tin plate' prices have regis- 
tered slight increases. In the U. S. mar- 
ket the quotations for the first quarter 
of 1923 are being strictly adhered to, 
and there is apparently nothing to offer 
earlier than second quarter. 

PLATES, CANADA— Per box 

Ordinary, 52 sheets 4 90 

Dull, 60 sheets 5 00 

Blued and oiled, boxes 52's 5 50 

Do., boxes, 60's 6 60 

WELSH CANADA PLATES — 

Cold polished, 18 x 24. 60's 6 50 

Cold polished, 18 x 24, 60's 6 60 

PLATES. COKE TIN— 

IC, 20 x 28, 112 sheets 12 75 

IX, 20 x 28, 112 sheets 15 00 

IX. 20 x 28, 56 sheets 8 50 

PLATES. CHARCOAL TTN — 

IX, 20 x 28, 112 sheets 10 00 

IX X. 2 x 28 , 56 sheets 12 00 

PLATES, TERNE — 

IC. 14 x 20. 112 sheets 12 00 



BOILER TUBE BUSINESS IN 
NORMAL STATE 

Toronto. 

There is a reasonable amount of busi- 
ness in boiler tubes at the present time, 
according to the opinion expressed this 
week by distributors. Trade is more 
or less in a moderate condition at this 
period, but one factor of some impor- 
tance is that competition is not so keen 
as was formerly the case, and this is 
described as an indication that distribu- 
tors have new supplies of higher-priced 



January 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



Illlllllllll 





Illlllllllll 



Mueller Drum Traps 

If you could buy a better Drum Trap from a concern you know 
is reliable, for the same price as the ones you now use, you would 
be likely to consider the matter favorably at least. 

Mueller for many years has been making Quality Goods only. 
When a new product is added to the line, certain tests have to be 
passed before the name " MUEZLLIER " * s allowed on it. In the case 
of Mueller Drum Traps, each one is tested under pressure before 
leaving factory. 

4"x 8" is fitted with brass cover with sunken square as shown 
above, or with raised square on cover if desired. 

2 x 6" size is furnished with extension cover as illustrated. 

Your orders will be given preferred attention. 

H. MUELLER MFG. CO., LIMITED, SARNIA, ONT. 

Water, Plumbing and Gas Brass Goods and Tools. 
American Factory at Decatur, Illinois, U. S. A. Branches, New York and San Francisco 

Mueller Metals Co., Port Huron, Mich., Makers of "Red Tip" Brass Rod; Brass 
and Copper Tubing; Forgings and Castings in Brass, Bronze and Aluminum; 
also Screw Machined Products. 



Illlllllllllllllll 



.".4 



Sanitary Engineer. Plumber and Steamfitter January IB, 1923 



stocks on hand. No changes have de- 
veloped from the following levels, which 
are representative of current trans- 
actions: 

BOILER TUBES — 

Size Seamless. Lapweld 
% inch H9 00 $ 

1 inch 20 00 

IV* inch 22 00 

iVt inch 24 00 

1% inch 24 00 23 00 

2 inch 22 00 19 00 

2V* inch 24 00 21 50 

2'/ 2 inch 27 00 23 50 

3 inch 34 00 28 50 

3>4 inch 36 00 33 00 

3V> inch 38 00 33 00 

4 inch 50 00 42 00 



SCRAP MARKETS NOW SHOW 
FIRMER TENDENCY 

Toronto. 

Domestic waste material markets are 
looking much better than is usual at this 
time of the year. Local dealers report 
that there is more than the usual amount 
of business around, and prices have been 
showing strength. 

Dealers are showing quite an active 
interest in scrap metals, particularly 
copper, despite the fact that consumers 
have generally held off from the market. 
White metals are firm, but quiet. 

Scrap iron has not shown any weak- 
ness. The trend of things seems to be 
toward active buying, and higher prices. 

Scrap rubber has maintained its re- 
cently advanced levels, although demand 
has fallen off. 

The following are the usual averages 
of dealers' buying prices for large 
quantities: 

SCRAP MATERIALS — 

Scrap Iron 

Heavy melting steel 11 00 

Scrap pipe 6 00 

Steel turnings 10 00 

Malleable scrap 10 00 

Rails scrap 11 00 

Net tons — 

No. 1 cast 18 00 

Stove plate 14 50 

Car wheels (std) 14 00 

Scrap Metals 

Heavy copper wire 11 00 

Light copper 9 25 

No. 1 composition 9 00 

Red brass turnings 7 00 

Light brass 4 00 

Heavy yellow brass 5 25 

Heavy lead 4 50 

Tea lead 3 flo 

Scrap zinc 4 00 

Scrap Rubber 

Boots and shoes 2 25 2 75 

High rubber boots l 50 1 75 

Auto tires 25 50 

Solid tires 60 1 00 



UNUSUAL FEATURES IN SHEET 
MARKET 

Toronto. 

Current trade in galvanized sheets is 
now of a quiet nature. The market in 
general is considered to be upon a firm 
basis, although developments indicate a 
somewhat complicated condition in some 
quarters at the present time. The ap- 
pearance of an extra charge for deliver- 
ies smaller than a given quantity, indi- 
cates the strength of primary sheet mar- 
kets. On the other hand, slightly lower 
levels have appeared in some quarters, 
this being described as purely a local ef- 
fort to get business during the quiet per- 
iod. It is pointed out that deliveries 
are still very much delayed and by the 
spring it is anticipated that deliveries 



may be even further delayed owing to the 
anticipated increased volume of business. 
That such price levels will also be re- 
vised upward again in the near future is 
the general opinion. The following quo- 
tations represent the average current 
values: 

GALVANIZED SHEETS— 

Premier and Apollo 

10% oz 6 65 

U. S. 28 base a 6 25 

U. S. 26 base 6 95 

22 and 24 6 80 

18 and 20 5 65 

16 6 50 

12 and 14 5 35 

Queen's Head 

28 gauge base 7 15 

26 6 75 

24 6 45 

22 6 30 

Fleur de Lis 

28 gauge, base 6 90 

26 6 50 

24 ft 20 

22 6 05 

An extra 40c. per 100 lbs. is charged for Key- 
stone and Premier bands copper-bearing sheets. 

An extra is now charged on galvanized sheets. 
10% oz. and 28 ga., when shipped out in sheets 
3 feet wide. The extra charged over prices shown 
in 20c. per 100 pounds. 
BLUE ANNEALED SHEETS — 

10 gauge, base 4 20 

12 gauge 4 25 

14 gauge 4 30 

16 gauge 4 35 

BLACK SHEETS— 

18-20 gauge 4 90 

22-24 gauge 4 95 

26 gauge 5 00 

28 gauge 5 10 

A charge of 25c. per 100 lbs. is made for less 
than case lots. An extra 10c. per 100 lbs. is 
also charged on sheets 26 in. wide. 



GOOD OUTLOOK IN ASBESTOS 
PRODUCTS 

Toronto. 

Current trade in asbestos products is 
described as not very brilliant, but the 
outlook is good and the improvement re- 
cently recorded is being maintained. A 
firmer tone is evident on both domestic 
and primary centres, with local quota- 
tions remaining at the recent higher 
levels. Present discounts follow: 

ASBESTOS PRODUCTS — 
Pipe Covering — 

Air cell, 4 ply 50 per cent, off list 

Air cell, 3 ply 55 per cent, off list. 

Air cell. 2 ply 57% per cent, off list. 

Boiler Covering SI. 50 — ?2.00 per bag 

Asbestos Sheathing $8.00 per 100 lbs. 

Magnesia pipe covering less 35 per cent 



UPWARD TREND IN BAR IRON 
AND STEEL 

Toronto. 

An improved condition is generally 
evident in the steel markets. That some 
higher prices on bar iron may develop 
in the near future is the current antici- 
pation in primary centres, and this up- 
ward trend may result in local quota- 
tions on bar iron and steel firming up to 
the $3.40 level, according to local distri- 
butors who are naturally watching close- 
ly the current developments at produc- 
tion centres. Present levels hover be- 
tween $3.25 and $3.40, the former figure 
being most general, but the latter price 
being quoted in some cases according to 
specifications, delivery and the size of 
the order. Any firming up to this higher 
level, therefore, would practically consti- 
tute an advance of fifteen cents per cwt. 
Producers in the United States claim 
that existing prices represent a hard- 



ship, as the present margin is considered 
insufficient to cover costs and afford a 
reasonable profit. Accordingly, there 
has appeared a tendency to advance 
quotations $2 or $3 per ton, and the 
opinion prevails in some quarters that 
should there develop any increase in 
current activity, such an advance will 
probably become effective. Local levels 
remain unchanged as follows: 

IRON AND STEEL— 

Mild steel bars, base 3 25 3 40 

Mild steel bands, 3-16 base ... 3 76 3 90 

Bar iron, base 3 25 3 40 

Angle, iron base 3 35 3 50 

Horseshoe iron 3 90 

Tire steel 8 60 

Spring steel 7 00 8 00 

Sleigh shoe steel 3 40 

Cold rawn steel 4 50 

Toe caulk iron 4 10 

Hoop Steel 4 tf> 

Norway iron 12 60 

Crucible cast sheet steel 28 00 

Mining Drill steel 18 60 

Cast tool steel, high grade 30 00 

Cast tool steel, medium 18 00 



HOW PLUMBERS HANDLE THE 
THE RECEIPT TAX 

(Continued from page 11) 

one time which is over $10.00, the re- 
ceipt tax would apply as the payment is 
over $10.00 as provided by the Act." 

2. "In the case where a sale is made in 
excess of $10, the original counter sales 
slip being handed to the purchaser, the 
stamp cannot be attached to the carbon 
copy, or the carbon copy merely marked 
'paid' and retained in the merchant's 
possession without having stamp affixed. 
This would not conform to the Act which 
requires that the receipt given the cus- 
tomer must bear the stamp." 

3. "Where a customer makes pur- 
chases on behalf of others, the total 
amount of purchase being over $10 the 
tax applies as the payment is in excess 
of $10." 

4. "Where a customer makes a pur- 
chase of say $7 and pays the bill and 
later makes a purchase of $5.00 and the 
merchant is asked for a receipt covering 
the total, amounting to $12, tax ap- 
plies even though each individual sale 
was less than $10." 



FAVOR PROPOSAL 

(Continued from page 12) 

ture. Thus, any government tax that 
they were compelled to deduct from 
these discounts by either of these classes 
of trade, would seem to us to reduce their 
return on their efforts to a margin that 
was far below a fair amount for them to 
receive. So, to collect this sales tax 
from the consumer, it would be necessary 
for us to change our system of selling to 
the extent possibly of saying that our 
products were sold at $2.00 plus sales 
tax. At the present time all prices on 
our products are advertised at a certain 
set figure to the consuming public, and 
they do not anticipate paying any ad- 
ditional expenses for taxes when they 
receive their product. 



January 15. 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



35 



The Everlasting 
Veneer Toilet Seat 



Strong, Clean 
Hygienic 




This reliable, dependable 
toilet seat is made of 'i 
and 9-ply, air-seasoned 
wood veneer, held to- 
gether by our special 
wood cement. This ce- 
ment is, proof against 
heat, cold or dampness. 
The veneering is distri- 
buted according to the 
strain and wear required 
of the different parts. 
The Everlasting Seat will 
never crack, warp or 
split. 



It is a splendid seat for use in cold, damp basements 
where closets must be installed. The Everlasting Toilet 
Seat will meet, and successfully resist, these severe con- 
ditions of moisture, changing temperature, etc. 



Canadian 
Veneering Company, 
Incorporated 

Acton Vale Quebec 



WHAT IS YOUR 
ADVERTISING 
DOLLAR BUYING? 



High prices of materials and increased 
overhead have made necessary a 
stricter economy along mercantile 
lines. 



Advertising should be considered as 
well as the commodities in which mer- 
chants deal. 

By choosing only those publications 
whose circulation is accurately meas- 
ured, you not only practise economy in 
your advertising, but are assured that 
your money is buying a definite quan- 
tity of circulation. 

The Sanitary Engineer circulation 
is measured by the Audit Bureau of 
Circulations. Advertising placed in its 
columns is an economical investment. 




Are You Chasing Prospects? 

Most good merchant plumbers are 
hotfoot after Gas Water Heater busi- 
ness just now — 

But it's hardly worth while selling 
some heaters; your profit is all 
eaten up by return trips and adjust- 
ments. 



The Marvel — built in one piece — is 
simple and inexpensive to install and 
once installed it stays put. You keep 
all the profit. With its low cost, 
high efficiency, economy of gas con- 
sumption and neat appearances, the 
Marvel is easily sold — and, moreover, 
it stays sold. 

Sold Only Through Plumbers. 

Bastian Morley Limited 

125 Hanson St., Toronto, Ont. 




THE TRADE 

Is Respectfully Cautioned 
to specify 

RIVETED 
RANGE BOILERS 

Made by the old reliable 

TORONTO HARDWARE 
MFG. CO., LIMITED 



36 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter January 15, 1923 




Make 
1923 
a 

Gurney 



jjj; — ' ^"»//^V ^ 



Make 
1923 
a 

Gurney 





Gurney No. 26 Water Heater 

Gurney Water Heaters have in the past year entrenched themselves 
strongly in the public favor. But — 

There are still innumerable potential owners of Gurney Water Heaters. 
Builders and prospective builders of homes are sure prospects for this 
proven, economical household necessity. 

Thousands of settled homes would buy the efficient Gurney Heater if 
they knew of its easy installation and its year-round utility. 

You are on the brink of a big" vear in Gurnev Water Heaters. Develop 
this profitable line to the utmost and make 1923 a "Gurney" year. 

The Gurney Foundry Co. Limited 



TORONTO 



Cooking and Heating Appliances 

MONTREAL WINNIPEG 



VANCOUVER 



January 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND StEAMFITTER 



The only product which has 
anything to fear from publicity 
through the pages of this 
journal, is that which will not 
stand intelligent inspection by 
the Sanitary and Heating 
Engineers of Canada. 



That is why the best lines are 
to be found in the advertising 
columns of this paper. 



38 



sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



January iS, 11)23 




AIR LINE SYSTEMS 
C. A. Dunham. Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 
United Brassfounders & Engineers. Ltd., Man- 
chester, Eng. 

ALUMINUM CASTINGS 

Fittings. Limited, Oshawa. . 
Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
AIR VALVES 
Beaton & Caldwell Mfg. Co., New Britain, 
Conn. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill. Ltd., Toronto 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Samia, Ont. 

J. H. Wihams Co., Brooklyn. New York 

United Brassfounders & Engineers. Ltd., Man- 
chester, Eng. 

Wallaceburg Brass & Iron Mfg. Co , Ltd Wal- 
laceburg. Ont. 

Wolverine Ltd.. Toronto, Ont. 
BATHROOM FITTINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Gendron Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
BENDING SPRINGS 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
BOILERS, STEAM OR HOT WATER 

Gurney Foundry Co., Limited. Toronto. 

Lord & Burnham Co.. Ltd.. Toronto 

Spencer Heater Co.. Ltd.. Toronto, Ont 

Warden King. Ltd., Montreal. 

BOILER FEED REGULATORS 

Empire Mfg. Co London and Toronto. 

C. A Dunham Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto 
BOILER STANDS 

Fittings. Limited. Oshawa 
BOLTS, EYE 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn N Y 
BOLTS AND NUTS 

Fittings Limited, Oshawa. 
BRASS GOODS, VALVES ETC 

Canadian Brass Co., Ltd.. Gait, Ont 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

tL^ D «, ham Co - Ltd - Toronto. 

Gait Brass Co.. Limited. Gait. 

Tf F ^, ein< : Co ' Ltd - Walkerville. 

H Mn »° rr }K n ?, rass Mf S- Co- Toronto 

fi^ e l €T . me - Co ' Ltd - Sarnia, Ont 

St aSmon San,tary Mfg - Co - Ltd - T — to - 

U M?nch^r f °Eng erS ^ Ltd " 

Wal \l C ^,Vnt & Ir0 " MfS - C °- Ltd >" W *>" 

WoTverine Ltd.. Toronto, Ont. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto 
BRASS PIPE AND TUBE 

Canada Metal Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 

M^TI L ° ndon and Toron to- 

v x&£Z£ e 2£r & En8inee;s Ltd - 

Wolverine. Ltd.. Toronto. Ont 
CASTINGS 

Canada Metal Co.. Ltd.. Toronto. 

Jottings, Limited. Oshawa. 
CELLAR DRAINERS 

Gait Brass Co., Limited, Gait 

^~ e ™ fe - Ltd ^. London and Toronto. 

aSl s „""""' M " c °- ™™«°. 

CIRCULATORS 

r„ H ; ^H' 8 ™^ & Co ~ Brooklyn, N. Y. 
CH« CO ' e ^ • " RiV " T — • 

Fittings. Limited. Oshawa 

H - Williams & Co., Brooklyn N Y 
CLOSETS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg Co London and Toronto. 

Gait Brass Co., Limited, Gait 

H. Miller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg., Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Hamilton. 



CONDENSATION UNITS 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd.. Toronto. Ont. 

The Westco Pumps, Limited, Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
COUNTRY RESIDENCE EQUIPMENTS 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Sarnia, Ont. 
COUPLINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Fittings Limited, Oshawa. 
DAMPER REGULATORS 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
DRAINAGE FITTINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

Fittings Limited, Oshawa. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., Man- 
chester, Eng. 

Warden King, Ltd., Montreal. 
DRAIN PIPE SOLVENT 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd.. Toronto. 

Hercules Chemical Co., Inc., New York City. 
DRINKING FOUNTAINS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg., Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 
DROP FORGINGS 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
EJECTORS, STEAM 

Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
ENAMELWARE 

Amherst Foundry Co., Ltd., Amherst, N.S. 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

Gait Brass Co., Limited, Gait. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd.. Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

Port Hope Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Port Hope. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
ELECTRIC PUMPING MACHINERY 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
EXPANSION TANKS 

Toronto Hardware Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
FITTINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

Fittings Limited, Oshawa. 

.lames Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 

Warden King. Ltd., Montreal. 
FLUSH OMETERS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London ard X'oronto. 

Gait Brass Co.. Ltd., Gait. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnin, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

Wolverine Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 
FLOOR AND CEILING PLATES 

Beaton & Cadwell Mfg. Co.. New Britain, Conn. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

Fittings, Limited. Oshawa. 

Wolverine Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Samia, Ont. 
FURNACES 

Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto. 

Warden King, Ltd., Montreal. 

Spencer Heater Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Hamilton Stove & Heater Co., Homilton. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne, Hamilton. 

Hall-Zryd, Hespeler, Ont. 

Vulcan Co., London, Ont. 
GASOLINE ENGINES 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 



GAS WATFH HEATERS 

Bastian-Morley. Limited, Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 
James Morrison Brass Mfg., Toronto. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Sarnia, Ont 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill. Ltd., Toronto. 
GALVANIZING 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 

HEAT GENERATORS 

Gait Brass Co., Gait, Ont. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
HEATING APPARATUS 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
HEATERS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 

Lord & Burnham Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 

Warden King, Ltd., Montreal and Toronto. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd.. Toronto. 
HEATING SYSTEMS 

C. A. Dunham Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street. Toronto. 
HOIST HOOKS 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
JAPANNING 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 
KEROSENE WATER HEATERS 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd.. Toronto. 
LAUNDRY TUBS 

The Canada Metal Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Hamilton. 
LEAD 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co.. Ltd.. Toronto, 
Hamilton. 
MACHINISTS' TOOLS 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

MALLEABLE IRON CASTINGS 

Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto. 
Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 
MACHINE BOLTS AND NUTS 
Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 

MIXING VALVES 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

Port Hope Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Port Hope. 
PACKING 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
RADIATOR FOOT RESTS 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

Wolverine Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd.. Toronto. 

PACKLESS RADIATOR VALVES 

Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville. 
C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 
PIPE AND RADIATOR HANGERS 

Beaton & Cadwell Mfg. Co., New Britain. 
Conn. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

Healy-Ruff Company, Minneapolis. Minn. 
PIPE, BLACK AND GALVANIZED 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 

Canadian Tube and Iron Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Hamilton. 
PIPE CLEANSER 

Chamberlain Desolvo Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd.. London and Toronto 

Hercules Chemical Co., Inc., New York City. 

Wolverine. Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

PIPE JOINT COMPOUNDS 

Wolverine, Ltd.. Toronto, Ont. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 



January 15, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



30 



HE 

CO 

BUI 




Few people realize the tremendous selling power of classified adver- 
tising or the exceptional opportunity which it offers. 

Hundreds of Sanitary Engineers to-day are carrying equipment for 
which they have no further need, yet many others could use this 
same equipment to good advantage and would be glad to buy at a 
fair price, if they but knew of it. 

How to get buyer and seller together — that's the question. The 
answer is — SANITARY ENGINEER classified advertising service. 
Thousands of Sanitary Engineers throughout the country read the 
classified advertisements every issue. That's why they produce 
results surely and quickly. 

If you want to buy, sell or exchange equipment. 

If you want to sell or exchange your store. 

If you want to buy a store. 

If you are looking for a location. 

If you need a competent journeyman. 

If you are seeking a position. 

In fact if you wish to buy, sell or exchange anything used in a 
plumbing and steamfitting shop or for any reason desire to quickly 
get in touch with other Sanitary Engineers, use SANITARY 
ENGINEER'S classified advertising service. The charge is ridic- 
ulously low — $1.50 for twenty-five words, 5 cents for each additional 
word. 



Look For The Classified Column 

on Page 46 



40 



Sanitary E 



ngineer, Plumber and S 



TEAMFITTER .January 15, L923 



PIPE, SOIL AND FITTINGS 

Anth«s Foundry Co., Toronto and Winnipeg. . 
Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 
Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

Toronto Hardware Mfg., Co., Toronto. 

Warden King, Ltd., Montreal. 
PIPE THREADING TOOLS AND MACHINERY 

Borden Canadian Co., Toronto. 

A. B. Jardine & Co., Hespeler. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
PIPE WRENCHES 

J. H. Williams Co., Brooklyn, New York. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
PLUMBERS' TOOLS 

J. H. Williams & Co., Montreal, Que. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
PNEUMATIC WATER SUPPLY TANKS 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 
PORCELAIN WARE 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
PUMPS 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Limited. 

The Westco Puimps Limited, Toronto. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
PUMPING SYSTEMS, AUTOMATIC 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Limited. 

The Westco Pumps, Limited, Toronto. 

Beaton & Cadwell Mfg. Co., New Britain, Conn. 
RADIATORS 

Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto. , 

Lord & Burnham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Warden King Ltd., Montreal. 
RADIATOR HANGERS 

Healy Ruff Company. 
RADIATOR NIPPLES 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 
RADIATOR TRAPS (STEAM) 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co.. 23 River Street, Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Sarnia, Ont. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers Ltd., Man- 
chester, Eng. 



RIVETS 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 

RANGE BOILERS 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

The Canadian John Wood Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Toronto Hardware Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
REDUCING PRESSURE VALVES 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
RETURN TILTING TRAPS 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
ROOF FLANGES AND FLASHINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto, 
Hamilton. 

SEPTIC TANK VALVES AND SYPHONS 

Anthes Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
SINK BRACKETS 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 
SOCKETS, WIRE ROPE 

J. H. Williams & Co., Montreal, Que. 
SOLDER 

Canada Metal Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 

STEAM SPECIALTIES 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
STEAM TRAPS 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
STOVES 

Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto. 
STOVES, GAS AND COAL 

Gurney Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
SWIVELS, HOOK 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn. N.Y. 
TANKS, STEEL 
The Canadian John Wood Mfg. Co., Toronto. 



TANK BULBS, (RUBBER) 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
THUMB SCREWS AND NUTS 
J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

TOOLS 

Wolverine, Ltd.. Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

TORCHES 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
UNIONS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia. Ont. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd . 
Manchester, Eng. 
VAPOR HEATING SYSTEMS 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
VISES, CHAIN, CLAMP, MOUNT 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn. W.Y. 
VITRO TANKS 

Gait Brass Co., Ltd., Gait. 

VACUUM SYSTEMS OF HEATING 

C. A. Dunham Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 
VALVES 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 
Jenkins Bros., Ltd., Montreal, Que. 
The Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
United Brassfounders & Engineers Ltd., 

Manchester, Eng. 
WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS , 
Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Hamilton. 

The Westco Pumps, Limited, Toronto. 
WASHERS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill. Ltd., Toronto 
WASHING MACHINES 

Gurney Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
WRENCHES, SET, DROP FORGED, 
ENGINEERS, SOCKET AND CHAIN PIPE 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
WROUGHT COUPLINGS AND NIPPLES 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Fittings, Ltd., Oshawa. 





II 




lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllM 


m 


1 


BEAVER BRAND 

Porcelain Enamel Ware 

— Your Guarantee of Quality — 

Beaver Brand Enamelware by its ability to meet the 
highest demands for service under all conditions, 
has established itself in the confidence of the public 
to such an extent that each month witnesses an ever- 
increasing demand for products of Beaver manu- 
facture. 

Amherst Foundry Co., Limited 

General Offices and Factory: Amherst, N.S. 
Agents : 

ONTARIO: MANITOBA AND NORTHWEST: 
Monarch Brass Mfg. Co., E. B. Plewes, 
71 Brown St., Toronto 197 Princess St., Winnipeg- 


m 
M 




1 


lllllllllilllllilllllll^ 1 II Hill Illlllllllll!!! 


nllilllllliilllllllliilllHH IHIIIIIIIIIII HIIIIIIIIIK 



January 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND StEAMFITTER 



II 




TRY IT! The E-Z Radiator Hanger 

You'll only have to try it once because it always works satisfactorily and 
there is a demand for more all the time. 

It hangs radiators securely and is a real device to give a neat and complete 
finish to the interior of every home. 

The E. Z. Radiator Hanger has one Bolt, Invisible Washer. Horizontal 
Adjustment, Vertical Adjustment, Baseboard Adjustment. 
Made for Wall and Column Radiators. 

IMMEDIATE SHIPMENTS EROM LARGE STOCK. 



HEALY-RUFF CO. 



MADE IN CANADA 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 



J. H. Leonard, Tribune Bldg , Winnipeg 

D. G. Brison, Standard Bank Building, 
Vancouver. 

A. Walker. 51J McLean Bklg.. Calgary. 

E. T F'anrgan. 220 College St., Tor- 
onto. 



Eager Coombs & Co., Ltd., Halifax 

Can. 

Shaver Bros., Booth Bldg., Ottawa. 
S. T. Hadley, 304 University St., 
Montreal. 




Style R,' 




Long Fire Travel and Short Coal Bills. 

The less up chimney heat there is, the more 
boiler heat there is going to be. 
"Up chimney" heat means coal waste. 
In the illustration you will see that the Burn- 
ham Boiler fire travel is three times back and 
forth on both sides of the boiler. 
This means that the bulk of the heat is out 
of the gases before they enter the flue. 

(Boiler Department) 



Harbor Com. Bldg. 
Toronto. 




Factory— St. Cath- 
arines Ontario. 




Choose The Right Tool 



You can't expect a cheap, inefficient wrench to 
hold and turn rusted pipe or fittings. It's bound 
to slip or break. 

WILLIAMS' STILLSON WRENCH is depend- 
able; it is made for heavy duty. Drop-forged 
from special steel, carefully hardened and tem- 
pered, its sturdy strength is proof against the 
knocks and strains of hard service. The tough 
teeth retain their sharpness; they "bite" in- 
stantly, yet release readily. 

For grip, power and endurance, choose Williams' 
Stillson. Wood and Steel Handle patterns — 
eight sizes, 6 to 48 inches. Made in Canada. 

J. H. WILLIAMS & CO., LTD. 

"The Wrench People" 

77 Thorold Rd., St. Catharines, Ontario 





MARK 



ATTENTION! Contract Shops, Stores, Employers, Clerks, Mechanics, ete. 

Our new HOME STUDY course in BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION is now ready for 
the trade. It teaches you the most modern methods of Business. 

Learn to extend your Markets; enlarge your Business; Learn to adjust all the business 
combinations to the limit. We build on top of your present Ability and give you a 
business training equal to the best. 

We teach you in your own home or office, Clear, Personal, Direct. An Hour a Day 
will prepare you into a highly specialized Executive. Make ready for the next great 
prosperous Building wave. 

Full information free. 
COURSES IN MODERN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
COURSES IN SHEET METAL DESIGN AND PATTERN DRAFTING 
COURSES IN HEATING AND VENTILATING ENGINEERING 

ST. LOUIS TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 

4543 Clayton Ave. O. W. Kothe, Prim St Loais, M: 



42 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



January 15, *1 1)2:5 



Rates for Classified Advertising 

Advertisements under this heading 3c per word for first insertion; 2c for each subsequent insertion. 

Where answers come to Box number in our care to be forwarded, 5 cents extra per insertion must 
be added to cover postage, etc. 

Contractions count as one word, but five figures (as $1,000), are allowed as one word. 

Rates (payable in advance). When panels are desired a charge of $2.50 ,s made for a panel 1 
inch deep by 2V 8 inches wide. Minimum charge for any ad. $1.00. 



WANTED 



ANTED — TWO SALESMEN FOR STEAM 
specialties, experience with steam not neces- 
sary, but preferred. Apply Box 835, Sanitary 
Engineer. Toronto. 



SITUATION WANTED 

CALESMAN— WITH COMPLETE KNOWLEDGE 
^ of plumbing. Heating and Sheet Metal goods, 
also road experiences and good connections with 
the trade, in the Maritime Provinces, wishes to 
connect with good firm. For particulars, write 
Box 931, Sanitary Engineer, Toronto. 



When answering advertisements please 
mention Sanitary Engineer. 



FOR SALE 

T^AYLOR SAFES FOR SALE — RARE 0PP0R- 
*■ tunity to secure a safe at small cost. They 
are in splendid condition. Inside dimensions and 
prices are as follows: IB in. deep, 2 ft. 6 in. wide, 

3 ft. 11% in. high, fitted with built-in compart- 
ment. Price ?250.00. 18 in. deep. 2 ft. 8 in. wide, 

4 ft. 5 in. high, fitted with steel compartment 
Price $200.00 Apply Box No. 701, Sanitary En- 
gineer, Toronto. 



ADDRESSING MACHINE FOR SALE— WE 
r * have a complete Belknap Addressing Equip- 
ment for sale. This equipment is still in use in 
our Subscription Department and is in excellent 
working order. We have placed an attractive 
price on this outfit, and would advise manufac- 
turers or merchants having a mailing list to 
let us tell you how it will save you money. We 
will give a guarantee as to the proper working 
condition of this equipment. The MacLean Pub- 
lishing Co., Ltd.. 143 University Avenue. Toronto, 
Ontario. 



OPPORTUNITY FOR SALESMEN 

Wanted: Salesmen in various parts of Canada calling on retail trade, 
to carry sideline which we feel sure will be approved by his principals 
and will increase the purchasing power of his clients. 

Earnings will be on a commission basis and should amount to a substant- 
ial figure. Applicants must have good record for production, and must 
give satisfactory references as to character, reliability, etc. 

Apply, giving experience, references and names of firms by whom em- 
ployed during past ten years ; also state definitely the territory you 
cover and how frequently you go over the ground. No application 
considered unless this information is given. All applications will be 
treated in strictest confidence. 



Boxl600 

SANITARY ENGINEER, 143 University Ave., Toronto 



January 15, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



48 



Index to Advertisers 

Allison, K. B 5 

Amherst Foundry Co., Ltd . 40 

Anthes Foundry Co 2-3 



Bastian-Morley 

Beaton & Cadwell Mfg. Co. 



35 
44 



Canada Metal Co Inside Front Cover 

Canadian Tube & Steel Products ... 44 

Canadian Veneering Co., Inc 35 

Canadian Potteries, Ltd 1 

Crane, Limited 4 

Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., W. H. . . . 10 

Dart Union Co., Ltd. . . Inside Back Cover 

Empire Brass Mfg. Co., Outside 

Front Cover 

Forwell Foundry, Ltd 44 

Gait Brass Co Outside Back Cover 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp 8 

Gurney Foundry Co 36 

Healey-Ruff Co 41 

Jardine & Co., A. B 10 

Katie Foundry Co 44 

Kerr Eng. Co., Ltd. . . . Inside Back Cover 



Lord & Burnham Go. 



Martin, H. P. & Sons . . . 
Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., H. 



41 

44 

33 

St. Louis Technical Institute 41 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co 6-7 

Steel Trough & Machine Co 44 

Toronto Hardware Mfg. Co., Ltd. . . 



Want Ad. Page 

Warden King, L f d 

Williams & Co., J. H 

Wolverine, Limited 43 



35 

42 
5 
41 



You Can Buy Lower 
Priced Bibb Washers 

But 
Does It Pay? 




Satisfied customers 
rarely neglect to 
pay bills. Protect 
your labor charge 
by using Wolverine 
Quality Bibb 
Washers. 

Leather 

Grey Fibre 

Red Fibre 

Graphite Base 

Asbestos Base 

Pure Gum Rubber 

Largest and most 
complete line 
stocked in Canada. 

Equally effective in 
hot or cold water. 




76 Nelson S l Toronto- 




Union Washers — 
Rubber, Fibre or 
Paper. 

Material and sizes 
are right. 



It pays to have Wolverine articles on hand 
for instant use. ORDER NOW. 



44 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



January 15, 1923 




USE 

TESTED Soil Pipe 

IT COSTS NO MORE AND YOU KNOW THE JOB IS RIGHT 

Manufactured by 

FORWELL FOUNDRY, LTD. 

KITCHENER, ONT. 





Always 
Necessary 



AIR 



GEM NO. 4 AUTOMATIC 
VALVE 

This automatic air valve is made 
of the best brass obtainable and 
is equipped with high grade car- 
bon. The mechanism is perfect, 
every valve being guaranteed by 
us. Ask for a catalogue of Steam 
Specialties. We manufacture 
many of Interest to Canadian 
Plumbers and Steam Fitters. 



You can have as complete a 
finished piece of work as is 
possible if you insist on using 
reliable floor and ceiling plates. 
They hide all bored places in the 
ceiling. Are coming more in 
vogue all the time. 

The No. 10A Narrow Flange 
Plate is Steel Hinged. Flanges 
3-4 ins. wide. Highly Finished. 
Especially designed for Twin 
Connection. "Narrow" can be 
attached to mains and risers at 
the very last. 





The Beaton & Cadwell Mfg. Co. 

NEW BRITAIN, CONN., U.S.A. 

EASTERN AGENTS': WESTERN AGENTS: 

J. R. DEVEREAUX CO., G02 A. E. HINDS & CO.. Cham- 
New Birks Bldg., Montreal. her of Commerce. Winnipeg 
ONTABIO AGENTS: 
L. N. VANSTONE. 8 Welling- 
ton St. E., Toronto, Ont.. Can 
ada. 



The Martin Portable 
Vise Stand 

Light in weight — 
only fifty pounds 



Can be carried anywhere 
out inconvenience. 



ith- 





Easier to attac h 
More permanent 



Cost less 



Tapped Closet Bend 




Put up in two seconds; no bolts, screws or 
fastenings needed. 

Use the Martin Portable Vise Stand where 
pipe or conduit must be bent, cut or threaded. 
10 days free trial. 

If your jobber can't supply you — write us. 

H. P. MARTIN & SONS 

803 W. 12th Street OWENSBORO, KY 

CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVE : — L. F. Mayne, 875 Trafalgar 
Street, London, Ontario. 





NO. I "TWEED" 
Sanitary Closet with mahogany 
finished seat and lid with 
nickel-plated hinges. 

The special "Tweed" chemical 
used in connection with the closet, 
destroys every trace of odor. Easily 
installed. as no plumbing required. 



Out -of -Town Business 

Only those who have to live the year 
around in a locality without city 
conveniences realize the hardships in- 
volved, and it Is among these that 
you can do a profitable business with 
the 

"TWEED" 
SANITARY CLOSET 

A city convenience at a fraction cf 

the cost — anybody can afford one. 

Compactly packed for shipment and 

easily handled. 

We also make an attractive 
line of "Tweed" Baths and 
other home conveniences. 

Write for price lists and literature. 

Steel Trough & Machine Co., Ltd. 
TWEED. ONT., CANADA 
LOUIS A. PAYETTE. 
304 University St., Montreal. 
Quebec and Eastern Representative 



WROUGHT PIPE 

Suitable for the approaching period of 
building activity, road construction, etc. 
£r¥r^^ This is a line of great importance in 
■ J making successful, profitable contracts . 

Our C. T. Brand of Wrought Pipe has 
been 

THOROUGHLY INSPECTED 
by practical, experienced men. It is tested to 600 
lbs. hydraulic pressure, and branded with our trade- 
mark. We carry this line of reliable pipe in size? 
%-in. to 4-in. Black or Galvanized. We also manu 
facture nipples and couplings, black and galvanized, 
in all sizes. 

Ask your Jobber for C. T. Brand Wrought Pipe 

Canadian Tube and Steel Products Co., Ltd. 

Operating Canadian Tube and Iron Co., Limited 
Works at Lachine Canal, Montreal 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



DART Union Pipe Coupling 




Will not leak, loosen, rust, nor corrode 

Bronze to bronze is the secret. 

The heavy malleable iron pipe ends and 
nut help some but it is the snug-fitting 
non-corroding bronze to bronze that gives 
Dart Unions the necessary qualities to meet 
the sternest service conditions. 

The Dart — so easily connected — remains a 
permanent, unleakable union until taken 
Apart with a wrench. 

Your Jobber Sells Them. 



Manufactured by Dart Union Co., Limited, Toronto 




KERR VALVES 



• l 



111 



V 




The illustration here is of our genuine WEBER PATENT 
Bronze Gate Valve. 

All old timers remember it as the best made and best appear- 
ing gate made in Canada. 

It earned its reputation years ago, and still maintains it. It 
has stood the test of time. 

What better recommendation could one ask for a valve, than 
to meet all comers for 40 years. 

It has had its imitators, but the genuine Kerr Weber Gate 
leads the procession. 

Get out in front and use Kerr's Weber Gates. You will see 
the difference. 



No. 43— Screwed 



Ltd 



.V/V KERR ENGINE COMPANY 

LIMITED 

Va/ve Manufccciurers 



walkerville: 



ONTARIO 





Achievement 




"Art," someone has said, "is the expression of man's joy 
in his work." 

And it is equally true that the same smooth, sheer beauty 
of the New Design Vitro Tank is something that would 
come only from a plant where lies the pride of creative 
workmanship — that is imbued with the joy of doing. 

This beauty of design is, however, but a part of the whole; 
before the purely decorative comes utility. Strength, 
permanence, efficiency — these three unite with beauty 
in the Vitro, the best selling tank on the market. 



At Your Jobber's 



Gait Brass Company, Limited 

GALT ONTARIO 



TR 



NOTROUBLE 

TANK 







Plumber and Steam fitter of Canada 



Vol. XVII. 


PUBLICATION OFFICE, TORONTO, FEBRUARY 1, 1923 


No. 3 





"Emco" Red Metal Bibbs 



Impregnated 
Canvas and Rubber 
Packing Washer 



Anti- 
Splashing 
Spout 
Throws 

a 

Straight 
Stream 




Full Square 


Threads 


Insure Easy 


Turning 


of Stem and 


Long Life 



Hard Rubber 
Bibb Seat 



The outstanding; features of 
our full 16 oz. red metal 
Anti-Splash Bibb are shown 
in the above diagram. 

''Emco" Bibbs are attractive in design and uni- 
formly cast to assure long service. Each bibb 
must prove itself in rigid tests before it leaves our 
factory. 

Your jobber carries "Emco" plumbing supplies 
and fixtures. 



Full 1 o-inch 
1 apered 
1 hread 



Raised Seat 
gives full 

Viz -inch 
waterway 



EMPIRE BRASS MANUFACTURING CO., LTD 

LONDON and TORONTO, CANADA. 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 




smp Humidifiers 

A Fast Selling l^ew Line ^7nich 
Every JVferchant Should Handle. 
Place Your Order Promptly 

This new Humidifier (air moist- 
ener) is badly needed in Canadian 
homes. In homes where there is 
not enough moisture the furniture, 
floors and woodwork, wallpaper, 
bookbinding and pictures suffer. 
Pianos especially show the ravages 
of too-dry air in homes. Much 
disease, such as catarrh and ec- 
zema can be traced directly to the 
absence of moisture in the air. 

This new Humidifier certainly 
fills the job. Note the illustration. 
The water is poured into the tubu- 
lar part and also fills the narrow 
pan end. This thin pan end is in- 
serted between the coils, where it 
fits securely. It comes in direct 
contact with both sides of the rad- 
iator, thus giving the highest pos- 
sible evaporation of water. In 
cold weather one of these humidi- 
fiers will evaporate almost one 
quart of water a day. They should 
be in every room of every home for 
health's and economy's sake. 

The SMP Humidifier is made of 
Galvanized Iron and is finished in 
either Pearl Grey or White Japan. 
Sizes: No. 5, pan 18" x 5", supply 



Design Reg'd.. Patent Pending. 

The SMP Humidifier fits 
securely into the radiator; 
cannot spill or leak; well 
finished; inconspicuous. 

can 3" x 5". Total capacity V/± 
quarts. Fits smaller size radiators. 
Size No. 10, pan 18" x 9 1 /. ", supply 
can 3" x 91/0". Total capacity 2y 2 
quarts. Fits almost any standard 
radiator. 

There is profit for you in this 
new line, and splendid turnover, 
as each customer should purchase 
enough to outfit his entire home. 
We warmly endorse and recom- 
mend the new SMP Humidifier. 
Try them out in your own home 
first. Then you will see their sell- 
ing possibilities. 




hipments Made Promptly 



THE 



Sheet Metal ProductsC 



OF CANADA 
LIMITED 



MONTREAL 
EDMONTON 



TORONTO 
VANCOUVER 



WINNIPEG 
CALOARY 




February 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



1 




For Beauty of Design 



THE 



Pussyfoot 

Closet Tank 



Still shows the way — and the attractive 
appearance, wherever one is installed 
means added value to the property. 

There is also the satisfaction of knowing 
that the mechanical parts inside the 




Tank, all of which are manufactured 
from the highest grade material, are in 
keeping with the high standard of the 
Design. 

The New Valve 

Finds favor everywhere because of — 

Its extreme silence in operation. 
Its rapidity in filling the tank. 
Its simplicity of mechanism. 

A "Pussyfoot" outfit costs you no more although 
it is worth far more than the price it is sold at. 
Specify to your Jobber and insist on getting it. 



THE CANADA METAL COMPANY 

LIMITED 




Montreal Hamilton TORONTO Winnipeg Vancouver 



Take no chances — buy the adrertised lines. 



2 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



February 1, 1923 



They Follow th* 




No quicker or surer way to build up a 
plumbing business can be found than by 
selling disposal systems, with the Anthes 
Syphon, to rural dwellers. 



Why waste time talking bath tubs or lavatories to a 
man when by selling him a Sewage Disposal System 
all these other fixtures inevitably follow? 

Their sales and the job of their installation are mighty 
profitable transactions for you. 

The Anthes Syphon is the Heart 
of the Disposal System. 

Anthes Foundry 

Limited 

Toronto and Winnipeg 

Manufacturers of 

Cast Iron Soil Pipe and Fittings 




February 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



3 



ale of the Syphon 



Sell Disposal Systems First 

An Immediate Demand for Plumbing Fixtures Follow 



Discriminating Sanitary Engineers prefer "Anthes" 
soil pipe because its thirty years of manufacturing ex- 
perience have made it so dependable. 




Anthes soil pipe and fittings cost no more 
than the ordinary kind, yet each piece will 
give longer and more satisfactory service. 



4 Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February 1, 1923 




There's no magic about it 

Dollar bills don't grow on every bush, it's true. 
Neither do fat, profitable contracts. 

Your hard-headed sanitary engineer is skeptical 
about any such magic in the plumbing business — 
and rightly so. But — 

By having positive, current price information the 
progressive plumber can place every job, large and 
small, upon a methodical, profitable basis. 

There is no magic about Allpriser. It gives you 
thorough, right-up-to-the-minute Price Service. It 
makes estimating on jobs a pleasure instead of a 
labor of doubt and pencil chewing. You owe it to 
yourself to make Allpriser your ally from now on. 

Write today to 

K. B. ALLISON 

4 Irwin Ave. Toronto, Ont 



It pays to buy advertised lines. 



February 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



5 



Lay Your Plans Now 

for 

Spring a » d Summer Business 

Rural Development Number 
February 15th. 

Manufacturers of Plumbing and Heating Equipment — 
Canadian Sanitary Engineers want to know more about 
your product. 

1923 will see thousands of installations of plumbing and 
heating jobs in Canada's rural field. 

And — Canadian Sanitary Engineers will install them. 

They expect you to give them all the information you can 
about your product — information that will help them to put 
across sales. 

You can do this at small cost through the advertising col- 
umns of this paper — the only journal of its kind in Canada 
and read by 90% of the worth-while plumbing, heating and 
tinsmithing men of this country. 

Get vour message across in this and succeeding numbers of 
SANITARY ENGINEER, Canada's livest trade publi- 
cation. 

Don't Forget 

Forms close February 12th. Get your copy in NOW. 



Merchandise advertised here is O.K. 



February 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



7 



plendor Reigned 




Versailles, set a standard of luxurious living that has had no subsequent 
parallel. 

All the world knows of the forty personal servants who ministered to his 
every want; of his gallantries with the fair duchesses of France; of the 
great victories of his generals; of the Hall of Mirrors; — the gardens and 
fountains of Le Grand Trianon and of Fontainebleau ; of the charm and 
majesty of his manner — 

— BUT — We wonder if he would not have fired a dozen or two valets and 
become a little more human could he have stepped into a nice, modern 
bath tub each morning, turned the tap and mixed the hot and cold as he 
desired. 

Servants carried water in pails to the ornate bath tubs of Versailles, and, 
when the master's toilet was completed, baled the tub out with a sponge — 
it did not have even a drain plug. 

To-day the man of average means has a *££tatfdat*cf' bathroom; at his 
command are refinements of living of which Louis never dreamed. 



*££»t<il?ci&t*<f" Equipment in his window is the plumber's surest recommendation 

to the home builder of to-day. 

Standard cSamtar^ lDfeXo 

Limited 

General Office and Factory: Royce and Lansdowne Aves., Toronto, Ont. 



Calgary: 
354 11th Avenue West 

Winnipeg Showrooms: 

145 Market Street East 



Hamilton Store: 
26-28 Jackson Street West 

"Made in Canada 



99 



Montreal : 

New Birks Bldg. 

Vancouver: 

860 Gamble Street 



Only men convinced of the merit of their goods advertise them. 



s 



janitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February i, 1923 




Every 4 Months 




Supposing your jobbing, repair and retail business amounts to $15,000 
during the year. By the use of our pricing system you will receive at 
least 10% better prices. This means an extra profit of $1,500 or $500 
every 4 months, and the cost of our service is about 10 cents per day. 

HERE'S HOW 

We furnish you with a large loose leaf leather covered binder con- 
taining suggested selling prices on over 3,000 items in the Plumbing and 
Heating business. No matter how often cost prices change we keep your 
book changed up-to-date. We have four people working on this contin- 
uously. It has many other features which cannot be explained here. You 
certainly should try it out. 




The unknown brand is probably second prade — buy advertised lines. 



February 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



9 



Standard Sink Faucets 

FOR THE DAILY GRIND 




By STANDARD we mean a full weight Bibb, sturdily designed, ac- 
curately machined from prime brass castings, fine and tough and 
enduring. 

We mean a Bibb with precise threads that can be readily made up 
on a job, tight and snug and sightly. 

We mean a Bibb that has interior body thread and stem thread full 
and deep and in close contact, yet with handles that work freely and 
can be spun to a firm seat. 

We mean a Bibb having the best obtainable Composition Cap Nut 
packing and Seat Washer — a Bibb with handles corrugated on stems 

and surface counter sunk to let in handle screw — a Bibb of finely 
polished brass or heavy nickel plate surface — the whole a finished 
product. 

Install these real Bibbs — they will satisfy the plumber and get and 
keep trade. 

Ask Your Jobber 



The Wallaceburg Brass & Iron Mfg. Co., Limited 

WALLACEBURG, ONT. 

TORONTO: MONTREAL: WINNIPEG: 

Mr. L. N. Vanstone, 10 Wellington St. East G. M. Price, 10 Victoria St. Moncrieff & Endress, Ltd., Gait Bldg. 
Telephone: Main 2355 Telephone: Uptown 945 Telephone: A 9135 



Take no chances — buy the advertised lines. 



10 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February l, 1923 




{Made in Canada) 

The diaphragm damper regulator on the 
boiler must be of a size suitable to respond 
to the low pressure of four to eight ounces. 
The Dunham Damper Regulator insures 
absolute control. 




Boiler Pressure Control 



Eight ounces of pressure should be the maximum 
amount required on any Dunham Home Heating 
System; more often it is two or four ounces. De- 
sirability of effective damper control to guard 
against wastefulness of higher pressure is apparent. 

In the past the trouble in many cases of unsuc- 
cessful damper control rested on improper installa- 
tion. The hand damper should be installed in the 
smoke pipe to regulate the intensity of the draft to 
suit varying weather conditions. A balanced check 
damper, full size of the smoke pipe, must be instal- 
led in the smoke pipe, as this is the most effective 
device for checking the fire and thereby obtaining 
fuel economy. This should be controlled by the 
Dunham Damper Regulator. 

Full data on request. 

C. A. DUNHAM COMPANY, Limited 

Toronto - Ontario 

Manufacturers of a Popular Line of heating 
specialties 



Halifax, 



Vancouver, 
London : 



Winnipeg, Ottawa, Montreal, Calgary, 

18 St. Thomas Street, S.E. 1. 



Viking Radiotors 

A satisfactory heating system is only ob- 
tainable through perfect radiation. On 
your installation the boiler may be the 
finest that can be procured, and your 
mains and leads properly installed but the 
work will not be productive of best results 
unless the radiators perform their function 
in a proper manner. 

Viking radiators will complete the best 
possible job, one that you can be sure of 
satisfying your customers. 

Write us about your requirements. 




WARDEN KING, Limited, Montreal 



Branch Office 



136 Simcoe St., Toronto 



// it's worth ivhile — it's advertised. 



February 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



11 




USE 

TESTED Soil Pipe 

IT COSTS NO MORE AND YOU KNOW THE JOB IS RIGHT 

Manufactured by 

FORWELL FOUNDRY, LTD. 

KITCHENER, ONT. 




The Greatest Value Obtainable 
in Ceiling Plate 




TOP VIEW 
No. 10 



Our No. 10 Split Ceiling Plate 
can be attached to mains and 
risers at tile very last, and is 
not exposed during completion of 
a building on the floors, there- 
by making an attractive finish. 
Made in all sizes from 1-4 inch 
to 6 inches inclusive. 

The No. 10-A Narrow Flange 
Plate is a steel hinged plate 
flange 3-4 inch wide. Highly 
finished. Especially designed 
for twin connection "narrow." 
Made in sizes from 1-2 to 2 in- 
ches inclusive. Write for cata- 
logue showing our complete lines 
of specialties. 




GEM NO. 4 AUTOMATIC AIR VALVE 

The best brass possible to obtain is used and 
fereatly preserved .aga,ins.t corrosion from 
Plating acids because they are nickel plated 
before being assembled. This valve is simple 
to adjust and works automatically. 

The Beaton & Cad well Mfg. Co 

New Britain, Conn. 



Eastern Agents: J. R. Devereaux & Co 602 
New ■ Birta , Bid,. Montreal. Western Agents: 
A E Hinds & Co.. Chamber of Commerce 

^wTZ' A ! entS: * N. Vanstone', 
8 Wellington St. E., Toronto. 





Taking a Long Chance 

You don't take a chance when you handle 
Marvel Gas Water Heaters; you know — 
positively know — that in every test of 
service the Marvel will stand up. 

Your sale of a Marvel Heater nets you 
a juicy profit and you keep every cent 
of it; none of it is frittered away on 
return trips and adjustments. 

If it happens that you don't know about 
the Marvel, write to-day and we'll send 
you prices and full particulars. 

Sold only by or through Plumbers 

BASTIAN-M ORLEY, Ltd. 

125 Hanson Street, Toronto 






Are These The Opportunities You're Looking For? 

Fan Heating and Ventilating Engineering is the pinnacle of all other forms of heating, and 
of all branches of steam fitting and sheet metal work. It prepares you for: 

1. For Employers it enlarges their business opportunities 100%. 

2. Employees it raises to Foremanship of a large shop. 

3. Or as Designing Engineer of some large Heating Contractor, 
t. As an intelligent Salesman of Heating Appliances. 

5. As Chief Engineer with a Heating or Furnace Manufacturing Co. 

6. Later a Consulting Engineer to Architects and Building Contractors, etc. 

Which of These Are You Working for? 

Full Information Free. Select Your Course. 

[ ] Fan Heating and Ventilating Engineering. [ ] Sheet Metal Design and Pattern Drafting. 
[ ] Business Management, for office folks. 



ST. LOUIS TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 



4543 Clayton Avenue 



O. W. Kothe, Prin. 



St. Louis, Mo. 



// it's advertised in Sanitary Engineer you know it's all right. 



[2 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February t, 1923 



You can profitably use the "A-l" 
On 90% of your installations 




FULLY 90% of all Sanitary instal- 
lations call for the ordinary wash- 
down combination — simply because it 
is about the most inexpensive type of 
closet outfit available. 

But if your client exercises economy 
in choosing a closet combination of 
relatively low price, surely you can 
only serve his best interests by fur- 
nishing only the best his money can 
buy— the "A-l" Closet and "Belle- 
meade Junior" Tank. 



CANADIAN Solid Vitreous Ware 
stands pre-eminently superior as 
a truly sanitary material in the con- 
struction of both closet bowls and 
tanks. Its fine-grained, all-clay hard- 
burned vitreous body ensures a life- 
time of unchanging service while its 
lustrous white surface adds beauty to 
any toilet room and is as easily kept 
clean as a china plate. 

On the basis of present prices this 
combination affords a realization of 
value which cannot be challenged. 



CANADIAN POTTERIES 



LIMITED 



SAINT JOHNS 

qUEB&C 

Sales handled exclusively through recognized jobbers in Plumbing Supplies. 



It pays to buy advertised lines. 



F ebruary 1, vj2'A Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steam fitter 1:; 



SANITARY ENGINEER 

PLUMBER AND STEAM FITTER OF CANADA 



ESTABLISHED 1907 PUBLISHED TWICE MONTHLY 



Vol. XVII PUBLICATION OFFICE: TORONTO, FEBRUARY 1, 1923 No. 3 



CONTENTS 

Sanitary Science Lessens Disease • 15 

Accidents From Defective Appliances 16 

Plumber Shows Comfort of "Heating by Radiators" 17 

"Personal Contax With the Consumering Publik" 18 

Three Sets of Prospect Letters — How a Plumber is Selling 

Humidifiers 20 

Price Cutting is the Easiest Way 21 

Further Data on Sewage Disposal Systems — Questions on Hot 

Water Systems 22 

Farm Kitchen Water Supply 23 

The Use of Various Types of Valves 24 

Helps for February Advertising 25 

Editorial Comment 28 

The Mirrors of Selling Street 29 

Patterns for Octagonal Branch 31 

News Notes From Coast to Coast 32 



Market Conditions and Tendencies, Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg . 35-42 



The MacLean Publishing Company, Ltd. 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN, President. H. T. HUNTER, Vice-President. 

H. V. TYRRELL, General Manager. 

Publishers of Sanitary Engineer. Hardware and Metal, The Financial Post, MacLean's Magazine, 
Canadian Grocer, Dry Goods Review. Men's Wear Review, Canadian Printer and Publisher, 
Bookseller and Stationer. Canadian Machinery and Manufacturing News, Power House, Canadian 
Foundryman. Canadian Shipping and Marine Engineerig News, Canadian Automotive Trade 

Journal, Druggists' Weekly. 
Cable Address : Macpubco, Toronto : Atabek, London, Eng. 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter of Canada 

Published on the First and Fifteenth of Each Month 

Office of Publication: 143-153 University Avenue, Toronto, Canada. 

GEO. D. DAVIS. Manager. 
NORTON W. KINGSLAND. Advertising Manager. 

H. L. SOUTH ALL. Managing Editor. N. A. K EARNS. Contributing Editor. 

B. C. CULLEY, Associate Editor. O. W. KOTHE. Contributing Editor. 

W. C. DOVER. Associate Editor. EDWIN NEWSOME. Technical Editor. 



CHIEF OFFICES 

CANADA— Montreal. Southam Bldg.. 128 Bleury St.. Phone Plateau 946. Toronto. 143-153 University Ave, Tele- 
phone Adel. 5740 : Winnipeg, 810 Confederation Life Bldg., Telephone A. 3773. 

GREAT BRITAIN— London, The MacLean Company of Great Britain, Limited, 88 Fleet Street, E.C.. E. J. Dodd, 
Director. Telephone Central 12960. Cable Address: Atabek. London, England. 

UNITED STATES— New York L. H. Meyer. 1606 St. James Bldg.. 1133 Broadway. Telephone Watkins 58«9 : 
Boston, C. L. Morton, Room 734, Old South Building;;, Telephone Main 1024; Chicago, 405-6 Transportation 
Bldg., 608 So. Dearborn St.. Wabash 9430. 



SUBSCRIPTION PRICE— Canada, £2.00 a year; Great Britain. South Africa, and West Indies, 8s. 6d. a year 
United States. $2.50 a year; other countries. S3. 00 a year. Single copies, 10 cents. Invariably in advance. 



11 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February 1, 1923 





More Work and Better Work 

With 

Toledo and Jardine 
Pipe Threading Tools 



No. 2 Toledo Geared Thread- 
ing. Tool. Capacity 2%" to 
4". 



This tool threads pipe with less labor than others. It is so 
simple in construction that it is easier to do work right than 
n tl ii7 ^° ^° ^ wron £- It * s compact, light in weight, strong and 
One Man Does The Work durable, accurate and speedy. It costs no more than imita. 

Of Two tions and in one month's production it will more than pay 

for itself. 

Ask the man that uses them. 

Made in Canada — Leading Supply Houses will quote you 

A. B. Jardine & Co., Limited, Hespeler, Ontario 



Ontario, West of Brockville : 
W. H. Cunningham & Hill, 
269 Richmond St. W., Toronto. Ont. 



Brockville and East : 

J. R. Devereaux & Co., 
New Birks Bldg., Montreal, Que. 



Winnipeg: and West: 

Stanley Brock, Ltd., Winnipeg, Man., Cal- 
gary, Alta., Vancouver, B. C. 



SIGN AND MAIL THIS COUPON AND GET A CATALOGUE 



Name 



Address 



Sanitary Engineer 



QUALITY BIBB WASHERS 



Everything 
in 

Specialties 



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269 West Richmond St. 

TORONTO, ONT. 



Merchandise advertised here is O.K. 



Established 
1907 

Circulates 
Throughout 
Canada 




Plumber and Steam fitter of Canada 



Published 
First 
and 
Fifteenth 
of Month 



VOL. XVII. TORONTO, FEBRUARY 1, 1923 No. 3 



How Sanitary Science Lessens Disease 

Marked Decrease in Typhoid Fever in Exact Ratio as Dry Closets 
Reduced and Sewers Installed — Freezing of Sewers Was Aggra- 
vated by Permission to Do Away With House Traps on Plumbing 
Systems — Wooden Sewer in Use for 47 Years 

(Address to Manitoba Branch Sanitary Inspectors Ass'n. of Canada by James Smith, 
Chief Plumbing and Sewer Inspector). 



THE development of sanitary engineering is a most in- 
teresting study and before discussing the sewerage 
system of Winnipeg and particularly the maintenance 
of it, I would like to touch lightly on a historical review of 
sewers and drainage work and in doing so I would point out 
that sewers are not the outcome of modern civilization. In- 
vestigations in the realms of archeology have disclosed that 
sanitary science was not unknown in the older worlds and the 
water borne method of removal of sewage was practised in 
some of the palaces unearthed in recent years on the island of 
Crete. Latrines hewn out of stone with water flushing ar- 
rangements were found in these ancient buildings which date 
back to an earlier civilization than Rome or Athens, and are 
reliably computed to have existed about 2500 years B. C. The 
Assyrians also constructed large masonry sewers in their pal- 
aces built in the 8th and 9th centuries, B. C, but the most 
famous of ancient sewers is the "great sewer" of Rome, con- 
structed in the 7th century, B. C, and still in use after a lapse 
of over 2,500 years. A large tract of Rome could not have 
been inhabited without this sewer and one authority states: 
"To this gigantic work, admired even in the time of the mag- 
nificent Roman Empire, is undoubtedly owing the preservation 
of the Eternal City, which it has secured from the swamping 
that has befallen its neighboring plains." 

Neglected in Dark Ages 

It is interesting to reflect, judging from the intelligently 
planned drainage systems that have been disclosed, that those 
ancient engineers had a very clear conception of the necessity 
for paying great attention to this matter so vitally affecting 
public health. The art reached its highest ancient development 
in the time of the Roman Empire. The Romans in fact were 
the greatest engineers of antiquity and especially excelled 
in sanitary engineering. With the fall of the Roman Empire, 
sanitary engineering suffered the same retrogression which 
befell learning and science, and for a thousand years — through 
the middle of dark ages — it was entirely neglected with the 
result that terrible pestilences desolated Europe periodically. 

In Great Britain modern sanitary engineering may almost be 
said to have originated, yet as recently as 1815, laws were en- 
forced forbidding the discharge of faecal matter into the 
sewers. This law was repealed however, in 1847, and an ex- 
actly contrary act passed, making it compulsory to discharge 
faecal matter into the sewers. 

Wooden Sev/er 

Modern sanitary engineering, particularly with regard to 
sewage and drainage, has had its entire development since 
1850, and it is a short step, as we have been measuring time 
to-day, from 1850 to 1875, when the first sewer was laid in 



Winnipeg and extended ft'om south of Broadway to the C. P. 
R. tracks north of Higgins Ave., a distance of approximately 
IV2 miles. It reflects great credit on the pioneers of this 
city that they had the courage to launch into such a large 
scheme with a population of about 2,000 persons. This is a 
wooden barrel sewer and has a diameter of from 2 ft. 6 in. to 
3 ft. 6 in., and after being in use over 47 years I have no 
hesitation in saying that it is in better shape to-day and has 
cost less for maintenance than any trunk sewer since con- 
structed. 

Brick Sewers 

In 1883-4 the trunk sewers on Bannatyne Ave., Logan Ave., 
Assiniboine Ave. and Syndicate St. were constructed of brick, 
all of them have given good service and cost very little for 
maintenance. From that time steady progress was made in 
keeping with popular demand and financial ability, till in 
1893 General Ruttan reported that 35 miles of sewers had 
been constructed. 

Concrete Sewers 

In 1903 concrete began to be used for the construction of 
trunk and sub-trunk sewers and has since been used exclusive- 
ly till a few years ago. There are now approximately 262 
miles of sewers in the city, 44% miles of which are of con- 
crete construction and range from 2 ft. in. to 9 ft. in. in 
diameter. A very large proportion of repairs are on concrete 
sewers and it is only a question of time in my opinion till 
most of these concrete sewers will require to be rebuilt. In 
most of our concrete sewers disintegration of the concrete 
is to be found and in a number of cases the sewers have 
collapsed entirely for a distance of 10 to 20 feet. This con- 
dition is due to the presence of alkali salts in the soil being 
leeched out by the ground water and coming in contact with 
the concrete sewers. Our city chemist, after a great deal of 
experimentation, states that a concentration of 500 to 10,000 
parts per million will affect good concrete, but poor concrete 
may be affected by a lesser concentration. This condition is 
not peculiar to Winnipeg, but is found in all the prairie prov- 
inces and in the Middle States of America and attacks con- 
crete foundations or any other concrete underground. A re- 
search laboratory was established in Saskatoon last year 
to thoroughly investigate the matter and devise, if 
possible, some means of avoiding or counterbalancing 
the trouble. Meantime we are patching up our concrete sewers 
as well as possible to keep them in service till more definite 
information is available, and there has been at least one sub- 
trunk sewer constructed of segmental tile. No concrete 
sewers will be built meantime. 



16 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February i, 1923 



There are 684 underground flush tanks 
with an average capacity of 260 gal- 
lons. These are piaced at the end of 
laterals and are operated 2 or 3 times 
a week. In addition a hose gang is con- 
stantly flushing the sewers which are 
uncompleted or have no flush tanks. 
From 18 to 20 million gallons of water 
are used annually in this work. The 
sewer system of Winnipeg is well de- 
signed and very little trouble is ex- 
perienced from deposit in the sewers. In 
this respect the greatest trouble we 
have is due to the raising of the river 
level in the summer by the closing of 
"the St. Andrews Locks which causes 
our sewer outlets to be submerged, con- 
sequently when the locks are opened in 
the late fall and the river level is low- 
ered, considerable deposit is left in the 
trunk sewers close to the river, and this 
has to be flushed out. 

Climatic Troubles 

In a climate such as we have in Win- 
nipeg a great deal of care has to be ex- 
ercised in winter time to prevent freez- 
ing of the sewers and sewer connections, 
and it is a matter of wonderment to me 
that there is not a great deal more 
trouble from this source. At one time 
it was quite a common occurrence for 
sewers to freeze up, even at a depth of 
20 feet, due to indrafts at manholes and 
this was aggravated when permission 
was granted to permit of doing away 
with house traps on plumbing systems. 
However, by carefully noting year after 
year where the trouble was worst and 
covering the manholes in winter time 
our frost troubles have been almost en- 
tirely eliminated. The fact is, we can 
only permit a very limited amount of 
ventilation in our sewers during winter, 
a complete reversal of policy as prac- 
tised by cities in more temperate 
climates. 

Latest Problem 

Our most recent problem has been the 
return of the ground water to its form- 
er courses in the form of springs since 
the Shoal Lake Water System was in- 
augurated and the Well System abolish- 
ed about 2 years ago. There is consid- 
erable evidence that the ground water 
level has risen and recently at one point 
30 feet of an 18 in. tile pipe sewer col- 
lapsed. On excavating we found that 
springs had washed the clay from under 
the pipe, causing it to collapse. This 
pipe was replaced with a cast iron pipe 
resting on gravel and 6 lines of 4 in. 
weeping tile were laid alongside the 
iron pipe connected to a manhole. When 
the pipes were in place 4 of the 6 weep- 
ing tile lines were running full. 

I would draw your attention to the 
marked decrease in typhoid, fever in 
Winnipeg since 1905, almost in an exact 
ratio as dry closets were reduced and 
sewers and sanitary plumbing installed. 
In 1905 there were 6,339 dry closets in 
Winnipeg, and in the same year 1606 
cases of typhoid fever. Year after year 
as the dry closets were abolished the 



number of cases of typhoid fever was 
reduced till in 1920 and 1921 there were 
only 400 dry closets within our bound- 
aries and in each of these years there 
were only 17 cases of typhoid fever and 
not one death occurred from this cause. 
The incidence of typhoid fever is accept- 
ed by authorities as an index of the 
sanitary condition of a community, and 
judged on this basis, Winnipeg holds an 
enviable position. This condition, I have 



no hesitation in saying, is very largely 
due to the policy and unremitting ef- 
forts of the Health Department and it 
must be a very great source of pleasure 
and encouragement to you to know that 
your work has been so successful. The 
saving of life, the saving of sickness with 
all its inconvenience and mental anguish 
cannot be measured in terms of money. 
It is of incalcuable value to the com- 
munity and citizens of Winnipee. 



Accidents From Defective Appliances 

Great Danger From Insufficient Venting of Gas 
Appliances in the Form of Carbon Monoxide — 
Should Have Gas Feed Pipe Not Smaller Than 
%" for Four-Burner Range 

Written for Sanitary Engineer by G. J. H. 



Editor's Note: — After reading the 
article which appeared in a December 
issue of Sanitary Engineer with refer- 
ence to the asphyxiation of a young girl 
from carbon-monoxide, a Toronto sub- 
scriber who is cognizant of the details 
involved has written the following review 
of the situation, giving tangible sugges- 
tions for meeting the danger involved: — 

By G. H. 

CARBON monoxide is a very poi- 
sonous gas and is produced in com- 
bustion processes, where there is 
a deficiency of oxygen for completely 
burning the carbon in the gas to car- 
bon dioxides. A condition favorable for 
the production of carbon monoxide re- 
sults with gas range burners when the 
flame is insufficiently aerated by plac- 
ing the burner too close to the utensil. 
It is therefore very important to know 
exactly proper distance between burn- 
er and utensil without producing dan- 
gerous quantities of carbon monoxide. 
The air shutter adjustment of the burn- 
er which determines the characteristics 
of the flame has also much to do with 
securing perfect combustion. Carbon 
monoxide is a colorless, tasteless and 
odorless gas slightly lighter than air 
and burns with a pale blue flame; it is 
one of the combustible constituents of 
water gas, coal gas and producers' gas. 
The gas is very poisonous and it is due 
to this that so many deaths are caused 
annually by the accidental inhaling of 
artificial gases owing to the fact that 
carbon monoxide is colorless, odorless 
and tasteless and not easily detected by 
the ordinary senses. It can be present 
in very dangerous proportion before be- 
ing detected, which shows the import- 
ance of large gas feed pipe not less than 
% in. for 4 burner range to allow pro- 
per adjustment of each burner individu- 
ally when a range is at full capacity. 
Carbon monoxide is present in greater 
quantities in gas water heaters, caused 
by hot flame striking cold coils, etc., and 
owing to this seriousness of carbon 



monoxide poisoning it is important that 
every gas appliance have vent pipe from 
appliance to chimney which will carry 
away poisonous gases. 

Other causes of gas accidents are: — 
Defective and worn appliances and stop 
cocks and particularly the deadly rub- 
ber tube connection. This connection is 
a flexible tube which allows the average 
person to connect a gas appliance with- 
out the aid of an experienced mechanic 
and owing to the tubing being of poor 
quality in 90 per cent, of cases, an acci- 
dent results. In the city of Toronto 
each year a great many deaths occur 
from gas poisoning; during the year 1922 
a toll of 25 lives was the result of such 
accidents (not suicides) and with this in 
view it is important to prevent reoccur- 
rences from these conditions in the fu- 
aure, which should be done at once by 
the city of Toronto. In the city of 
Newark, N. J., under the supervision of 
"Mr. Ellsworth Francisco" a system of 
inspection is in force which regulates 
the gas appliances in rooming and lodg- 
ing houses, also the sale of only approv- 
ed rubber tubing which has been tested 
by inspection depai-tment. In this way 
a great many lives are saved, which cer- 
tainly repays for maintenance of in- 
spection dept. of this kind. It is to be 
hcped that the example set by Newark 
will be followed by others in the inter- 
ests of human life. 



Sandy, not feeling well, had consulted 
a doctor. 

Doctor — "Do you drink. Sandy?" 
Sandy — "Yes, sir." 

Doctor — "Well, you must give that 
up. D'you smoke?" 
Sandy — "Yes, sir.' 

Doctor — "You must give that up too." 

As Sandy went quickly through the 
office door, the doctor exclaimed: 

"You have not paid me for my ad- 
vice, Sandy." 

"I'm not taking it," replied Sandy. 



February 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer. Plumber and Steamfitter 



17 



Shows Comfort of "Heat by Radiators" 

How a Plumber Gets the Interest of Prospects for Hot Water 
Heating Systems Through the Medium of Window Displays 
Which Carry a Distinct Appeal — Details of Construction of 
Window Which Should Pull Many Prospects 



YOU HAVE a show window which is 
costing you money in rental and 
upkeep and as long as you have 
that window why not make it earn its 
way by at least presenting cleanliness 
and orderliness to the eye of the passer- 
by? 

Who knows but that an expenditure of 
$12.00 on this window may not cause 
just one prospect to pause long enough 
and then stop and think? 

Who knows but' that that one, just 
one, prospect may come in to you for 
information on the installation of a hot 
water heating job in his residence? In 
coming into enquire he is already largely 
sold on the idea; in coming to you he is 
also a large percentage sold to you as 
the installer of that job. 

Why knows but that one, only one, 
prospect may become a client and you 
secure business without price cutting- 
competition, the kind of competition that 
to-day makes you take business at 10 
per cent, and less when your overhead is 
20 per cent, and more? 

Show Comfort from Radiators 

This "Heat by Radiators" window can 
be made without regard for having, or 
making, any window background. The 
intention, in making this window, is to 
show the comfort, etc., from a radiatoi 
heat with a framework like a picture 
frame to cap it off. 

This picture frame should be set up, 
twenty inches if possible, from the floor 
of the window itself to the top side of 
lower frame member. For this purpose 
construct a platform of 1 in. lumber 
which shall be two feet wide, six feet ten 
inches long at front, and angled on each 
side so as to be four feet long at the 
back. Make sure that this platform is 
securely braced so that it will not topple 
over, although it is not necessary to nail 
to the floor of the window. 

The front frame itself is made out ol 
% in. by 4 in. dressed lumber and is five 
feet three inches high by seven feet long, 
mitred at each corner. In connection 
with this frame four angle plates may be 
secured at a hardware store for five 
cents each which will strengthen the 
nailing of your mitred corners. Slain 
this frame with two coats of mahogany 
combination stain and varnish. Two 
angle brackets screwed to the lower 
member of frame, one inch from top side 
of same, will allow this frame work to 
rest on the platform. 



For the back wall make a framework 
of % in. by 3 in. dressed lumber to mea- 
sure outside four feet wide by five feet 
high and on to this framework fasten 
the same size of beaverboard, tacking 
same along the edge of frame. 

The side walls are two feet six inches 
wide by five feet high of beaverboard 
and these do not need any framework 
as they can be nailed direct to the front 
and back members. 

Cut two pieces of beaverboard, the one 
for the floor being the same size as the 
platform and the one for the ceiling be- 
ing left one inch wider until finally fitted. 

The beaverboard on back wall, two 
side walls, and ceiling can be painted 
with some wall finish. I mention water 
paints because they are easily mixed and 
easily applied. 

If the two tones are used with say the 
darker tone four feet high on the walls 
and the lighter tone on the upper wall 



and also ceiling, then a %-in. half round 
strip can be stained mahogany and tack- 
ed around the walls, as shown in the pic- 
ture, with good effect. 

You may find certain adjustments to 
make in this layout. For instance, this 
display was made where the plate glass 
window was nine feet long and five feet 
six inches high. The window proper 
was over five feet deep and the front 
frame of this picture was set some two 
feet in from the plate glass. The pic- 
ture frame can be set to come a little 
above the top of the window, such dis- 
tance being judged by the distance pic- 
ture sets from window. 

Side walls are mentioned as being two 
feet six inches wide but in fitting these 
it may be necessary to cut an inch or so 
off the width. 

While it is necessary to make the dis- 
play secure yet this can be done without 
(Continued on page 30) 



The window which is described fully in this article is illustrated herewith, as 
used by F. A. Wiles, plumber, Toronto. Such a display drives home several 
important points in connection with hot Water heating. 




18 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



February 1, 1923 




"Personal Contax With 
the Consumering Publik 

(VWitfi apoloqics to Rinq W.Q-'ardner) 

Major LL.Anthes. 

Managing Director- Anthes Foundry Ltd. 



Tarraboome, Feb. 1, 1923 

Dear Friend Al:- 

THE weigh of trancegressers is hard. You 
reemember that pome I scent you at Xmas 
time. Well I infurred to you I was goin to 
spring it on Vilet. I sprang it all rite but it was 
like one of these here boomering sticks what the 
natuvs of Ostralia uses with the "come back." 
Instead of uttring some aprobriate commence on 
my poeticle instink Vilet handed me the midd- 
winter rasberry. 

"Theirs only 1 brite spot in it," she sez, "and 
thats were you say, 

The Xmas trees are all lit up, 
Even as you and me." 
I tumbled at onct as to wot was comin. You 
see me and Bill had an invite out to inspect the 
premices of a mutuel friend Noo Yeers Eve. Some- 
body had scent in a cupple of crox witch also had 
2 bee inspectd. I guess the inspectn. was prety 
thoro for wen me and Bill started for hoam it 
seamed just like walkin on a mary-go-round. 
Howsoever we was both feelin good and wen I 
feel good I cant keep from signin. An wen I sign 
I let lose like what I ust to do on the diamond — 
you know me Al. 

As Bill sez his feat was asleap we linqued arms 
and I ascorted Bill to his hoam. When we found 
the dore-bell I wrung it severeal timse thinkin 
praps the fokes was asleap. But they wasnt. 
Vilet opened the dore herself an wen she see us 
she give me a look like a meet-ax. She grabbed 
Bill bye the arm an pulled him in. I tride to carry 
it off with what Frenchies calls savwar fare. I 
razed my hat an maid a verry low bow saying at 
the same time "Happy Nooyere!" Vilet slamed 
the dore with a bang just as I was doin my bow. 
I was pretty neer fallin forward as I was doin the 



graceful and when the dore closed it caught me 
squair on the bean. Wen I come 2 I was sittin on 
the verandy flore wonderin wen the firewerks was 
goin to stop. So you can sea diplimatik relatns. 
between me an Vilet has bean somewat straigned. 

Well the abov is wot we mite call hoam-stuff, 
but the reel objek of this lettr. is to aprize you of 
hour efferts to get noo bizness. I bean readin sum 
of theze sassy articles on "How to Sell the Werld," 
an so I determined to sea if I cldn't pull off some- 
thin reel snappie. 

1 of the artikls. was strong for what is called 
"Persional Contax With Consumeing Publik." It 
tolde how to start a maling list and lettin all the 
peeple in the town and serrounding distrix no that 
your in bizness and just bustin to do em a good 
tern. I didint say nothin to nobody abt. it, but 
werked it all out miself untill I was reddy to spring 
the trap. I wanted to let Bill an Vilet no that I 
dident go to sleap like the bares an suck my toze 
all winter. Hears the letter i fraimed up : — 

Deer Sir & Maddam — Praps you dont no that 
weave got the swelest plumbing showroom in this 
part of Ontario. We invite you to come round 
and give us a look over. If you never had no 
plumbing in youre hoam you dont no wat hoam 
comferts is. Whare youre convenyiances such as 
water supplie and waste and etc. are on the out- 
side you never no wat it is until you have it on the 
inside. Wots the cents of havin to dress up fer 
the outside wen it can all be done on the inside? 
I ask you this question to put to youreself. Young 
ladies is in the habit of wareing pumps these days. 
If she wants water or etc. in the winter time she 
has to go out to the pump or the etc. in her pumps. 

Wots the result? Wet feat! Wot does wet 
feat leed to? To inflewenzy — to pheumonia and 
verry verry offten to dethe ! 

Think ov it! Pumps — wet feat — pheumonia — 
dethe! 



February 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



19 



Doze it not make 1 stop to shuder? I asks you. 

And all can bee pervented by inside plumbing. 

If praps you have got in plumbing but the taps 
leek from old aige, and the bath is all outa shaip 
by being sat in so much on a|c of being only tinned 
coppar, and the seet is cracked and pinches you 
wen you sit down on a|c of being warped and splitt 
dont you think it is time for a chainge just the 
same as a plitical party wat has bin in offis 2 long? 

If you live in the country let us show you our 
desine of skeptic tanks and watter presher sistems. 
We no we can intrist you & maik a visit to our 
shop a plesher and profit to awl. 

Come on in and give us the onct over. 

Yours truely 

Emporium Plumbing & Heating Co. 

Now I leeve it to you Al if that letter aint full 
ov meet as they say abt. the kokonut. 

I feltt purty good over it and I put in xtry panes 
to get my spellin rite. I no it aint perfeck by no 
meens but I think it has a kik into it. 

Well I sprang it 
on Bill & Vilet 1 
nite & I will say 
for bothe of them 
they lissend atten- 
tat and siaid they 
was possybilities 
into it. But they 
dident show no 
fitts of rapchur so 
you eld. notis. 

"Who doo you 
purppos sendin the 
letter out to?" ast 
Vilet cawsully. 

"Everybody in 
the distrik," I sez 
rite out. 

"A lotta peeple 
hearaboutz has 
plumbing in al- 
reddy has they 
not?" she sez. 

"Shure they has," 
I retortured. 

"Then why tell 
them abt. outside 
disscomferts?" 

"You dont on- 
derstand," I sez, 
"that letter is a 



genral apeel to evveryboddy." 

"I cann sea that," sez Vilet without turnin a 
hare, "but why not make it spesifick?" 

"Make it wot," I sez, thinkin of horse medycine. 

"Specifick," she reepeated. "That is subdyvide' 
yer prospecks." 

"You must think weer sellin reel ostate," I sez. 

"O know Ime not," she came back with sang 
fraud, (witch is French you no for nonchallous) . 
"You can subdyvide jer perspectif customers jest 
the saim as you subdyvide reel ostate." 

"You meen cutt em up befoar you sell em?" I 
enquired sort ov purplexed. "I aint neether a 
buttcher or a cutt-up," I sez, thinkin their was a 
call for a smart retorte. 

" I aint so shure you aint a cutt-up," sez Vilet 
soopersiliously. "If you lissen He explane." 

"Ime all earze," I sez sittin back. 

"I kin sea that," snipped back Vilet lookin at 
the sidze of my hed, so I shutt up and give her 
the flore. 

"Wat I meen by subdividen yer prospex," she 
continyered, "is formeing them into groops. Weeve 

£?ot reckerds of 
evry 1 round hear 
hooze got in 
plumbing, and wee 
no thoze wat has in 
noo jobs and them 
wat has old ones 
wat shld. be over- 
halled. The rest 
aint got enny 
plumming & etc. 
atall. Now my 
ideer is to maik 
groops of them 
that has & that 
hasnt, also them 
that nead a 
chainge and rite 
a speshul letter 2 
each group. Ree- 
member I aint 
nockin yer skeem, 
I think its a good 
1, but I bleeve the 
reesultz wd. bee 
better if you adop- 
tid the groop sis- 
tem. 

"I dont no but 
wat your rite," I 
cummented, seein 

(Cont. on page 20) 




"When I come 2 I Was sittin on the verandy flore wonderm Wen the 
fireworks Was goin to stop." 



20 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



February 1, 11*23 



Three Sets of Prospect Letters Brought 

Good Returns to Maritime Contractor 

During Fall L. A. Haley Outlines Prospects in the 
District and Follows Them Up Vigorously During 
Winter Months — Only Way to Keep Up Activity 
in Cold Weather, He Says 



<(TF A PLUMBING contractor wants 
I to keep busy all through the win- 
ter he must get out and get," says 
L. A. Haley, one of the well-known 
plumbing contractors of the New Bruns- 
wick and Maine border section. 

"During the late fall," continued Mr. 
Haley, "I list out all the prospects in 
my vicinity. I get the names of people 
who intend to build houses in the spring- 
as well as those who might decide to in- 
stall sanitary plumbing in their homes 
during the winter, thinking the qost 
would be less than at any other time. 
I divide the names into three classes — 
likely, unlikely and doubtful. To the 
likely class I start to send direct mail 
advertising such as booklets and letters. 
The letters are all written individually 
as, although the circular letters may be 
all right for another business, they are 
not the right idea for the plumbing- 
business. 

"With the unlikely list I also send 
out individual letters as the first assault. 
Afterward I follow up with a personal 
canvass. If the person lets me look 
over the ground I give him an estimate 
of what the job will cost. A week or so 
after I give the estimate, I visit the- per- 



TAKING advantage of opportuni- 
ties for the sale of humidifiers and 
thus increasing the relative 
amount of trade at this season of the 
year, has been one of the methods 
adopted by various sanitary engineers. 
In discussing this matte-r with Sanitary 
Engineer, Messrs. Band & Cole, of Ot- 
tawa, Ont., pointed out that they have 
included humidifiers in their recent win- 
dow displays, and by giving publicity of 
the right- kind to these products public 
interest is not only aroused therein, but 
gratifying trade results have been 
achieved. 

"The average person today is not ac- 
quainted with what humidity means," 
said one plumber to Sanitary Engineer. 
The reason why he was featuring these 
products, he said, was that "the public 
look to the plumbers for information on 
sanitary and heating equipment and not 
only as to what kind of equipment is 
needed, but the reasons why they should 
install it. That is what we have been 



son and keep him or her interested in the 
subject. If the person is a difficult one 
to convince I let time take its course 
but just the same I keep active and in 
touch with conditions. 

"With the doubtful class I send the in- 
dividual letter. Then I visit the quarry 
and give him or her (I hope it's a him) a 
heart to heart talk. Perhaps he does not 
like me personally. You know there 
are people with whom I was brought up 
who do not seem to like me and would 
like to give their business to strangers. 
However, I keep after these people and 
show them where I can do the work at 
less cost than any other contractor, and 
in addition I offer to give these people 
each written guarantees that the work 
will be satisfactory or if not I will make 
it so, without further expense to the 
customers. 

"I have found that in order to get 
business it is necessary to get out after 
it. I would be a long while sitting in 
my office before enough business would 
come drifting in to keep me busy through 
the winter or summer either. I tried the 
waiting stuff and then I got busy, and I 
got results." 



trying to do through our window dis- 
plays, retail advertising and show-card 
suggestions. It is our opinion," he con- 
tinued, "that failure on the part of the 
sanitary and heating engineers to pro- 
vide the public with the information de- 
sired along these lines will naturally 
place him in a minority position in their 
estimation. They will then turn else- 
where to have their curiosity satisfied 
or to s,eek this knowledge of matters 
pertaining to their personal welfare." • 

Some samples of their window cards 
were then pointed out. One of them 
read as follows: 

"Warm air heating furnaces have their 
water pans. What about the lrumidity 
of your steam or hot water boilers ? We 
have the humidifier, which is ap- 

plicable to either steam or hot wa f er 
radiators." 

Another one reads, "Consider the bene- 
fit derived by the whole family through 
the installation of the right kind of hu-. 
midifiers on your radiators. These can 



be installed throughout the home at a 
very moderate cost. They will keep the 
air moist, and thus protect furniture 
from warping and splitting. This re- 
quired moisture in the air will also keep 
the wall-paper from peeling. Certain 
medical authorities advocate the use of 
humidifiers as a guard against, sore 
throats." 

Other advertising matter sent out by 
this plumber reads as follows: "From 
a health viewpoint alone you should not 
hesitate to install humidifiers in your 
home. They keep you healthy, they pro- 
tect your furniture through keeping the 
air moist. They also aid distinctly in 
preserving good health." 



"PERSONAL CONTAX WITH THE 
CONSUMERING PUBLIK" 

(Continued from page 19) 

the lite of her argyment. 

"Then wat abt. heatin," she sez, "I 
dont sea nothin hear abt it." 

I confest I hed kleen fergot about 
mechinon heatin. 

"Furthramoar, why not run a few adds 
in the lokel paiper at the saim time usin 
some of thoze klassic kutz the annamel 
terms sez theyle lend. Also put in the 
letters some of thoze their foulders with 
kutz of moddern bathrooms?" 

I seen that Vilet hed bean thinkin 
along the saim lions as I had onlie she 
had thunk deaper. 

"1st rait," I sez in admuration. and 
Bill nodded ascent. 

So we went to it, goin into kawkus so 
to speek like the cab-nut minnisters do. 
it tuk a litle time to get our lissts ail in 
shaip and our hole campane doaped out 
but we finely arrivd. 

We drest the windy up shown the 
things we was writin to the peeple abt, 
got our advertizen out, and then shott 
out the letters & foulders, follered up 
by more advertizin. It jarred the bank 
balance a bit but the publick also bit & 
they bit harder that the- bank balance 
was bit and Vilet said the xpenditure 
was a prophetable invesstment. 

I no that wee never was so bizzy be- 
foar. The peepul come like as if it was 
a Revivle Meating & I begin to undder- 
stand wat bizness revivle ment. 

Weer still sufferin from the affects of 
that campane but its the kind of sufferin 
that maiks you feal good. We had to 
put on severial noo jernymen and evry- 
boddy 7 is doggtirde at nite. But weer 
happie! 

Vilet has been reel kind 2 me re-esently 
& Ime feelin bettr in consekence. 

Its bedtimme & Ime awl inn so He tye 
the cann on this apissal rite hear. 
Yourse as ever, 
Jerry 



Free Medical Advice. — "Don't buy 
thermometers in the summer — they are 
lower in winter."— The Journal of the 

American Medical Association. 



How a Plumber is Selling Humidifiers 

Ottawa Plumbing Firm Include Humidifiers in 
Window Displays and Encourage Customers to 
Look to Them for Advice on Ventilating Questions 



February 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND StEAMFITTER 



2: 



Price Cutting Easier than Selling 

But Morale of Plumbing Business Has Been Affected by Con- 
tinuous Price Cutting— An Epidemic of Spinelessology — Bids on 
a Job Range From $245 to $322.50 

(Written for Sanitary Engineer by Kenneth B. Allison) 



MISERY loves company. By pub- 
lic acclaim are we, in the plumb- 
ing business, finding out what a 
lot of us felt, namely, that we have com- 
pany in the glorious all-the-year round 
pastime of "beheading the prophet" — 
pardon me, "profit." 

Some time before an article entitled 
"Wholesalers Seeking to End Tobacco 
War" appeared in a Toronto paper. 
I had noticed that there was a price- 
war on in the cigar business of 
Toronto. I found that a package of 
twenty of a well-known cigarette costs 
the dealer, when sales tax is added, 
thirty-one and a half cents and his sell- 
ing price was thirty-five cents. 

Yet, price cutting has reduced the 
selling price today to as low a figure as 
twenty-seven cents. 




Passing that little extra discount 
along gives less volume of busi- 
ness, a larger percentage of over- 
head and this eats up the profit. 

At the beginning of a new year, when 
folks have been extending the Season's 
Greetings with an at-peace-with-the- 
world disposition, it is perhaps bad taste 
to start stirring up trouble and suggest- 
ing all sorts of calamities as sure to 
happen if some of our most flagrant 
sins, either of commission or omission, 
are not rectified. 

May, therefore, the abuse I give here 
be taken in the spirit in which it is given, 
as being for the common good and as 
not having been the result of personal 
jealousy. Fact is, jealousy could not 
have prompted this article because I 
trust I will never have to be reduced in 
the ranks sufficiently that I will find it 
necessary to steal, especially from 
myself. 

The best information which I have 
gives me the average preferential, or 
margin, enjoyed by the wholesale dis- 
tributor of plumbing material as 18.6%. 

Writers of various articles have shown 
that all percentages are reckoned as a 



part of, or as in relation to, the total 
percentage of one hundred. 

Therefore the wholesaler, on an aver- 
age, pays 81.4% for his goods (100% 
minus 18.6%) and if an article costs the 
wholesaler $100 then that figure is 81.4% 
of his selling price if said selling price 
is to conform with the preferential dis- 
count he enjoys. By dividing this per- 
centage into the cost price we find this 
selling price to be $122.85. If you are 
in doubt as to the correctness of this 
answer, then take 18.6% of $122.85 and 
you obtain an answer of $22.85 which 
deducted from the $122.85, leaves us with 
our original cost of $100. 

Now the overhead expenses of some 
dozen wholesale houses show those ex- 
penses to run as high as 26%% of the 
selling price and averaged up show 17%. 

Business is, we will say, dull, and we 
as wholesalers, want more volume or, 
carrying the thought to the other ex- 
treme, business is now good and we want 
to get ours while the getting is good. 
In any case we find that price cutting, in 
place of salesmanship, seems to be the 
easier road to the increased volume- so 
we will see how much we can cut the 
prices from the preferential so that we 
may pass all the profit along while at 
the same time making our way — over- 
head expenses. 

By the method of figuring as was 
given above we find that on every ar- 
ticle having a net cost of $100 we should 
receive $121.21 so that we may just clear 
expenses. 

Some of the readers of this paper who 
are trade operators will probably think 
just about now that these figures are 
so close that Allison is either kidding 
the reader or himself. 

I will defy anyone to make any radi- 
cal changes in my figures, because they 
are plain facts. 

Loss of 93 Cents On $100 Worth 

Do you in the trade realize that the 
giving of as small a premium as 2% by 
the wholesaler to you for your business 
causes a loss of ninety-three cents on the 
cost to the wholesaler of each one hun- 
dred dollars' worth of goods; that you 
are actually paying ninety-three cents 
less for the goods than their cost to the 
wholesaler who has just the average 
overhead of 17%% ? 

Do you in the trade realize that an 
extra 5% to you means an extra 5% to 
a whole lot of other operators and per- 
haps an extra 7%% to them so that you 
are the difference — say 2%% — worse off 
by price cutting? 



Do you in the trade realize that in 
passing that little extra on-the-side dis- 
count along, as you invariably do, you 
do a lesser volume of business, have a 
larger percentage of overhead, and have 
a lesser percentage of profit? 

If you only, as an operator, ob- 
tain that little extra to yourself why 
you could shade the other fellow's bid 
a little, make a little extra out, of the 
extra yourself, gather in a lot of busi- 
ness and go ahead like a house on fire, 
but unfortunately the little extra is not 
a secret or a special privilege because 
you find your competitor is beating you 
to it with a better price and you are 
seized with a fear — no, just a very, very 




Price cutting keeps the plumber 
everlastingly on the treadmill 

faint suspicion that inadvertently your 
competitor has found a place to buy just 
a little cheaper than you. 

If the finding of that place, or that 
way, would put you all back on a com- 
mon buying level there might still be 
a chance, but no, it becomes a now-you- 
see-it now-you-don't game like the shell 
game. You — reading this article right 
now and being an operator in this busi- 
ness, YOU know you are not making the 
progress you should. 

Nice to Stop it at the Door of Wholesaler 

We have started this argument right 
at the door of the wholesaler. Wouldn't 
it be real nice if we could 9top it right 
there ? Wouldn't it be nice if we could 
think of this trouble as having been suc- 
cessfully localized, that if anything the 
patient, our good old friend the plumb- 
ing industry, was resting much easier 
now, and that there was no danger of 
the disease spreading and our having an 
epidemic — spinelessology ? 

But let us on and have the rest of it 
over with, and see how far the price- 
cutting bug has gone into the system of 
the operating plumber. 

(Continued in next issue) 



22 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February l, 1923 



Questions and Answers Regarding 
Plumbing and Heating Practice 



Further Information Re Sewage 
Disposal System 



Editor Sanitary Engineer: 

I have been a reader of your "Sanitary 
Engineer" for some years. 

I feel I must congratulate you on the 
excellent answer to "New Subscriber's" 
problem of sewage disposal } appearing in 
the Dec. 1st issue. This answer was 
in itself worth the whole yearly sub- 
scription price. 

To make- the answer complete to my- 
self, I would like to ask one question. 

How would you make installation ac- 
cording to Fig. 2 sketch in heavy clay 
soil where there is not any natural grade 
within the area in which the installation 
must be made? 

— H. W. R. Toronto. 



of six inches. Next place the pipe on 
to the cinders and fill over the top and 
sides with more cinders until the pipes 
are covered over about 2 inches and not 
more than 3 inches. 

Dig the trenches as shown in sketch, 
Fig. 1 herewith, and then cover the cin- 
ders with a mixture of sandy soil and 
clay. This is, to our knowledge, the only 
way to make a success of a field tile area 
when the ground is clayey. The money 
spent will be worth while because, as a 
matter of fact, sand mixed with the clay 
will make good growing land, otherwise 
the clay is almost useless for gardening 
or even for a lawn. 

The sodding of this area will also 



feet of radiation. Radiators are usually 
located at each end of the house. Our 
method requires the running of four 
lines of piping to each end of the boiler 
which, on this type of building, is usually 
located about 12 feet from the front in 
the basement. 

It has often occurred to me that the 
running of four lines of piping with the 
large labor, pipe and fitting costs for 
this type of building was out of propor- 
tion, making the installation appear too 
costly to the average builder of this 
type of residence. 

The fact that so many in the trade are 
attempting to solve this question by in- 
stalling many of the "57 varieties" of 
two-pipe jobs we see every day, I believe 
it would prove interesting to the major- 
ity of your readers if you could answer 
this question through the pages of the 



Qood Qra55 Qodt 



loon? 

( if Pi-oeurob/e .) 



Sand & C/ay M/xed 





dnderS' 
^ Inch Field T/le 



Railway Cinders 

9 Inch Field Ti/e 



4 Inch Field Tiie 

•Showing JJou/ Disposai 3ed <S/iou/d &e Prepared l^/fy&n Ground /s Meai/y C/oy . 
— V ( \ t K \ V V ■ 



NOTE. — This subscriber also asks 
several questions re hot water heating 
systems, requiring some special draw- 
ings. These latter questions will be 
answered in their regular order. (See 
below). — Editor. 

Referring to the query in connection 
with disposal bed in clay ground, etc., 
the following is our solution to the 
problem: 

In the first place, when the amount of 
lineal field tile has been decided upon, 
the area of ground must be measured 
and the tile pipe laid out in such a way 
as to have the open jointed laterals as 
far apart as the ground available will 
permit. This may mean that a greater 
number of glazed sewer pipes will have 
to be furnished but, nevertheless, they 
are absolutely necessary. 

Next, the trenches must be dug at 
least six inches deeper than usual, or not 
less than 24 inches deep. Then fill into 
trench good railway cinders to a depth 



make a big improvement in the sewage 
disposal system. One thing more before 
concluding. When a disposal system of 
piping has to be laid in such ground as 
is referred to by H. W. R., it is always 
well to provide 10 to 15 per cent, more 
4-inch field tile pipe, if the area of the 
ground available will permit. 

—Technical Editor. 

H. W. R. also writes as follows re- 
garding 

Hot Water Systems 

In my daily work I find some very 
queer attempts to install what I under- 
stand as the circuit system of hot water 
heating. We are still installing the 
regular system of piping for hot water 
heating, that is, with a separate system 
of piping for the ground floor and for 
the upper floors. 

Our work 'is chiefly on medium-sized 
residences having from 350 to 550 square 



"Sanitary Engineer," for which I could 
supply a plan. 

The following remarks will, to some 
extent, serve as an introduction to what 
could develop into a number of valuable 
discussions: 

For example, the intricate system of 
piping that goes to make up a gravity 
hot water heating system is largely due 
to the fact that piping in residences 
must be placed out of sight. This re- 
quires separate risers and mains for 
each floor and oftentimes even for an 
individual radiator. 

Another reason, and there are many, 
is that very few heating contractors 
give vent to their imagination — too 
many rely upon the manufacturer of 
boilers and radiators to lay out a job. 
And often, too, the architect also gets 
his heating plans drawn by the above- 
mentioned manufacturers. This state of 
affairs should be viewed as pathetic by 
every man engaged in the business and 



February 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND StEAMFITTER 



23 



until we have men who begin to study 
for themselves the underlying principles 
in heating, little true progress can be 
made. 

And if the cost of installing hot water 
heating systems or steam systems must 
come down, it will only be by the rank 
and file of heating contractors becoming 
masters of the situation and by fitting 
themselves to pian and lay out all their 
jobs in their own offices. 

Then there is another reason. How 
long, oh how long are we going to hold 
to open tank hot water gravity jobs? 
How long are we going to refrain from 
acknowledging the efficiency of pressure, 
or closed hot water heating systems? 

The answer: — Just so long as we are 
dependent upon others to think for us. 
That is about the only answer. 

Hot water heating is where it was in 
the days of Sir Isaac Newton. No pro- 
gress in the rank and file of jobs. Why 
not adopt closed systems with smaller 
pipes and smaller amount of radiation? 



Why not adopt a small circulator, a 
mechanical means to assist circulation ? 
Why use those light-gauge expansion 
tanks that are no doubt cheap but re- 
quire replacing? Why not sell a heat- 
ing system on its value in service in- 
stead of upon the basis of first cost? 

Why not adopt a Vento system in a 
house and install warm air and cold 
air ducts in the walls? This would at 
least furnish some variety. And then 
last but not by any means least, why 
not adopt low-pressure steam for resi- 
dences? Almost any departure from 
the present sameness in hot water heat- 
ing systems would be welcome. And 
now, in conclusion, we would call our 
readers' attention to a new series of 
articles which will appear in an early 
issue. This series will begin with the 
methods adopted by men in the pre- 
historic age to the present, not only 
methods adopted in this country but in 
others as well. 

— Technical Editor. 



Farm Kitchen Water Supply 



ONE of our readers wishes to know 
how hot and cold water can be 
procured at the tap in a farm 
home, using one pump as already used 
at a sink. 

An ordinary cast iron sink is in use, 
and the waste at present is being dis- 
charged into a cesspool some distance 
from the house. A large soft water 
system is situated in the basement and a 
good quantity of soft water is available. 

The rural resident hopes to install a 
pneumatic water system soon as well as 
a complete plumbing system. One reason 
for delay is that he is likely to be able to 
procure hydro-electric service at no far 



distant date, but if some way can be 
found to fit up a modern kitchen now, 
a new kitchen will be built, and a mod- 
ern sink installed now, with a new 
kitchen range. 

The Problem Solved 

The writer was asked this same ques- 
tion some months ago by the wife of a 
farmer and answered by making a draw- 
ing similar to the accompan ying illus- 
tration. The pump is a force and lift 
type. It has a union nozzle, and so, 
can be connected to a system of pipes. 

No piping used in a rural home should 
be less than % inch and if this size is 



used the work of pumping is not harder 
than before the piping was installed. The 
whole system is laid out in the ordinary 
way, the pump connected to the pipe that 
would be f itted to the pressure supply. 

A regulation range boiler and' water 
front is connected up as shown, and it' 
will be noted that when the pump is op- 
erated, and either the hot or cold water 
tap is opened, water will flow. Simply 
because if the cold water tap is opened 
and the pump is operated, cold water 
will not flow into the range boiler, but 
will simply pass up through the pipe and 
down to the cold water tap. On the other 
hand, if the hot water tap is opened, and 
the pump is operated, the cold water will 
be forced into the range boiler, through 
the tube to the bottom of boiler, thus 
forcing the hot water out at the top of 
the boiler and through the hot water tap, 
exactly in the same manner as if the 
range boiler were connected to a city 
water service, or pneumatic water sup- 
ply system, with the slight addition of a 
safety valve as shown. 

To carry water up to a bathroom at a 
later date, two tees could be fitted to the 
piping at the ceiling near to the top of 
the range boiler. These tees could be 
plugged, and then no piping need be 
disconnected to make the necessaary ad- 
ditions. 

This is a very simple way to overcome 
the use of the ordinary open tank at the 
back or end of a range, used as a rule 
on kitchen ranges in rural homes, and 
not only so, but by using a water front 
and range boiler, at least 30 gallons of 
hot water would be available at all times. 

Furthermore, if the owner of the 
house wishes to procure hot water in 
summer time, and not put a fire in the 
kitchen range, a gasoline water heater 
could be fitted to the range boiler in the 
(Continued on page 30) 



7 



E 



a 




Show/no J/our tfonye &oifer Can Be Fitted dp M ty/chen Of 
Farm Or tfuro/ Mome 3y Connte/ino Sma// Force /Ina 1 lift 
Purn p. find pipe* To k/o/er Front /n /fitc/ien tfanpe. Furnishing 
/lot find Cold hfoter /It 5m\- Souina/Vany S/eps for J/eusewfe . 
If/llla/er Oafe /? pneumatic WoterSystem /s/nsta//eJ 
Sim/b/y Connect This pipe 7o Supply pipe teadino from 
Pneumol/c 7an4 In Scsemerrt 
<J*Lv - 3/4 £ Pi(j« Amd Firrmos Mu.t Be Useo. 

•y+ZncA Boi/er 7c/ee> 

Force And l-'ff r r> am J p 



Suction P/fie To fitter 
^ C/sfern 0r P/e//. 



/{//cherr f7oor 




24 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February 1, 1923 



The Use of Various Types of Valves 

Practical Data on Globe, Angle, Cross, Check and Gate Valves 
— Check Valves Looked Upon With Suspicion by Average En- 
gineer and it is Frequently Badly Bruised — Still Some Globe 
Valves Connected at Wrong End 

(By Herbert Smith, Ass't. Superintendent Empire Brass Mfg. Co., Ltd., London, Ont.) 



PRACTICAL service requirements 
have developed three general clas- 
ses of types of valves — First: — 
globe, angle and cross valves. — Second, 
check valves — and third, gate valves. In 
addition there are numerous types for 
special service, much as blow-off, back 
pressure, safety, hose, whistle, etc., but 
in the three classes mentioned may be 
grouped by far the larger majority of 
valves. Furthermore, the general de- 
signs of these three classes are now 
well standardized. 

Valves must be not only strong enough 
and heavy enough to withstand maxi- 
mum pressure to which they may be 
subjected, but in addition they must be 
capable of withstanding varying pres- 
sures and temperatures, strains of ex- 
pansion and contraction, weight of pip- 
ing, stresses incidental to settling, and 
the corrosive and cutting action of 
steam, gas or fluids. They must be 
standard — that is, all valves for simi- 
lar service must as identical as is prac- 
tically possible and each component part 
should be interchangeable. 

The function of a valve is to control, 
regulate or change the natural course 
and action of the medium carried by the 
piping, container, connection of fixture 
to or in which the valve is attached. 

A Grave Responsibility 

The establishment engaging in the 
manufacture of valves assumes in these 
days of high steam pressures, a grave 
responsibility. Valuable lives and pro- 
perty must be safeguarded by his pro- 
duct, and yet the selection of valves is 
too often governed by their initial cost. 

Suitable materials in combination with 
correct design, and this combination only 
can successfully give the service de- 
manded by the user. 

In all valves — and Globe valves in 
particular — on account of the stiffening 
of the valve seat bridge when the valve 
is subjected to changes of temperature, 
a certain warping of the valve seat is 
almost sure to occur. This, the seat, 
being the vital spot of a valve and the 
point of the valve which makes a suc- 
cess or failure of it, has led all makers 
of valves to try by various means to 
overcome the almost impossible condi- 
tions to be contended with. Where it is 
permissible to use it, nothing has met 
these conditions, so far, more success- 
fully than a resilient disc — that is, one 
that would conform to any uneven sur- 



faces on the seat face caused 
by warping of the seat, scored 
faces, etc. The most suitable ma- 
terials used for this purpose are rub- 
ber compounded with graphite, or oxide 
of iron and asbestos, and then vulcaniz- 
ed. But up to now no resilient discs, to 
my knowledge, have been developed that 
will stand up against the action of su- 
per-heated steam, and for gasoline this 
disc is not to be recommended, as the 
gasoline disintegrates the rubber from 
the compound and entirely destroys the 
disc. 

Admitting the fact that the rubber 
disc is to be most highly recommended 
as the most suitable means of overcom- 
ing most of the difficulties of success- 
fully keeping a valve tight, we are af- 
fected by limitations of the use of same, 
and are left with the problem of mak- 
ing successful metal to metal seats. 

This has been largely overcome by a 
careful and scientific distribution of the 
metal, and also by using proper propor- 
tions of the metals used in making valve 
bra>ss — namely, copper, tin, lead and 
zinc. 

In the old designs of valves, the bridge 
or diaphragm of the regular globe valve 
was simply a straight partition put 
across the body of the valve. We have 
now got a partition of circular form of 
carefully and evenly distributed metal 
which has largely eliminated the warp- 
ing and twisting of the valve seat face. 
In Gate and Angle valves this partition 
is so formed that it is simply a ring at- 
tached to the walls of the body. It is 
not affected by distortion to the same ex- 
tent as a Globe valve is. 

Radiator Valves 

In radiator valves used on steam the 
pressures rarely are higher than 20 
pounds to the square inch, consequently 
there is no need to use a valve so heavy 
as a standard valve. A much lighter 
valve stands up to the usage and with 
a standard composition disc gives per- 
fectly satisfactory service. Angle valves 
are used most exclusively in this ser- 
vice, and one point to be noted is that 
the seat face of the body should never 
be above the bottom inside level of the 
tail pipe, so that the radiator or pipe to 
which it is attached can be thoroughly 
drained, if necessary. 

In hot water valves the service doesn't 
call for a valve that needs to shut off 
absolutely tight, and in fact some users 



insist on a small hole being drilled in the 
cylinder to be sure that there is a slight 
circulation going on in the radiator at all 
times while the service is in commission. 
The reason for this is that in most cases 
the radiators are placed near the win- 
dows and in very low temperatures if 
the circulation was entirely cut off, there 
is a possibility of freezing and bursting 
the radiator. 

Gate Valves 

The gate valves are preferred and 
used by engineers wherever possible, 
largely because of their straight through 
unopposed passage ways, and for stand- 
ard water service, they can be highly re- 
commended. For steam service the 
principal objection to their use is that 
in closing the valve the disc has a tend- 
ency to cut and score the face of the 
valve. Some makers use the split wedge 
principle of the disc. 

Gate valves are known as S. S. valves 
— that is, stationary spindle valves or 
non-rising spindle valves, and as rising 
spindle valves. Some engineers prefer 
a rising spindle valve, so they can see 
at a glance when the valve is open or 
shut and when they have not got height 
enough to allow the spindle to rise, in- 
sist on having open and shut indicators 
placed on the non-rising spindle valves. 

When gate valves are to be used on 
fire service work, they should always be 
rising spindle or indicator valves, and if 
to meet underwriter requirements should 
be what is known as an 0. S. & Y. valve, 
meaning an outside visible screw, free 
from contact with the water. 

It is always advisable when taking 
orders for hose end valves to find out 
if they are for fire service and also if 
they are to meet underwriter require- 
ments. 

The check valve is a valve that has 
more uncertainty about it than any other 
valve that is in use, mainly because 
there is nothing visible from the outside 
to indicate whether it is functioning or 
not, and as it is an automatic valve de- 
pending on back pressure to close it, 
it always seems to be looked on with 
suspicion by the average engineer. This 
is quite evident by the fact that where- 
ever you see a check valve in use, it is 
almost invariably badly bruised all over 
by hammer marks. It seems second 
nature to almost all engineers that 
whenever he has trouble, that the first 



February 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



25 



thing he must do is to go to the check 
valves and give them a severe hammer- 
ing. The principal causes of trouble 
that a check valve gives is when they 
are working on pipe lines where there is 
trouble with water hammer, and on ra- 
pid working pump lines; and in these 
cases there is so much pounding on the 
seats that the seats and disc become 
pounded out of shape. This, in most 
cases can be remedied by reducing the 
lift of the valve, or by putting a spring- 
behind the disc, or by casting a piston 
on top of the disc, and boring the top of 
the body to suit it, this creating a dash- 
pot to act as a shock absorber. Where- 
ever possible it is always the most re- 
liable to "use a rubber disc in check 
valves as they give the most satisfactory 
service. 

I would now like to make a few re- 
marks about valve use and otherwise. 



There are still pipe fitters who con- 
nect globe valves so that the steam, or 
water comes in the wrong end of the 
valve. The pressure or inlet end of a 
valve should always be under the disc. 
The reason for this is that if it is con- 
nected so the pressure is on top of the 
disc, all the working parts are exposed 
to erosion and wear, which is all avoid- 
ed by connecting at the proper end. 
Some makers cast an arrow on the body 
to show the inlet end of valve. 

It is bad practice, especially in a gate 
or metal disc valve, to close the spindle 
down the very utmost when a valve is 
cold, as when the steam is turned on the 
valve becomes heated and the spindle 
increased in length due to expansion. 

I will now come to a subject which as 
a factory man has always unfavourably 
impressed me, and that is the way some 
pipe fitters use a valve when they are 



installing it. Jt must always be kept 
in mind that a valve, to meet all re- 
quirements and expansion in particular, 
must be made of a ductile metal and this 
being the case a certain amount of care 
must be used in installing it. If a pipe 
fitter places a pipe in his vice and then 
grips the opposite end of a brass valve 
with the largest pipe tongs he has, and 
screws it up home with all his force, 
the chances are that he will spring the 
valve out of shape and is usually aston- 
ished to find the valve leaking. He will 
resent any suggestion that he might be 
the cause of it, but from my own ob- 
servation and the mutilated condition of 
returned valves that have passed 
through my hands, I feel justified in 
saying that there are still some pipe 
fitters who have yet to learn that a valve 
should be put on by gripping the end 
nearest to the pipe. 



Helps for February Advertising 

Some Suggested Paragraphs Which Sanitary and Heating Engineers 
May Use to Advantage in Planning Advertising During This Month 



"KITCHEN PLUMBING" 

Just as essential as the bathroom plumbing, and your heat- 
ing system, is the plumbing in the kitchen. No matter what 
the job may be if you secure our services it will be done 
right. — L. H. Eckhardt, Vancouver, B. C. 

"PUT THE BATH TUB IN NOW" 

Now is the time in this season to put in that bath tub you 
have been thinking about. See us about it for we can give 
you interesting prices and guaranteed workmanship. See us 
in regard to any information concerning plumbing, hot water 
or steam heating. It will be to our mutual benefit. — T. J. 
Minnes, Brantford, Ont. 

sp * * :}: 

"MAKE YOUR BATHROOM DISTINCTIVE" 

Bathrooms that are ordinary can, with the aid of a few 
small fittings, be made distinctive and expressive of the good 
taste of the housewife. Your bathroom equipped with our 
towel bars, sponge holders, tooth brush holders, tumbler hold- 
ers, plate glass mirrors, white enamel cabinets, nickel-plated 
electric brackets, etc., will add wonderfully to the appearance 
as well as to your comfort. A goodly display of these fixtures 
may be seen in our showroom. — Cowans, Brantford, Ont. 

"SAFEGUARD THE CHILDREN" 

While in the home you mothers and fathers take every care 
to safeguard the health of your children. But do you know if 
proper care is taken to protect your children while at school 
or in other public places? 

It is your right and duty to demand that adequate protec- 
tion be given your children in such public places in respect to 
toilet and washroom accommodation, -ventilation, drinking 
water, etc. 

Let us know what your investigation proves and we will help 
you bring about better sanitary conditions in such places, 
(Suggested ad. Name of firm here) 



"END YOUR PLUMBING TROUBLES" 

Don't wait for a small leak to grow bigger. Have it fixed 
now. It costs less in the end. Call us at the first sign of faulty 
pipes or faucets and your plumbing troubles will be ended al- 
most before they have begun. — W. L. Armour, Brantford, Ont. 

"EXTRA HEAT OR HEAT YOU ARE NOT GETTING" 

Possibly there are one or two radiators that do not heat. 
Have our plumbing department examine them and see where 
the fault is. You may desire more hot water from your range 
boiler. Let us connect it to your furnace with a large Domes- 
tic Heater. (By McKelvey & Birch Ltd., Kingston, Ont.) 

"LAUNDRY COMFORT" 

During the winter it is often found that the basement is 
not suited for laundry purposes. We have what is called a 
laundry sink, which is a white enamel laundry tub, and a deep 
kitchen sink combined. It can be installed in your kitchen. 
Space required is only four feet. When the laundry tub is not 
in use there is a cover which closes and acts as a drain board 
to the sink. — McKelvey & Birch Ltd., Kingston, Ont. 

WHAT ABOUT UNSEEN PLUMBING? 

It's unseen; but it's there — between walls, under floors, 
buried in the ground. One-third of the cost for any good 
plumbing job is for that "unseen" work. We believe that no 
part of a plumbing job is more important than the "unseen" 
plumbing. We know that unless "unseen" work is done right 
the first time, using the proper materials and workmanship, 
there is sure to be costly trouble later! Trouble in the "un- 
seen" plumbing means expensive tearing out and replacement 
of walls and floors, with the added cost of repairing the. faulty 
work. Our "unseen" plumbing stands the test of time and 
constant use. Our customers will tell you so. It will be to 
your advantage to consult us about any new installation or 
remodelling job.— Paddon Company, Limited, Windsor, Ont. 



26 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February i, i!>2 





Service 



Helping Our Dealers 
Make Hot Water 
Heating Sales. 



WE ARE distributing to many of your prospective cus- 
tomers copies of the "Warmth" booklet illustrated hei e. 
In "Warmth" we tell of the advantages of Hot Water 
Heating in general and, of course, Gurney Heating in par- 
ticular. We are rather proud of the way we have depicted 
our products, showing them both in relief and as they appear 
in use. Each illustration in three and four colors, brings 
the subject of heating before your prospects in a very attrac- 
tive manner, gets them interested in Gurney heating, and 
makes it an easy matter to close the contract. 

If you have any prospects in view (if you haven't, dig some 
up), send us their names and let us send them a copy for 
you. Or, perhaps you would like to mail them yourself? 
If so, we will supply the books. 



Whichever j 
Do it to- 



THE GURNEY FOUNDRY COMPA1 



LIMITED 



WINNIPEG 



TORONTO and MONTREAL 



VANCOUVI 



Bay goods that arc open to the Unlit of publicity^ 



February 1, L923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



27 




28 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February 1, 1923 




Plumber and Steamfitter of Canada 



ESTABLISHED 1907 

Member Audit Bureau of Circulations 
PUBLISHED TWICE MONTHLY BY 

The MacLean Publishing Company, Limited 

Montreal TORONTO, CANADA Winnipeg 



Vol. XVII. 



FEBRUARY 1, 1923 



No. 3 



Plumber Has Advantage 

A COMMITTEE has been appointed by the American Gas As- 
sociation to deal with "co-operation with the plumber and 
heating dealer." This bears out the theme of the discussion at 
the last convention of the association when the advantages of 
closer relationship between the gas companies and the plumb- 
ers were dealt with. There is no doubt that more co-operation 
between these two factors will do much to further the in- 
terests of both in the sale of gas appliances and the consump- 
tion of gas. 

The plumber is very much in the home, especially in the new 
home being finished. He is in close touch with the builder and 
can act in a more or less advisory capacity where he can do 
much, good work in having sufficient gas facilities provided. 
This is where the plumber has a big advantage over the gas 
company and he should be able to turn it to good advantage. 



Prospects Good for Year 

TN THE whole field of Canadian industry it is doubtful wheth- 
er the year 1922 can show any achievement so thoroughly 
gratifying as in building. It has been an almost epochal per- 
iod. Not only has it witnessed a remarkable expansion in 
the volume and value of work accomplished, but it has seen, 
after two most trying and uncertain years, the restoration of 
conditions as nearly normal as possible. That is, labor has 
bent its efforts toward the attainment of greater productivity; 
capital has loosened slightly; the market for materials has 
reached comparative stability; demand has been sustained in 
healthy and increasing activity; all of which factors have con- 
tributed to a marked quickening of the pulse of the construc- 
tion trades, and to a promise of even larger expansion to 
follow. 

Ninety million dollars more contracts awarded in Canada 
during 1922 than the previous year. Statistics show total 
construction undertaken to a value of $331,843,800, compared 
with $240,133,300 in 1921. Even in 1920— a year of feverish 
expansion and inflated costs — the monetary value of new 
building was $75,000,000 less than last year. In actual volume 
of work performed the 1922 total may be placed 70 per cent, 
above that of 1920, due allowance being made for the present 
lower scale of costs. Going farther back, the figures of 1917, 
1918 and 1919 at $87,298,062, $99,842,300 and $189,821,300, re- 
spectively, look insignificant in comparison. Indeed, not since 
the pre-war period, when for three years (1911-13) the whole 
country enjoyed a phase of unwonted prosperity and develop- 



ment, has any aggregate been recorded to equal that of last 
year. The month of December gave rise to $52,472,400 of fresh 
projects, this being the largest monthly aggregate since April, 
1913, and one which has been exceeded only three times in the 
annals of Canadian building. A glance at the details, showing 
classification of work undertaken, draws attention to the im- 
portance latterly assumed by residential and engineering con- 
struction. 



Plumbers' Wages and Building Cost 

^SfHETHER the aggressive assault made during the year on 
the housing problem has taken much of the edge off de- 
mand is difficult to say. A year ago it was estimated upon re- 
liable authority that the actual shortage of homes in Canada, 
if people were living according to pre-war standards of ac- 
commodation, was 165,000. During the year some 21,000 new 
houses were built. The potential demand would, therefore, 
appear to be little abated. Yet the estimate of 165,000 houses 
represents rather what the country would require if it could 
finance its full needs. It is not the "effective demand." The 
latter, however, has been sharpened by a psychological factor, 
namely the growing popular belief that building costs have 
now fallen to a point where prospective builders have little to 
gain by further delay. So important is this factor that it will 
probably result in the production of even more houses in the 
coming year than in the past. 

Wage scales declined slightly in the year. The Federal De- 
partment of Labor, in reporting the index number of wages 
paid to six main groups of building trades in 13 cities, quotes 
162.5 for 1922, as against 170.5 a year ago. The abrupt ad- 
vance in wages during 1919 and 1920, and subsequent slow de- 
cline, are illustrated in the following table, which shows aver- 
age hourly rates for five years back: 





DD 


•i. 


a 










5 


3 


.5 


to 




M 


5 


d 

3 

JO 


rpem 




inter 


,i in be 


". * 


iH 


m 


a 

O 


5 


n 


s 


5j 


1918 


$ .70 


.57 


.57 


.52 


. .60 


.40 


1919 


79 


.67 


.68 


.61 


.69 


.49 


1920 


1.02 


.79 


.81 


.73 


.83 


.56 


1921 


1.00 


.78 


.80 


.73 


.80 


.52 


1922 


96 


.70 


.75 


.67 


.80 


.46 



Inspiration for Young Men 

HpWO OF Chicago's biggest business men recently stepped 
out of commercial life and were succeeded by young men 
trained in their own organizations. John G. Shedd, whom 
Marshall Field called "the world's greatest merchant," retired 
from the presidency of Marshall Field and Co-, where he had 
started as a $10 a week clerk. He was succeeded by James 
Simpson, who began his career as an office boy. The man 
who took Simpson's place as vice-president also started as an 
office boy. 

J. Ogden Armour also resigned a presidency last week. The 
new president of the gigantic Armour packing interests is F. 
Edi son White. White began his career at the age of seven- 
teen in the blood and slime of the packing house. He worked 
on the killing floor for a year. Within ten years of that time 
he was assistant to one of the company's vice-presidents. 

In the careers of Shedd, Simpson and White there is inspira- 
tion for any young man. Every one of them started at the 
bottom. Every one has reached the top. No one of them has 
any particular advantages as to education — merely determin- 
ation and common sense and a recognition of the duty of big- 
companies in serving the public well. 



February 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND StEAMFITTER 



29 



The Mirrors of Selling Street 

Don't Let Them Reflect Upon You! 



Plumbers will appreciate the "reflections" contained in the following- 
article. This appeared in the January 6 issue of Forbes Magazine, from the 
pen of John E. Rosser. Sensing its interest for the sanitary engineer, as 
well as the lesson it contains for salesmen and distributors, Sanitary Engineer 
reproduces the story for {tie benefit of its readers. 



RUB R. STAMP has one virtue: he 
can repeat whatever is told him. 
In that regard he ranks along with 
the Poll parrot and the phonograph. He 
has the sprightly imagination of a cod- 
fish on ice. In school he was the little 
boy who always began a recitation by 
saying, "The book says — " 

He has put in many an hodr memoriz- 
ing a lot of stuff about "go-getters" 
and "red-blooded he-men" but he never 

Rub R. Stamp 




The chap wKo 
knows his sales - 
talk but ^ets 
lockjaw when he's 
asked a question. 

has got to the part of the book that pre- 
sents problems involving unknown quan- 
tities. He knows several good swim- 
ming strokes, and yet, if he accidentally 
fell into the creek, he would surely 
drown unless somebody threw him a 
chart and compass. 

Stamp is the chap (unless Joe Miller 
deliberately lied about it!) who staked 
his week's salary on the champeen 
fightin' dog. This dog had just one 
manner of attack — always diving under 
the belly of his opponent and getting 
a death-grip on the left hind leg. One 
day along came a fellow who entered a 
dog that didn't carry with him a single 
solitary left hind leg. And, of course, 
the flabbergasted champeen was chewed 
to a deckle-edged frazzle because he 
didn't have resourcefulness enough to 
play a new system. 

Rub R. Stamp gets along well enough 
with his canned spiel until his prospect 
shoots a query at him; then it's amateur 
night for him, and he finds himself ig- 
nominiously yanked off the stage of 



action, with a question-mark gagging 
him tightly about the goozle. 

He will always be in demand for a job 
where somebody is needed to say 
"cuckoo" on the hour, or where a moist 
tongue is required for postage stamps, 
or a quickly portable hatrack is desired 
for the outer hall. 

L. Urid Glare is a gifted liar. Since 
he plays only one-night stands it is 
merely a question of tin.e until he has 
used up all the towns there are and is 
then compelled to get off the earth. Any- 
body who is good at riddles can easily 
figure out where Glare will go when he 
does leave this sphere, but the quotations 
don't indicate any jump in the prices of 
i eal estate in his destined abode because 
of his expected coming. 

He is like a twenty-dollar bill run off 
with a hand-press in the far corner of 
the cellar, for he is fair enough to look 
at, but it is a felony to have him in one's 
possession. To his selling talk he adds 
whatever neat little touch is necessary 
to make it sound well. His gaze is ex- 
tremely brazen, 1 ut at heart he is so 
cowardly he fears his own shadow, which 
at least has the solid virtue of sticking 
with its boss — a quality which Glare 
does not possess. 

L. Urid Glare ignores the fact that 
Truth is the best ally anybody can have 
and that the dreamer-liar makes for him- 
self an impossibly hard job. He for- 
gets that we live in a world of realities 
— a very practical, matter-of-fact world 
— which, with all its imperfections, is 



UVtid Glai'e 




promising 
Salesman— who 
always lets it 
go at that 



yet sound enough to build skyscrapers 
upon — provided we set the walls up 
straight. 

He can't bring himself to place trust 
in the world as it is. That is because he 
is himself a weakling. One day he may 
find that weakness exists primarily 
within himself, and that outside him — 
like the magnetic lines of force that play 
from pole to pole — are truth and 
strength in abundance. Then he may be- 
come the chap it is possible for him to 
become. 

Certainly he will stop lying. 

Rely Upon "Steam" 

Hap Hazard is a lineal descendant of 
the Hopheads on the maternal side and 



Hap Hazard 




The Sales main who 
is always yawping 
about the future 
— but he's a man- 
eating shark at 
Kelly pool 



of the widely distributed family of 
Hooch-Hounds on the paternal. His 
favorite character in fiction is Mr. Mi- 
cawber, and he has a fine business acu- 
men of Colonel Mulberry Sellers. 

On a tour through the Latin countries 
the only word of their lingo that he ac- 
quired was "Manana," and this will be 
the legend on his coat-of-arms when he 
gets time to rig one up. Just now he is 
snoozing sweetly and must not be dis- 
turbed. 

In the vacuum which he is pleased to 
call his mind he has two sure-fire pro- 
jects for achieving great prosperity some 
time in the future: the first, to unearth 
the treasures known to be contained in a 
crock buried at the rainbow's end; and, 
the second, to form an association of 
blowhards, like himself, who shall dry up 
the ocean above sunken vessels, thus 
producing perfectly dry holes from 
which it will be a simple trick to re- 
move the precious cargoes. 

Facts just make Hap Hazard desper- 



30 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



February 1, l'J23 



ately sick; the law of cause and effect 
easily prostrates him. 

Around the merry pool table he finds 
real cronies. Of course, the salary of 
a journeyman pool-player is not a vast 
sum, but the members of the gang are 
agreed that if one of them discovers per- 
petual motion of Captain Kidd's treas- 
ure they will all share in the proceeds; 
so anybody can see how unnecessary 
work is. 

Hap Hazard's brain tests up at a frac- 
tion less than one cockroach power, but 
his crop of hair, firmly set in ivory, 
makes a fine floor mop, and prevents his 
being a total loss. 

He won't become any more valuable to 
himself or to anybody else until he sub- 
stitutes will-power for his present high- 
ly developed wish-power, and begins to 
rely upon steam instead of a dream. 

Have Ammunition Ready 

There are many things the matter 
with Luke Warm, but his most obvious 

Luke Warm 




whose guni\\iig 
out/^it includes 
everything but 
tke skells 

defect is that he is a damphool. He has 
a way of neglecting to take along with 
him the selling equipment which his 
firm provides. He carries nothing with 
which to support his argument in case 
he finds himself in the lair of a pros- 
pect who, being originally a resident of 
old Show-Me County, Missouri, demands 
to see the salesman's credentials and 
Exhibits "A" to "Z" of the wares he 
offers for sale. 

Luke has heard something about the 
power of the hypnotic eye. Someone told 
him about a very strong salesman who 
made effective use of direct talk, with no 
documents or samples in sight, but he 
doesn't seem to know that the twelve- 
cylinder salesman had gumption enough 
to discern that he had encountered a par- 
ticular case and that the next man might 
hanker to see the credentials of the 
house. The strong man had the dope 
with him, all right, but he did not pull 
it out that time. 

Luke doesn't take his outfit along for 
the simple reason that he hasn't wit 
enough to figure out in advance what 



he will need in a tight place. Roosevelt 
never killed anybody, but if he ever had 
committed murder, the victim would 
surely have been the movie cameraman 
who went out to Oyster Bay, persuaded 
Teddy to quit an important conference, 
dress up in riding togs, have his favorite 
horse saddled, and canter down the Sag- 
amore Hill path — and then find that the 
photographer had failed to bring any 
film along. That was all that kept the 
party from being a great success. 

He may come painfully to learn that 
all the gods on Olympus couldn't do any- 
thing for a fool — and he may try to 
cease being one. Then, every day, he'll 
figure out in advance whatever may be 
necessary for the day's work, and he'll 
have his ammunition handy when the 
game is flushed. 



FARM KITCHEN WATER SUPPLY 

(Continued from page 23) 
same way as would be connected up in 
a city home. Such an installation, as 
shown and described here, would prove 
to be a great help to every rural house- 
wife, saving many steps and much time. 



SHOWS COMFORT OF "HEAT BY 
RADIATORS" 

(Continued from page 17) 
excessive use of heavy lumber. Into the 
top of the corners of front frame screw 
two screw eyes and from these run stove 
pipe wire to four points, two in front and 
two to back of picture. Make these 
points well to the side and at least a 
little above the picture, and in tighten- 
ing the wire, which is quite unnotice- 
able, one can easily line up the frame- 
work to be straight. 

Where beaverboard is inclined to not 
fit true or show ragged the use of quar- 
ter round, or shoestrip, will overcome 
this. 

In sawing beaverboard always keep 
the finished surface nearest to the saw 
hand but roughness can be easily re- 
moved by a rub of sandpaper along the 
edges. 

If the entire back and sides, wood and 
beaverboard, are also tinted with the 
same color or paint a much cleaner view 
is given on the store side. 

If you will create a space where this 
material you have used here can be 
stored away and kept clean, then you 
will find that, after you have done three 
or four different windows, you have 
equipment for a steady change of win- 
dow trim with very little future expen- 
diture. The small pieces of beaverboard 
are useful for future windows and can 
be used any number of times. Be sure 
to keep in a dry place. 

Paint Floor Brown 

The floor should be painted a brown 
or any harmonizing color for oak. 

Wire in two concealed cleat receptacles 
inside the top member of front frame- 
work with two 40 watt bulbs for light- 
ing. 

Procure a radiator of a size say 2 x 10 
x 32 and screw the necessary valve and 



air vent in. See that the radiator is at 
least clean, if not painted. 

Set up a doll and a dog as shown. 

Make the four small signs and plate 
on the side walls. 

Cut a circular piece of beaverboard 
about twenty-four inches in diameter 
and a reasonably recognizable sun can 
be made by a blotch of red in the center, 
with shafts of yellow and white paint 
(water or oil) worked to points at the 
edge. 

Paint a sign, on beaverboard eighteen 
inches wide by six feet six inches long, 
with the words "Heat by Radiators." 
You may have to have these signs done 
by a show card writer. 

Granted that you have to do this then 
the material for this window should 
not cost more than $12.00 as follows: — 



3 — 4 x 8 sheets of Beaverboard . . . 5.76 

Lumber . ^ 75 

Mahogany stain 45 

Water paint (1 color) 45 

Angle brackets or plate (10) 50 

Nails 09 

Showcards 4.00 



$12.00 

If the lights in the picture alone are 
used, larger ones may be better, with the 
surroundings in darkness you will find 
that this window will stand out very 
prominently and because of its out-of- 
the-ordinary appearance will cause many 
to stop and view it. 



Catalogs and Booklets 

Those interested in any of the catalogs 
described below can procure a copy of the 
same by writing direct to these firms. 
Mention that you noticed this in Sanitary 
Engineer. 

HOME INSTRUCTION FOR 

SHEET METAL WORKERS 

A new book entitled, Home Instruction 
for Sheet Metal Workers, is being publish- 
ed by the U. P. C. Book Co., Inc., of New 
York City. This book contains much prac- 
tical information on sheet metal and build- 
ing in general. It is by William Neubecker, 
and edited by Frank X. Morie. There are 
over 400 pages and 684 illustrations. There 
are also fifteen folding charts in a separ- 
ate binder, which are intended for use in 
conjunction with the instruction manual. It 
includes instructions on cutting, forming, 
soldering, preparing full-size details from 
architects blue-prints, developing the pat- 
terns, laying out the work on sheet metal, 
and setting the work together. Other fea- 
tures in the book are chapters on skylight 
and louvre work, including flat, hipped and 
pitched skylights, stationary and movable 
louvres, turret sash, gearing, etc. 



WARMTH— A NECESSITY 

"Warmth — A Necessity," is the title of a 
new booklet issued by the Gurney Foundry 
Co., Ltd., Toronto. This book is a brief 
treatise on mankind's necessity for warmth. 
It pictures a comparison between the dark- 
ness and chill of winter's night scenes com- 
pared with the warmth of the modern 
heated home. It is aptly illustrated 
throughout, special drawings illustrating 
the radiation of heat, attracting attention. 
This booklet also draws attention to the 
Gurney "G" series of round hot water boil- 
ers. The various types of radiators appli- 
able to different styles of rooms, is an- 
other feature in this handy book. 



February 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



31 



Patterns for Octagonal Branch 

By O. W. Kothe, Principal, St. Louis Technical Institute, St. Louis, 
Missouri. Written for Sanitary Engineer. 



AS A PROBLEM of development, 
the octagonal branch is interest- 
ing, in that it shows the features 
clear as an instruction problem, than a 
round branch. Sheet metal construction 
is one of geometry and hence pattern 
drafting forms part of the sheet metal 
worker's education; but it is not all that 
is required. The matter of design and 
proportion and calculation is equally im- 
portant to the laying out of patterns. In 
fact, the mere pattern drafting is more 
for the layman mechanic, while the de- 
sign, proportion and engineering part 
of it as well as the pattern drafting is 
for the foreman, superintendent and em- 
ployer. 

In taking on our branch in this draw- 
ing, we first draw the axis line of branch 
and proportion the base to section A and 
then draw section B, after which section 
C is developed. After this the elevation 
is divided into triangles and for these 
triangles diagram of true lengths is 
constructed. That is picking the lines 
from the elevation as 2-3; 3-4; 4-5; 5-6, 



etc., and settng them on a horizontal 
line in diagram, after which lines are 
erected to equal those in the sections. 
This will give the true flare between 
the points of the section and produces 
the true lengths. 

After this the pattern can be set out 
by drawing a line 0-0 equal to 1-2 of 
elevation. Then square out lines in pat- 
terns as 0-1 and 0-2, making those dis- 
tances equal to the points in section A 
and also in B, which will give lines 1-2 
in pattern. This can also be done by pick- 
ing line 0-1 and setting as 0-1 in pattern 
and then picking line 1-2 in diagram and 
setting as 1-2 in pattern. Then pick the 
octagonal lines from B and also from A 
and strike the arcs 3 and 4, as shown. 
Cross these lines with true lines 2-3 and 
3-4 from diagram. Repeat in this way 
until points 10-11 are established and 
draw lines through all points where arcs 
cross and the pattern is finished. Laps 
for assembling should be allowed extra, 
draw lines through all points where arcs 
cross and the pattern is finished. Laps 
for assembling should be allowed extra. 



WATER PLANT MAY START IN 1924 

Windsor. — The Border cities can have 
their water filtration plant in operation 
late in 1924, J. Clark Keith, engineer of 
the Essex Border Utilities Commission, 
said following the announcement that 
the project had been approved in Ford, 
Sandwich and Riverside. 

"I am confident' that we can complete 
the plant by that time," said Mr. Keith. 
"It's up to the commission, however. 
Just how fast they will want to go 
ahead with the project, now that they 
have been given a mandate from the 
ratepayers, I do not know. 

"The plans we have made to date 
have only been very general ones; just 
detailed enough for us to compile our 
estimate of cost. They will have to be 
prepared in detail, and a great deal of 
preliminary organization work will 
have to be done. But, with all of this, 
I am confident that we can begin the 
delivery of filtered water by the end of 
1924 if the commission wants to push 
construction work." 




HALF PATTE.RN 



:\2 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February 1, iy23 



News Notes From Coast to Coast 



CONTRACTS AWARDED 

London, Ont. — Liphardt Bros., Water- 
loo, have plumbing contract for new 
school in the south ward of the town. 



OBITUARY 

The sympathy of the trade is extend- 
ed to John Wright, Toronto, in the death 
on January 30 of his wife. Mr. Wright 
has long been prominent in the plumbing 
industry and has held several important 
offices in the provincial and Dominion 
plumbing societies. 



INCORPORATION 

Victoria, B. C. — Incorporation of the 
Andrew Sheret, Limited, covering the 
interests of Mr. Andrew Sheret, for 
many years conducting a plumbing busi- 
ness in this city, is announced in the 
current number of the Provincial 
Gazette. 



STEAMFITTER OVERCOME BY GAS 

Montreal. — While repairing gas pipes, 
1. Chevalier, steamfitter, residing 
at 271 Gauthier street, was over- 
come by gas and had to be removed to 
the Notre Dame Hospital. He was kept 
there overnight but had so far recovered 
that he was able to leave the hospital 
and go to his home. 



HAMILTON SOCIETY ELECTS 
OFFICERS FOR 1923 

On Monday evening, January 22nd, 
the Hamilton Society of Sanitary & 
Heating Engineers held their annual 
election of officers. The new officers for 
1923 are President, P. A. Moore. Vice- 
President, Wm. Newell; Secty.-Treas., C. 
G. Stewart; Assistant Secty., Thos. E. 
Arthur. 



GROUP ALL INSPECTORS UNDER 
ONE HEAD 

Montreal. — Creation of a Civic Inspec- 
tion Department in which will be cen- 
tralized the functions of inspectors now 
operating under four separate city de- 
partments is among proposals for re- 
organization of City Hall services 
planned for 1923. 

With the allotment of one inspector 
to one district, it is claimed that the 
man would soon become familiar with 
all conditions in his area, would be able 
to report on them more intelligently than 
one man can when passing from 
one new place to another, and that in- 
spection therefore would be tightened up, 
to the benefit of both city and taxpayers. 



Doings in the Plumbing and 
Heating Industry 



\\ ANT TENDERS 

Grimsby, Ont. — Town council wants 
tenders on installation of a hot-water 
heating system in fire hall. No closing 
date set. 



INCINERATOR AS CENTRAL HEAT- 
ING PLANT 

St. John. N. B. — Although it has not 
been discussed publicly, some of St. 
John's citizens are of the opinion that a 
local incinerator might be used as a 
central heating plant, and in that way 
bring in a revenue of a considerable 
amount to the city's funds. 



NEW PUMP IS NOW 

BEING INSTALLED 

Lethbridge, Alta. — The American Well 
company, of Aurora, III., are now install- 
ing the new waterworks pump to take 
the place of the one which failed to live 
up to the guarantee. The capacity of 
this pump is four million imperial gal- 
lons per day. The average amount of 
water pumped per day is one and a half 
million gallons. This will put the city 
well within the requirements of the 
board of insurance underwriters in the 
matter of pumping capacity. 




THOS. E. ARTHUR 



Elected Assistant-Secretary of Hamilton 
Society of Sanitary and Heating Engin- 
eers. 



PLUMBING CONTRACTOR HAS EX- 
CITING STRUGGLE WITH WILDCAT 

St. John, N. B. — For an hour, struggl- 
ing against a wildcat, A. P. Conwell, of 
Sussex, N. B., one of the well-known 
plumbing and heating contractors of 
Eastern Canada, had a very exciting 
and menacing experience. 

Mr. Conwell was in the woods on a 
rabbit-shooting trip with one of fhijs 
young sons. As he was walking through 
a grove of trees a wildcat sprang from 
the boughs. It missed Mr. Conwell and 
landed nearby in the snow, the contrac- 
tor having heard the warning rustle 
overhead and dodged just in time. The 
wildcat sprang at Mr. Conwell from the 
snow and fastened its claws in his flesh 
about the legs. Mr. Conwell used the 
shotgun he carried very effectively on 
the ferocious animal, but although he 
forced the wildcat to release its hold a 
number of times, the animal would re- 
turn to the attack after a pause. 

Mr. Conwell's young son brought two 
farmers, who shot the animal. Mr. 
Conwell was carried to a farmhouse and 
given first aid. In a few hours he was 
able to walk home to Sussex. 



WANT PUBLIC CONVENIENCES IN 
ST. JOHN 

St. John, N. B. — A problem which has 
long been before the citizens is that of 
public conveniences. Although St. John 
has a population of around eighty thou- 
sand, there are no premises set aside for 
the convenience of the public. Although 
practically every citizen has at one time 
or another commented on the situation, 
and some years ago the matter was 
placed before the city council by one of 
its members, nothing has been done in 
the matter, and therefore things remain 
as they were. However, in certain circles, 
the matter is again coming under discus- 
sion, and Sanitary Engineer's repre- 
sentative has been informed that it will 
not be long before it is pointed out to 
the city council that two or three build- 
ings could be erected in the city of St. 
John for the convenience of the public, 
and made self-supporting. It was point- 
ed out to our representative that in the 
centre of the city it would be possible 
to have premises underground for ladies 
and gentlemen, with a small charge for 
use of W. C. and for a wash and brush 
up. A shoe shine could also be run in 
connection with the service. It is not 
known what attitude the city council 
may take when this question is brought 
up, but it is believed that if the city 
fathers could be convinced that such 
places can be made self-supporting, they 
would carry the thing through. 



February 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



33 



WILL LAY OUT HEATING FOR 
VESSELS 

Windsor. — Donald Stewart, consulting 
engineer in heating and radiation, has 
I been retained to lay out the heating anc' 
i ventilation systems on the Detroit and 
| Cleveland Navigation Company's two 
new boats. The boats, which are near- 
ing completion, are 600 feet long - , the 
largest inland navigation vessels in the 
world. 



CUNNINGHAM & HILL PROPERTIES 
NOT AFFECTED 

In an item referring to transfers of 
property in Toronto, a daily newspaper 
erroneously stated that the properties 
of W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., whole- 
sale plumbing and heating specialties, 
had been sold. W. H. Cunningham 
stated to Sanitary Engineer that his 
properties at 269 and 271 Richmond St. 
W., Toronto, had not been affected in 
this manner. 



ADVISES JANITORS TO TAKE 
PLUMBING COURSE 

London, Ont. — A rather unique sug- 
gestion was made at a meeting of build- 
ing committee of Board of Education 
when, during a discussion over cost of 
plumbing repairs in city schools, Trus- 
tee Mrs. Hunt suggested that the jani- 
tors be given a short course in pipe fit- 
ting and plumbing at the Technical 
School, so that they could take charge of 
all minor repairs of this sort. 

Trustee Lawrason expressed the 
opinion that small repairs should be 
taken care of by the school caretakers, 
but Trustee Willmot was of the opinion 
that such an undertaking might involve 
the purchase of a large amount of ex- 
pensive tools for the various schools 
where this work was being done. 

Superintendent Robinson, however, 
pointed out that the works department 
aiready has complete equipment of tools 
and in the case of small repairs the jani- 
tor already does the work. In some 
cases, however, it would be rather an 
expensive undertaking to allow an in- 
experienced man to repair or renew 
plumbing when the job required a skilled 
workman. 

Trustee Mrs. Hunt then voiced her 
suggestion that the janitors be trained 
in this work. It was a matter well worth 
investigating, she said. The Technical 
School had the facilities and the men 
could be trained at no expense to the 
board in their spare time. 

Trustee Lawrason thought that a jani- 
tor qualified to take charge of a boiler 
and with a stationary engineer's cer- 
tificate should be able to take charge of 
minor work of this sort. 

No action was taken but the matter 
will undoubtedly be discussed at a later 
date. 

i 




C. C. STEWART 

Elected Secretary-Treasurer Hamilton 
Society of Sanitary and Heating En- 
gineers. 



WILL INSTALL NEW SOFTENING 

PLANT AT POWER HOUSE 

Moose Jaw, Sask. — The city electric 
superintendent, J. D. Peters, placed be- 
fore the city council, through the city 



THE Empire Brass Mfg. Co.. Ltd., 
of London and Toronto, (Manu- 
facturers of "Emco Quality" Brass 
Goods) held their Third Annual General 
Sales Convention at their head office in 
London, in January. The meetings were 
full of life and spirit and practical de- 
monstrations were given covering a 
number of lines — installed as in actual 
service. The technical information im- 
parted is expected to prove of great 
value to the salesmen in further fitting 
them for supplying the trade with its 
proper needs. 

By way of recreation the evenings 
were full of enjoyment. One very plea- 
sant evening was spent at the home of 
C. H. Ivey. when the salesmen were 
entertained at bridge whist, followed by 
a buffet luncheon and refreshments. 

The opening address at the convention 
was given by C. F. Stevens, Vice-Presi- 
dent, in the absence (on account of ill- 
ness) of T. A. Stevens, President and 
general manager. Addresses on the fol- 
lowing subjects were also given during 
the convention: — 



commissioners, a recommendation calling 
for the installation of an additional 
water softening plant at a cost of $1,877 
f.o.b. Toronto, or about $1,900 laid down 
in this city. The superintendent men- 
tioned that the plant at present installed 
did excellent work, but was only capable 
of handling about half of the raw water 
that was used. The intention when the 
plant was installed had been that the 
system should be a two-unit one, and the 
superintendent therefore now recom- 
mended the purchase of the additional 
machinery. 



FIND FARM HOME LACKS 

DEVICES TO SAVE LABOR 

Brandon, Man. — Delegates to the 
United Farmers' convention occupied the 
greater part of the morning session in 
discussing the survey of rural condi- 
tions made by the farm women. This 
survey brought out a lack of labor-sav- 
ing devices in the convention that a 
greater degree of comfort and content 
among the farm women would do more 
to advertise the agricultural advantages 
of Western Canada than many immi- 
gration agents. The United Farm 
Women are to continue their rural 
survey and the present exhaustive report 
will be printed and given with circula- 
tion in an effort to raise the status of 
comfort and convenience in Manitoba, 
farm homes. 



Foundry Practice, A. J. Palmer, Supt. 
Steam & Water Valves, Herbert Smith, 
Asst. Supt. 

Metals, C. H. Ivey. 

Closet Tanks, Fittings & Automatic 
Syphons, J. H. Stevens. 

Machine Shop Practice, Samuel 
Thorpe. 

Supply Pipes and Traps, W. H. 
Darling. 

Corporation Brass Goods & Tapping 
Machine Demonstration, A. S. Branston. 

Compression and Self Closing Work, 
Chas. Chapman. 

What was said to be the outstanding 
address at the convention was that giv- 
en by Herbert Smith, newly appointed 
assistant superintendent. Mr. Smith is 
the latest addition to the firm's factory 
staff. He has made a specialty of valves 
land their manufacture flpr the past 
twenty years, having been connected 
with several of the largest organiza- 
tions in that line. 



Annual Sales Convention Empire Brass Co. 

Practical Demonstrations of Lines Installed as in 
Actual Service Very Instructive to Salesmen — 
Social Events Much Appreciated 



34 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



February 1, 1923 



Sir Edmund Walker 
Suggests Turnover 
Tax of One Per Cent 

Sir Edmund Walker, president of the 
Canadian Bank of Commerce, in dis- 
cussing the subject of taxation in his 
recent address at the annual meeting of 
the Bank said: — 

"In 1919 and in every year since I 
have referred to the very serious" and 
difficult problem of taxation. In that 
year I ventured to say that 'the whole 
question should be approached without 
that class feeling which often causes 
taxes to be so apportioned that bitter- 
ness and a sense of injustice are felt by 
many who do not object to being heavily 
taxed so long as those who really can 
afford to pay their share do not escape. 
The income tax should be paid by a 
much larger number of citizens. In 
1920 I urged a turnover tax of one per 
cent, on sales of commodities, and I 
stated that such a tax would provide a 
substratum of tax revenue, in which it 
is true that all would join alike, paying 
in precise proportion to their expendi- 
tures for commodities, but the manner 
in which those who have larger incomes 
would be taxed through the income tax 
would provide for that difference in 
treatment which modern taxation recog- 
nizes.' Much study has been given, es- 
pecially in the United States, to such a 
form of taxation and, while we must 
avoid double taxation on great staples 
dealt in by brokers and dealers on the 
public exchanges, the turnover tax is 
one of the least complicated and most 
easily collected of taxes. 

The Turnover Tax 

"Canada is frequently complimented 
by students of taxation in the United 
States and Great Britain on its sales 
tax, but a much larger revenue, in a 
form much less hurtful to production, 
would result from a turnover tax of 
one per cent. Such a revenue would 
make it possible to lessen the scale of 
super-taxes now imposed on incomes and 
other unfair taxes on enterprises, the 
ruinous result of which is evident to all 
who give any thoughtful attention to 
the matter. A study of conditions in 
Great Britain to-day should convince the 
most ardent believer in super-taxes that 
you cannot have it both ways. You 
cannot on the one hand by unfair 
taxation strip those who have saved or 
made money, and on the other look to 
the same individuals for aid." 



CITY CAN DISTRIBUTE COST OF 
LAYING PIPES 

Montreal. — By an amendment to the 
'City charter, passed at the recent ses- 
sion of the Legislature, the laying of 
-water service pipes to dwelling houses 
:ait a distance from water mains will be 
facilitated, according to information 
supplied by H. . A. Terreault, chief en- 




F. R. MAXWELL. 

The cut of Thos. Maxwell of Toronto 
Was inadvertently published in place of 
the above cut of F. R. Maxwell of Tor- 
onto, former President of Canadian So- 
ciety D. S. & H. E., who was re- 
elected Alderman in Ward 8, Toronto, 
for 1923, and elected Chairman of the 
Board of Works for the city. 



gineer of the city. There are many 
instances where houses, constructed in 
the outlying wards have difficulty in 
getting water supply on account of the 
cost of laying the water pipes. An 
amendment made a few years ago to 
the city charter authorized the city 
to proceed with the work pro- 
vided the interested owners of property 
are willing to pay 6 per cent, on the 
amount of the investment. The latest 
amendment enables the city to distri- 
bute the cost on proprietors without get- 
ting their previous consent. 

Discussing the new amendment, Mr. 
Terreault showed that it was advanta- 
geous for the city to possess the larger 
powers, and it would obviate delays 
that now occur. The Legislature, in 
the first amendment, restricted the ex- 
penditure for laying water service pipes 
to $250,000 a year which was a guar- 
antee that extravagant expenditure 
would not be indulged in for the bene- 
fit of those householders living at im- 
practical distances from the water 
mains of the city. 



SEWERAGE SCHEME TO COST 
MILLIONS 

Replying to deputations from North 
Toronto which asked the Toronto civic 
Works Committee for information re- 
garding sewers, Works Commissioner 
Harris let drop the information that 
the proposed new sewerage scheme for 
North Toronto will cost "many millions 
of dollars." 

A deputation of property owners 
wanted a sewer constructed on Mill- 
wood road, to fit in with the proposed 
new scheme. They did not wish to wait 
until the scheme was formulated and 



adopted by Council, but to go ahead as 
soon as possible, so that they could 
commence building. Commissioner 
Harris promised to have a report on this 
for the next meeting. 

The next deputation consisted of A. 
O. Thorne and W. G. Ellis of the North 
Toronto Ratepayers' Association, who 
said the people of North Toronto were 
anxious to know what the Works Com- 
missioner had in mind for them. They 
thought that publication of the extent 
of the scheme now would cause an in- 
flux of people into North Toronto. 

Mr. Harris promised that details of 
the new sewerage plan for North Tor- 
onto would be brought before the com- 
mittee at the earliest possible date. 




Henry: "Say, what's the best way to 
teach a girl to swim?" 

Harold: "That's a cinch. First, put 
your left arm under her waist, then 
gently take her left hand — " 

Henry: "Oh, say, boy, she's my sister," 

Harold: "Aw. Push her off the dock." 
* * * 

We imagine a good many persons 
would be in favor of joining an organ- 
ization which would have for its objec- 
tive the extermination of that class 
(which doesn't include plumbers) who 
go out for something to eat at 10.30 a. 
m., combining breakfast and lunch in 
one. This is not serious in* itself. It 
might be allowed to pass if they did not 
refer to the thing as "bruncheon" — 
breakfast and luncheon, you get the 
idea. We feel this matter so keenly 
that we are quite ready to whet an axe 
any time. 

* * *' * 

Roy Simpson, negro laborer, was put- 
ting in his first day with a construc- 
tion gang whose foreman was known for 
getting the maximum amount of work 
out of his men. Simpson was helping in 
the task of moving the right-of-way and 
all day long he carried heavy timbers 
and ties until at the close of the day he 
was completely tired out. Came quitting 
time. Before he went he approached the 
boss and said: 

"Mister, you sure you got me down 
on the payroll?" 

The foreman looked over the list of 
names he held. "Yes," he said, finally. 
"Here you are — Simpson — Roy Simpson 
That's right, isn't it?" 

"Yaas suh, boss," said the negro, "das 
right. I thought mebbe you had me down 
as Sampson." 



February 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



35 



Market Conditions and Tendencies 





Price Trend on Sanitary and Heating Supplies 









Markets at a Glance 



WITH the exception of closet tanks and seats, 
practically all the current market develop- 
ments affecting sanitary and heating mater- 
ials are in an upward direction. Higher quota- 
tions appear on cast and malleable pipe fittings, 
as well as bushings, unions and plugs. Radiators 
have also been advanced in price through a revision 
of four points in the discounts. Higher prices have 
now materialized on cotton wastes, while upward 
developments in pig iron again attract atten- 
tion from the viewpoint of their effect on finished 
materials. The slightly lower price levels on 
tanks and seats are in line with the revisions form- 
erly listed on closet combinations. Other plumb- 
ing and steam-fitting supplies appearing with high- 
er prices are: zinc sheets, tin plates and wrenches 
of various kinds. The new discount on radiator 



valves is 55 and 25 per cent. Copper and brass 
sheets have been slightly advanced in some 
quarters, and a firm tone exists in primary mar- 
kets. This upward tendency is also evident in 
other lines, such as tubing sheets and lead pro- 
ducts. Wrought piping remains very firm, while 
it is stated that some slightly higher levels on boiler 
tubes would not be surprising in the near future. 
The opinion also prevails that lead pipe and 
solders may be revised upward. That certain dis- 
counts on brass compression goods may also de- 
velop is the opinion in certain quarters of the trade. 
It is noted that the stove foundry men receive a 
wage increase, this being one of the factors out- 
lined by range and furnace manufacturers when 
the recent new prices went into effect. 



Montreal Markets 

MONTREAL, January 30. — A firm tendency in the markets 
for plumbing and steam-fitting supplies is again evidenced 
by a number of price revisions in an upward direction. 
Various lines are quoted at higher figures, including tin plate, bar 
iron and steel products, cotton wastes, larger sized eavestrough and 
conductor pipe, brass and copper sheets. A change upwards of 
minor proportions is also made in zinc sheet quotations. Various 
lines of scrap materials display a firmer tone, and brass and copper, 
rubber and wrought iron waste are slightly higher in price. The 
stronger tendency in galvanized sheets is reflected in some quar- 
ters, certain jobbing houses increasing their prices, while this firmer 
tone is also causing a stiff er feeling in the market for range boilers 
and corrugated sheets. Revised discounts off new lists are now 
quoted on radiator valves. 



NEW HIGHER PRICES ON TIN 
PLATE 

Montreal. 

As outlined two weeks ago, there has 
been a very firm tone on primary tin- 
plate markets, and higher prices on the 
local market would not be surprising. 
These have now materialized, and follow- 
ing are revised quotation's; 

TIN PLATE— 

20 x 28 x 100 'lb. basis 14 00 

20 x 28 IC, 112s 14 50 

20 x 28 IX, 112s 16 00 

20 x 28 IXX, 56s 9 50 

20 x 28 IXXX, 56s 11 00 

TERNE PLATE— 

20 x 28 IC, 112s, 200 lb 13 25 

20 x 28 IC, 112c, 214 lb 13 75 

CANADA PLATE— 

Half bright 52s 4 85 

Half bright 60s 4 90 

Blued 52s 5 10 

Blued 60s 5 15 

Welsh, polished, 52s 6 50 

Welsh, polished, 60s 6 75 

Galvanized 52s , 7 50 

Galvanized 60s 7 75 



LARGER SIZED TROUGH AND PIPE 
QUOTED HIGHER 

Montreal. — 

Through increasing list prices, sub- 
stantial advances are shown in quota- 
tions on 15 inch and 18 inch eavestrough 
and 5 inch and 6 inch conductor pipe, 
it is pointed out by manufacturers that 
these sizes are not sold in large quanti- 
ties, in fact they are not usually stocked. 
When an order is received it requires 
special attention and time, thus the cost 
of producing is much higher than on or- 
dinary sizes sold. Formerly differen- 
tials did not allow this extra expense. 
Other sizes of both trough and pipe 
are unchanged, as follows; 
EAVESTROUGH— 

O. G. round and half round, per 140 ft. 8 

in., $16.90; 10 in., $ 18.70 ; 12 in., J22.20; 15 in.. 

$35.50; 18 in., $45.00. 

O.G. Square bead, per 100 ft.: 8 in.. $15.90: 
10 in., $17.70; 12 in., $21.20 ; 15 in., $34.50; 18 
in.. $44.00. 

Discount 70 per cent. 



CONDUCTOR PIPE— Round, Plain and Cor- 
rugated. per 100 ft.; 2 in., $18.40: 3 in.. $22.30; 
4 in, $29.60; 5 in., $48.00 ; 6 in:, $58.80 

Discount 70 per cent. 
CONDUCTOR ELBOWS— 

Plain or corrugated, price per dos. 
2 in., $5.25; 3 in., $6.00: 4 in., $10.50; 6 In., 
$24.00; € in.. $29.00. 

Discount 60 per cent. 

SLIGHT INCREASE NOTED IN ZINC 
SHEETS 

Montreal. 

Following the advance in quotations 
on other lead and zinc products two 
weeks ago, a slight increase is now made 
in zinc sheet prices in broken lots. Al- 
though spelter on primary markets has 
been a little easier, this market is again 
firmer, in line with other metals. Tin., 
copper and lead remain in their improv- 
ed market position, remarkable strength 
being shown in lead at the present time. 
Prevailing prices are the following;; 

LEAD AND ZINC PRODUCTS— 

Lead (pipe, per 100 lbs., up to 2" 14 0C 

Do., 2" to 8" 15 00 

Do., 8" and over 16 OO 

Lead waste, per 100 lbs 15 00 

Note — Lead pipe is subject to a discount of 10%. 

Lead traps and bends 15% 

Lead wool, lb 141,4 

Lead sheets, 2% lbs., sq. ft. lb 12 

Lead sheets, 2V> lbs., sq. ft. lb 12 

Lead sheets, 3 to 3% lbs., sq. ft. Ib.. . 11% 

Do., 4 to 8 lbs., sq. ft. lb 10% 

Cut sheets, %c. lb. extra and cut sheets 

to size, %c. lb. extra. 

Solder, guaranteed, lb 27 

Do., strictly, lb 24 

Do., commercial, lb 23 

Do., wiping, lb 23 

Do., wire, lb 38 

Zinc, sheets, caaks 11 

Do., broken lots O 12 



GENERAL ADVANCE IN COTTON 
WASTE QUOTATIONS 

Montreal. 

As outlined in previous reports in 
Sanitary Engineer new higher prices 
have been expected on cotton wastes- 



36 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February 1, 1923 



These have now materialized, cream 
polishing- being two cents per pound 
higher, while other grades of white 
wastes are increased one cent per lb. 
Certain lines of colored are also in- 
creased one cent per lb. Although the 
lower grades are unchanged. Wool 
packings are one cent higher on all 
grades. Following are present prices; 

COTTON WASTES— Per lb. 

Cream polishing 21 

White, XXX extra 18 

White. XX grand 17 

White XLCR 16 

X Empire 14i/> 

X Press 13 

Colored — 

Fancy 015 

Lion Q isy. 

Standard 12 

Popular 10 

Keen 08 

Wool Packing — 

Arrow 25 

Axle 21 

Anvil 17 

Dominion Wipers — 

White cotton 18 

Colored cotton . , . , , , . . , , , , . , . . 13 

FAIR VOLUME OF BUSINESS IN 
SOIL PIPE 

Montreal. 

Current trade in soil pipe and fittings 
is again said to be fair, and up to expec- 
tations for this time of year. Manu- 
facturers describe the undertone of the 
market as firm in view of the increased 
costs of raw material, and fuel, and fol- 
lowing are prevailing discounts; 

SOIL PIPE— 

2 and 3 inch 35% 

4 inch 35% 

6 and G inch 35% 

8 inch net 

FITTINGS — 

2 to 6 inch 45% 

8 inch net 



FIRMER TONE IN SOME SCRAP 
METALS 

Montreal. 

A firming tendency is noted in certain 
lines of scrap metals, particularly brass 
and copper, land quotations on these are 
generally advanced slightly. Wrought 
iron prices are one dollar per ton higher, 
although other lines of iron and steel 
are dull 'and unchanged. The strength 
of rubber in primary markets is reflect- 
ed in waste, and both automobile tires 
and rubber shoes show a 'slight advance. 
Dealers report an improvement during 
the past few weeks, a fair amount of 
activity accompanying the firmer market 
tone'. Following are average dealers' 
buying prices; 
SCRAP MATERIALS — 

Automobile tires 50 

Rubber shoes 03 

Yellow brass O 05% to 06 

Red brass 09 

Light brass 04% 

Scrap zinc 04% 

Lead, heavy 05 

Lead, tea 03 

Light copper 08% to 09 

Heavy copper 11% 

Wroight iron, R. Rd.. No. 1, per gr. ton 12 00 

Malleable scrap (ton) 9 00 to 10 00 

Pipe scrap (ton) 7 00 

Heavy me'ting steel 9 00 9 50 

Mo. 2 busheling 3 00 

Bciler plate 3 00 to 9 00 

No. 1 machinery cast 20 00 to 22 00 



ately five per cent, through a revision in 
discounts. Following are revised dis- 
counts: — 
PIPE FITTINGS — 

Cast iron fittings 22% 

Plugs, cast iron 22% 

Do., solid 22% 

Do., countersunk 22% 

Bushings, cast 25% 

Do., malleable 25% 

Unions 40% 

Flanged unions 22% 

Flanged fittings 27%% 

Flanged fittings 27% 

Dart unions, black 33 1-8% 

Dart unions, galv 133} 

Nipples, % to 4", close and short 65% 

Do., long «o% 

Do., 4% to 8", close and short 45% 

Do., long 50% 

Couplings, 4" and under 25% 

Do., 4%" and larger 5% 

Malleable Fittings — 

Piece list effective June 1st, 1922. Discoun* 
68 per cent. 



CHAIN WRENCHES ARE ADVANCED 
IN PRICE 

Montreal. 

New higher prices are issued on chain 
wrenches, showing an increase of ap- 
proximately 12Y2 per cent. 



VERY FIRM UNDERTONE IN 
WROUGHT PIPE 

Montreal. 

While the undertone of the wrought 
iron and steel pipe- market has been firm 
for some weeks past, this tendency is 
now even more pronounced according to 
Local manufacturers. This tendency is 
evidenced by the action on the part of 
certain American producers in increas- 
ing quotations one point. This revision 
has not been generally announced up to 
the present, but such a development 
would not be surprising. Domestic 
quotations remain under list No. 57. 

WROUGHT PIPE 
Price List No. 57. November, 1922. 

Standard Buttweld Pipe S/C 

Steel Gen. Wrot. Iron 
Blk. Galv. Blk. Galv. 

Size 

% in 6.00 8.00 

% in 3.96 6.00 7.20 9.30 

% in 3.96 6.00 7.20 9.30 

% in 5.02 6.55 7.31 8.93 

% in 6.10 7.82 8.86 10.70 

1 in 8.67 11.22 12.75 15.47 

1% in 11.73 15.18 17.25 20.93 

1% in 14.03 18.15 20.63 25.03 

2 in 18.87 24.42 27.75 33.67 

2% in 29.84 38.61 

3 in 39.02 50.49 

3% in 50.60 64.40 

4 in 59.95 76.30 

Standard Lapweld Pipe S/C 
Per 100 feet. 

Steel Gen. Wrot. Iron 
Size Blk. Galv. Blk. Galv. 

2 in 22.20 27.75 31.08 37.00 

2% in 32.76 41.54 46.80 56.16 

3 in 42.84 54.32 61.20 73.44 

3% in 31.52 65 32 73 60 88.32 

4 in 61.04 77.39 87.20 104.64 

4% in 7.12 90.17 1.07 1.27 

B in 82.88 105.08 1.24 1.48 

6 in 1.08 1.36 1.61 1.92 

7 in 1.40 1.79 2.07 2.50 

8L in 1.48 1.88 2.18 2.63 

9 in 2.07 2.62 2.97 3.59 

10L in 1.92 2 43 2 82 3.39 

10 in 2.47 3.13 3.63 4.37 



NEW DISCOUNTS IN EFFECT ON 
PIPE FITTINGS 

Montreal. 

Quotations on cast and malleable pipe 
fittings have been advanced approxim- 



INCREASED PPTCES ON BAR 
PRODUCTS 

Montreal. 

The firmer tendency in the market 
for bar products, as outlined in recent 
issues of Sanitary Engineer, has result- 
ed in hierher prices on practically all 
lines. Common bar iron is advanced 
twenty cents per 100 'bs., bringing the 
local quotation to $3.35 base. Other 



bars of both iron and steel show a cor- 
responding increase with the exception 
of spring steel and prices on this pro- 
duct are purely nominal and according to 
grade. In announcing the higher quota- 
tion producers state that the advanced 
costs of production are merely taken in- 
to consideration, and there is still a firm 
undertone in the market. Primary mar- 
kets have shown a gradual increasing- 
tendency and for some weeks past mills 
have been announcing advanced levels 
on semi-finished products. Following are 
revised quotations; 

BAR IRON— 

Common bar iron, 100 lbs 3 35 

Refined iron 4 86 

Irish finish machinery steel 3 40 

Mild steel 3 35 

Single reeled machinery steel 5 25 

Band steel 3 85 

Spring steel 5 00 to 8 50 

Sleighshoe steel 3 36 

Tire steel 3 55 

Harrow tooth steel 3 50 

Toe caulk steel 4 26 

Mining tool steel, per lb 19 

Black Diamond tool and cast steel per lb. 19 
NOTE — Refined iron is approximately *1.60 per 
100 lbs. over base, but fluctuates owing to un- 
Mttled market. 

Band steel in scroll bundles, 50c pur J00 lbs 

•xtra. 



GENERAL PRICE INCREASE ON 
WRENCHES 

Montreal. 

An increase of about five per cent, is 
quoted on wrenches, including agricul- 
tural, knife handled, bull dog and alli- 
gator. 



ADVANCED GALVANIZED SHEET 
PRICES IN SOME QUARTERS 

Montreal. 

Following the announcement made by 
importers of English galvanized sheets 
a week or so ago that quotations were 
advanced on English sheets, and owing 
to the firm tendency in other market-s on 
these products, certain local distribu- 
tors are putting into effect slightly 
higher quotations. This revision, while 
not generally quoted as yet, indicates 
the strong tone which remains in the 
market. Galvanized Canada plates in 
smaller boxes are also twenty-five cents 
per box higher. No change is made in 
other lines, and following are prevailing 
prices; 

BLACK SHEETS— 

10 gauge, base 4 215 

12 gauge . . . 4 35 

14 gauge 4 45 

16 gauge 4 55 

18—20 gauge 4 80 

22—24 gauge 4 85 

26 gauge 4 90 

28 gauge 5 10 

GALVANIZED SHEETS— 

Queen's Head Fleur rle Lis 

28 gauge 7 25 7 00 

26 gauge 7 00 6 75 

24 gauge 6 70 6 45 

22 g?uge 6 65 6 40 

18—20 gauge 6 40 6 15 

Other Brands — 

10% oz 7 00 ■ 

28 U. S. base 6 50 

26 U. S. base 6 25 

24—22 gauge 6 10 

20 — 18 gauge 5 90 

16 gauge 5 75 ■ 

Above prices are for % ton lots in English 
iron and 1000 lb. lots in American iron with an 
extra charge n f 25c for less ouanti* ; es. Evt>-a for 
sheets 3 ft. wide, 28 gauge and 10% oz.. 25c. per 
100 lbs. Further extra for sheets 4 ft. wide 
according to gauge. 



February 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



37 



MAY BE HIGHER PRICES ON 
CORRUGATED SHEETS 

Montreal. 

A much firmer tone has now developed 
in the market for corrugated sheets and 
one local manufacturer stated that ad- 
vanced quotations may be reached at an 
early date. It was previously thought 
the stronger tendency in flat sheets 
would not reflect on corrugated for some 
little time owing to the present quiet 
season, but stocks are gradually becom- 
ing depleted and manufacturers will soon 
be forced into the higher market values. 
Following are present list and discount: 

CORRUGATED SHEETS— Per 100 Sq. Ft. 

No. 28 gauge 6 60 

No. 26 gauge 7 00 

No. 26. U. S. gauge 8 00 

No. 24 gauge 9 00 

No. 22 gauge 11 00 

No. 20 gauge 12 50 

No. 18 gauge : 16 50 

Less 10 per cent. 

Lighter than 24 gauge and wider than 27 
inches, 75c. per square extra. 



RADIATOR VALVES HAVE NEW 
DISCOUNTS 

Montreal. 

As stated in last issue, new list prices 
were quoted on radiator valves but up to 
that time local distributors had not 
adopted the new discounts. These are 
now given as 55 and 25 per cent, off new 
list on both standard and removable disc. 
Other lines of valves and bibbs are un- 
changed at the following discounts: 
VALVES — 

Compression work, standard 45% 

Fuller work, standard 30% 

Quick opening compression bibbs 43% 

Bath cocks, quick opening ' 41% 

Bath cocks, compression 41% 

Basin Cocks, quick opening 46% 

Flatway stop and waste cocks, standard 56% 
Roundway stop and waste cocks, standard 56% 

Brass steam cocks, standard, % in 50% 

Radiator valves, standard 55/25% 

Do., removable discs .. ..' 55/25% 

Globe, angle and check valves, standard 25% 

Gate or straightway 25% 

Km eo globe valves 33% 

Bmco check valves 33% 

Jenkins globe, angle, check and swing 

check 10% 

Jenkins gate or straightway . . . . 16% 

Jenkins iron body, globe and angle . . . . 15% 

Jenkins iron body, gate 25% 

N iP. "O" and "S" traps 40% 



BRASS AND COPPER SHEETS ONE 
CENT HIGHER 

Montreal. 

Slightly higher quotations are given 
on brass and tinned copper sheets, both 
lines being increased one cent per pound. 
Other lines such as rods and tubing are 
unchanged. The improved tone of cop- 
per on primary markets has reflected a 
firmer undertone in these products, this 
metal making further slight advances 
during more recent weeks. Following- 
are revised quotations: 
BRASS — Base. 

Sheet, base 25 

Rods, base % to 1 in., round 22 

Tubing, seamless, base 30 

F.o.b. 
COPPER— 

Rods, % to 2 in 29 

Soft sheets, plain, 16 oz. and heavier 30 
Plain tinned, 16 oz. and heavier .... 38 
Polished, and tinned, 16 oz. and 

heavier, lb 41 

Tubing, lb 32 

Above prices are full sheets and bars. Cut 
sheets and bars are 5c. per lb. higher. 



MAY BE HIGHER QUOTATIONS ON 
RANGE BOILERS 

Montreal. 

A very firm tendency is noted in the 
market for range boilers, in line with 
other galvanized products. The strong 
tone in flat sheets has been in evidence 
for seme weeks past, and the difficulty 
in securing ample supplies of heavier 
gauges for the manufacturing boilers is 
becoming more apparent from week to 
week. One local manufacturer stated 
that he would not be surprised if prices 
were forced upwards in the near future. 
Following are present discounts from 
standard list: 
RANGE BOILERS:— 

6 Gallon $13.60 

12 " 14.00 

18 " 16.00 

25 " 16.60 

30 " 17.60 

36 " 20.60 

*° " 22.76 

^ " 38.00 

66 " 60.76 

82 74.00 

J™ . 103.00 

J zo ., 117.00 

}** „ 164.00 

IVi „ 187.00 

210.00 

Std., less 40 per cent ; Ex. Heavy, 30 per cent. 

KEEN COMPETITION IN CLOSET 
COMBINATIONS 

Montreal. 

Although current nominal quotations 
on closet outfits are still unchanged lo- 
cally, an easier tendency continues in the 
market. When discussing the lower pri- 
ces appearing on other domestic mar- 
kets one local distributor stated that in 
all probability a similar development 
would be noted here also in the not far 
distant future. Competition is very 
keen on what little business is showing, 
with rumours of further price-shading, 
while at the same time dealers contend 
that existing levels allow very little pro- 
fit. It is also reported that an easier 
feeling now exists among manufacturers 
and importers, with a possibility of re- 
duced figures at sources of supply. Av- 
erage price levels are: 
CLOSET COMBINATIONS- - 

Low down outfits, each 

Closet, standard outfit, oak 25 00 

Do., post hinge seat 26 00 

Do., oak vitro or Pussyfoot 26 00 

Do., post hinge seat 26 20 

Do., mahogany vitro or Pussyfoot, post 

hinge seat and cover 28 45 

Do., vitreous china, oak post hinge seat 

and cover 28 45 

Do., vitreous china, mahogany post 

hinge seat and cover 29 50 

Do., white Vitro mahogany post hinge seat 

and cover 29 60 

Mahogany post hinge seat and cover .... 28 70 
Do., enamelled iron tank, oak post 

hinge seat and cover 29 50 

Do., enamelled iron tank, oak post hinge 

seat and cover 29 50 

post hinge seat and cover 29 50 

Add for % in valve on suipply pipe... 1 25 

Add for spud 60 

Add for reverse trap bowl l 50 

Add for syphon jet bowl 7 00 

Deduct for supply pipe 80 

Deduct for floor hinge 60 

CLOSET BOWLS — 

Richelieu bowl g 50 

Washdown bowl with spud 10 60 

Reverse trap bowl with spud 11 35 

Syphon jet bowl with spud 16 25 

CLOSET SEATS— 

Oak post hinge seat and cover 3 85 

Oak wood strip seat and cover 3 50 

Mahogany finish post hinge seat and 

cover 4 05 



closet tanks- 
Low down, oak vitro with fittings, less 

seat 12 26 

White vitro or Pussyfoot with fittings, 

flush elbow and supply 15 65 

Vitreous china tank with fittings, flush 

elbow and supply 19 00 

Enamelled iron with fittings, flush 

elbow and supply 16 60 



UNSETTLEMENT AGAIN NOTED IN 
ENAMELLED WARE 

Montreal. 

There are again indications of un- 
settlement on the local market for ena- 
melled ware, after a period of improve- 
ment in this connection. Local supply 
houses state that although trade is only 
of moderate proportions a good percent- 
age of this is only obtainable at a sacri- 
fice in prices, especially larger sized 
orders. It is reported however that some 
arrangement will probably be made in 
the near future in the hope of again 
producing a more stable market. Aver- 
age quotations are unchanged as follows : 
ENAMELED WARE — 
Sinks, roll rim — 

18 x 80 $23 00 

Sinks, flat rim — 1 only 2 only 3 only 

16 x 24 $ 7 60 % 7 40 $ 7 80 

18 x 30 8 70 8 60 8 60 

20 x 30 9 90 9 80 9 70 

Bath tubs, roll rim, 4. 4%, 6 feet, 24 to 

30 in. wide 61 40 

Bath tubs, 6% feet. 67 10 

Lavatories — 

17x19 in. Apron F139 or P4046 16 30 

18x24 in. Apron F164 or PS846 or P8847 23 60 

18x21 in. Apron F169 or P4206 17 60 

17x19 in. Roll rim. F241 or F484B 12 60 

Less 33 1-3 per cent. 



STRENGTH STILL SHOWN IN LEAD 
MARKETS 

Montreal. 

Ingot metal markets continue to show 
a firmer tone, notably lead which regis- 
ters a further sharp advance. The de- 
cline in zinc seems to have ceased, and a 
re-action upwards may follow. Gener- 
ally speaking the outlook may be said to 
be firm. 

TIN. — London has advanced again 
this week and Straits are selling at over 
40 cents in New York for the first time 
in many months. It is considered that 
this metal has acted well in view of dis- 
turbed conditions, but a reaction is of 
course probable. The local market is 
strong at 44% cents'. 

COPPER. — The slight recession in pri- 
ces noted a week or so ago has disap- 
peared, and the market is again firmer. 
Export business is more or less unset- 
tled, but sentiment remains bullish and 
producers are in some cases declining 
to quote for forward deliveries. Should 
there by any sign of a settlement of the 
trouble in Germany prices would in all 
probability respond rapidly. Prices are 
firm at 18 cts. for electro, 17% cts. for 
casting. 

LEAD. — Lead is showing remarkable 
strength with East St. Louis quoted at 
over 8 cts., while the London market has 
also advanced sharply. Consumption is 
very heavy in the U. S. A. and supplies 
are comparatively scarce over the next 
few months. Local market is firm at 
8% cts. 



38 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



February 1, 1923 



SPELTER.— The American market 
has been sagging during the past few 
weeks, with a light demand and a cessa- 
tion of export business. A firmer tone 
has now developed and it is thought 
likely that prices will again advance, 
especially as domestic buying has been 



light recently. Market locally is steady 
at 9% cents. 

ANTIMONY.— The Chinese situation 
remains very firm and offerings from 
there are limited. Demand is only fair, 
but prices locally have stiffened some- 
what and stocks are light. English is 
quoted at 8 cts., Chinese at 7V2 cts. 



Toronto Markets 



TORONTO, January 30. — The majority of current price revis- 
ions in sanitary and heating materials are again in an upward 
direction. The only reduction affects closet seats and tanks, 
this change falling into line with the recent downward revision on 
closet combinations. Price increases affect radiation pipe fittings 
and pig iron. Both cast and malleable fittings are quoted higher 
through the issuing of new discounts, while bushings, unions and 
plugs are also affected. Radiators are revised all through the list, 
but boilers maintain former levels. Higher prices have also mater- 
ialized on cotton wastes. The new discount on radiator valves and 
union elbows is 55 and 25 per cent. An upward tendency is still 
evident on many products, including sheets, brass and copper and 
tubing. 



advanced prices materialize 
on cotton wastes 

Toronto. 

As previously foreshadowed in Sani- 
tary Engineer, some higher prices have 
now developed on cotton wastes. The 
extent of this further increase is ap- 
proximately one cent per pound on the 
various grades of both white and colored. 
Cream polishing, however, is advanced 
two cents. This revision is attributed 
to the strength of raw materials, chief- 
ly accentuated by the climb of cotton in 
general. Following are new quotations: 

COTTON WASTES — 

Cream, polishing °] 

White. XXX p 21 

Do., XX 18 

Do., X 17 

Do., XC 15 1 /, 

Do., XXX extra 18 

Do., XX grand 17 

Do., LCR 16 

Do., X empire 

Do., X press 13 " 

Colored, No. 1 14V* 

Do.. No. 17 : 1S% 

Do., No. 1A 12 1 /> 

Do., No. IB 11% 

Do., Fancy 15 

Do., Lion 13y 2 

Do.. Standard 12 

Do., Popular 10 

Do., Keen 08 

Above lines subject to trade discount for quan- 
tity. 



with the exception of the following 
points which take discounts one point 
lower than those given herewith: — Lon- 
don, Windsor, Sarnia, Amherstburg, 
Walkerville, Sandwich, Ford City, Ot- 
tawa and Hull, Que-. 

RADIATORS — 

Revised radiator list prices are for 1, 2, 3, 4 
and 5-column radiators per squiare foot. 

38 in., $1; 32 in., $1.10; 30 in., $1.15; 26 in., 
$1.20; 23 in., $1.26; 22 in., $1.30; 20 in., $1.36; 
18 in., $1.40; 16 in., $1.50; 14 in., $1.55; 13 in., 
$1.60. 

Discount on 2, 3, 4 and 5 column standard 
sizes, 51 per cent, for water and 52 per cent, for 
steam. 

Discount on 1-column standard size, and 2, 3, 
and 4-column hospital sizes 43 per cent, for water 
and 44 per cent, for steam. 

Discounts on 1-column hospital size, water 29 
per cent; steam, 30 per cent. 

Wall radiators — 5 ft., $1.15 ; 6 ft.. $1.10; 7 
ft., $1.05; 9 ft., $1.05; 12 ft., $1.05. Discount 43 
per cent. 
BOILERS — 
Water: 

Round 60 per cent, off list. Square 20 per 
cent, off list. 
Steam : 

Round, 25 per cent, off list ; Square, 15 per 
cent, off list. 



UPWARD REVISION IN RADIATOR 
PRICE LEVELS 

Toronto. 

Quotations on radiation are now placed 
on a higher basis through a revision in 
discounts. The extent of the change is 
four points, that is, the discounts on 
standard radiators which was formerly 
55 per cent, for water and 56 for steam 
are now 51 for water and 52 for steam. 
Changes of similar extent are made all 
through the list, with the exception of 
boilers, where no revision is recorded. 
The strength of the market has been 
pointed out in former market reports. 
Following are the revised quotations 
which apply in Ontario, f. o. b., factory, 



DISCOUNT OF 55 AND 25 ON RAD- 
IATOR VALVES 

Toronto. 

Following the issuing of the new price 
list on radiator valves and union elbows, 
which was reproduced in a former issue 
of Sanitary Engineer, uniform discounts 
applying to this list have now been gen- 
erally adopted by local distributors. The 
new level is 55 and 25 per cent. In the 
last issue it was pointed out that a var- 
iety of discounts were being quoted, 
some around 60 per cent, off, others 50 
and 10, and again 50 and 10 and 10. 



REVISED QUOTATIONS ON CLOSET 
TANKS AND SEATS 

Toronto. 

Closet tanks and closet seats are now 
changed in price, these revisions corres- 
ponding to the new lower prices recent- 
ly announced on closet combinations. 
The extent of the changes, however, are 



moderate, the quotations now in effect 
being as follows: — 

CLOSET COMBINATIONS - Each 
Oak, Wood Tank, Oak W. S. Seat and Cover 24 00 
Oak Vitro Tank, Oak W.S. ^eat and Cover 24 00 
Oak Pi rf.yfoot Tank, Oak W S. Seat ;uid 

Cover 24 00 

Oak Wood Tank Oak P.H , Tf at and Cov.v 24 50 
Oak Vitro Tank. Oak P.H. Stat and Covjr 2t 50 
White Vitro Oak Woodstrip Seat and Cover 24 50 
White, Pussyfoot Oak Woodstiip, Seat and 

Cover 25 50 

White Pussyfoot, Woodstrip Seat and Cover 25 50 
White Vitro Tank, Mahog., P.H. Seat and 

Cover >-. . 26 50 

White Pussyfoot, Mahog., P.H. Seat and 

Cover 26 50 

White Vitro or Pussyfoot, oak, P.H. Seat 

and Cover 26 00 

Mahog. Pussyfoot, Mahogany P.H., Seat and 

Cover 27 00 

Vitreous China Tank, Oak P.H.. Seat and 

Cover 27 00 

Enam. Iron Tank. Oak P.H. Seat and Cover 28 75 
Vitreous China Tank, Mahog., P.H. Seat 

and Cover 29 00 

Enam. Iron Tank, Mahog., P.H., Seat and 

Cover 28 75 

ADDITIONS OR REDUCTIONS ON ABOVE— 
If supplied less bend or offset, deduct. . 50 
If suplpied with reverse trap bowl, add 1 1 '50 
If supplied with BOT Reverse Trap bowl 

Add 2 25 

If supplied with plain syphon jet bowl 

Add 7 00 

If supplied with N.P. stock cock on sup- 
ply Pipe, Add 1 50 

If supplied less brass and rubber floor 

flange and bolts, Deduct 60 

If supplied less bend or offset, deJuct. . 50 
If supplied less N. P. supply pipe d?Juct 70 
CLOSET BOWLS— 

Washdown bowl with spud 10 60 

Reverse trap bowl, with spud 12 10 

Syphon jet bowl, with spud 17 00 

"Richelieu" bowl 10 50 

CLOSET TANKS— LOW DOWN— 

Oak wood, Tank and inside fittings with 

bend and supply 13 20 

Mahog. Wood Tank, and inside Fittings 

with bend and supply 15 40 

Oak Vitro or Pussyfoot Tank and inside 

Fittings with bend and supply 13 45 

White Vitro or Pussyfoot Tank and Inside 

Fittings with bend and supply 13 40 

White Enam. Tank F.-585 or P.926-2, or 
White Vitreous China Belmeade Tank 

with fittings (as above) 18 00 

CLOSET SEATS— 

Oak Rich. Seat and Cover to wall 3 50 

Oak Woodstrip Seat and Cover with bolts 3 50 
Oak Woodstrip Seat less Cover with bolts 2 90 

Oak Post Hinge Seat and Cover 3 85 

Mahog. Fin. Post Hinge Seat and Cove.- 4 7c 



STOVE FOUNDRYMEN GET WAGE 
INCREASE 

Toronto. 

Among the reasons advanced by stove 
and furnace manufacturers for the re- 
cent advance in prices on these products 
was the fact that wage- levels in the 
manufacturing end of the industry had 
advanced. This was stated to be in ad- 
dition to the higher trend of raw ma- 
terial prices. At a conference of On- 
tario stove foundrymen, members of the 
International Molders' Union were 
granted a wage increase of approximate- 
ly 16 per cent. Men who formerly re- 
ceived $5.40 per day of 8 hours will now 
receive $6. 



QUOTATIONS ON PIPE FITTINGS 
REVISED UPWARDS 

Toronto. 

As outlined in former issues of Sani- 
tary Engineer, revised quotations have 
now appeared on the market for pipe 
fittings. Revisions have been made all 
along the list, thus placing quotations 
upon a higher level. The advance varies 
to some extent, but is chiefly in the 
neighbourhood of seven per cent. Both 
cast iron and malleable fittings are 



February 1, 1<)23 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND StEAMFITTER 



39 



changed, as well as bushings, unions and 
plug's. Following are the revised quo- 
tations: — 

PIPE FITTINGS — Per Cent. 

Cast iron fittings standard 22 

Do., extra heavy 26 

Plugs, cast iron 22 

Do., solid 22 

Do., countersunk 22 

Bushings, malleable 25 

Do., cast 2'5 

Unions, *4 in. to 2 in 40 

Do., % in., 2% to 4 in 40 

Flanged unions, std 22 

Flanged Fittings 27 % 

Dart unions, blk., Vi to 2 in 34 

Do., Vs in., 2*4 to 4 in 23 

Do., galvd., add to black 30 

Nipples, blk., and galvd. Vs to 4 in. 

close and short 55 

Do., 4% in. and larger 45 

Do., long, 's >n. to 4 in GO 

Do., 4% in. and larger < 50 

Do., running thread 35 

Couplings, 4 in. and under 25 

Do., 4 1 /2 in. and larger B 

MALLEABLE FITTINGS— 

New piece list, effective June 1, 1922. 
1 in elbow, $0.32, $0.53 ; 2 in. el'bow. $1.05, 
$1.70: 1 in. tee $0.43, $0.70; 2 in. tee, $1.45, 
$2.40; I in. coupling, $0.33, $0.53; 1 in. locknut 
$0.15. $0.23. Discounts — Less 68 per cent. 



to the market. There has been some 
consideration of pig iron being stored 
against a possible coal strike in April 
next, but the possibility of such labor 
disturbances has now subsided, and the 
necessity for hoarding supplies has 
therefore diminished. 



MAY BE REVISION IN VALVE 
DISCOUNTS 

Toronto. 

A revision towards higher price levels 
on certain lines of brass compression 
work is considered possible in the near 
future, according to current opinion on 
local markets. It is noted that quota- 
tions on iron body and brass valves are 
being revised upward in the United 
States, and a covering of future re- 
quirements by local distributors is taken 
as an indication that a similar move- 
ment may possibly develop on domestic 
centres. Up to the present no changes 
have been made from the following dis- 
counts : 

VALVES— Per cent 

Compression work, standard 45 

Fuller work, standard 30 

Bath cocks, compression 4) 

Do., Fuller 25 

Flatway stop and wastceocks, stand'd.. 56 
Brass steam cocks, standard Vz" to 2" 50 

Co., 2%" to 3" 43 

Globe, angle and check valves, std 25 

Mueller globe, angle and check 25 

Mueller composition disc steam valves . . 33 

J.M.T. valves, screwed 101 10 

J.M.T. gate valves, screwed 16 10 

Jenkins gate or straightway, screwed. ... 16 1 10 

Jenkins, globe, screwed lOjlO 

Radiator valves, standard 55-25% 

Do., removable disc 1:5-25% 

Emco, J. D.. rad. valves, screwed 33 

Emco swing check, %" and 40 

Do., other sizes 33 

Webber gate valves, screwed 33 

Emco globe valves, std 25 

Emco globe valves, J.D., screwed 33 

Basin Cocks — 

No. and 1 Fuller pattern 30 

Quick opening No. 3633 50 

No. 3623, plain or index handle 34 



PIG IRON PRICES AGAIN RECORD 
ADVANCE 

Toronto. 

Pig iron prices have taken another up- 
ward step, the extent of this current in- 
crease being one dollar per ton. This 
revision brings the prevailing local level 
to $33.55. This is the third advance dur- 
ing the last few weeks. The movement 
is attributed in some quarters to in- 
creased buying in primary centres. On 
the other hand, the fact that pig iron is 
not offered for sale so freely as formerly 
has added a certain element of strength 



BOILER TUBES MAY REACH 
SLIGHTLY HIGHER LEVELS 

Toronto. 

The upward tendency which has pre- 
vailed in the boiler tube market during 
recent weeks is considered likely to re- 
sult in slightly higher price levels being- 
announced in the near future. This re- 
vision is stated by local distributors to 
be in line with current advances taking 
place in the primary markets. It is 
stated that new domestic quotations are 
under consideration in some quarters. 
On the other hand, the degree of im- 
provement in this direction is described 
as hampered to some extent through the 
liquidation of stocks. As soon as these 
are disposed of, higher replacement val- 
ues are expected to become effective. 

BOILER TUBES— 

Size Seamless. La^vveld 

% inch $19 00 $ 

1 inch 20 00 

1% inch 22 00 

li/o inch 24 00 

1% inch 24 00 23 00 

2 inch 22 00 19 00 

2Yi inch 24 00 2>1 50 

2Yo inch 27 00 23 50 

3 inch 34 00 28 50 

3% inch 36 00 33 00 

3% inch 38 00 33 00 

4 inch 50 00 42 00 



WROUGHT PIPING CONTINUES ON 
FIRM BASIS 

Toronto. 

While list No. 57 continues to govern 
the domestic wrought iron pipe markets, 
yet quotations remain on a very firm 
basis. It is pointed out that genuine 
wrought iron in the United States has 
shown an appreciable advance in price, 
but steel has not increased to the same 
extent, although basic conditions are 
described as very strong. This tendency 
is also reflected in domestic circles. 

WROUGHT PIPE 
Price List No. 57. November, 1922. 

Standard Buttweld Pipe S/C 
Per 100 ft. 

Steel Gen. Wrot. Iron 
31k. Galv. Blk. Galv. 

Size 

Vs in 6.00 8.00 

% in 3.96 6.00 7.20 9.30 

% in 3.96 6.00 7.20 9.30 

% in 5.02 6.55 7.31 8.93 

% in 6.10 7.82 8.86 10.70 

1 in 8.67 11.22 12.75 15.47 

1% in 11.73 15.18 17.25 20.93 

IV. in 14.03 18.15 20.63 25.03 

2 in 18.87 24.42 27.75 33.67 

2V" in 29.84 38.61 

3 in 39.02 50.49 

31/2 in 50.60 64.40 

4 in 59.95 76.30 

Standard Lapweld Pipe S/C 
Per 100 feet. 

Blk. Galv. Blk. Galv. 

Steel Gen. Wrot. Iron 

2 in 22.20 27.75 31.08 37.00 

2Y 2 in 32.76 41.54 46.80 56.16 

3 in 42.84 54.32 61.20 73.44 

3% in ■ 51.52 65.32 73.60 88.32 

4 in 61.04 77.39 87.20 104.64 

4% in 71.12 90.17 *1.07 1.27 

5 in 82.88 105.08 1.24 1.48 

6 in 1.08 1.36 1.61 1.92 

7 in 1.40 1.79 2.07 2.50 

8L in 1.48 1.88 2.18 2.63 

g i n 1.70 2.16 2.51 3.02 

q in ' 2.07 2.62 2.97 3.59 

101, i n 1.92 2.43 2.82 3.39 

10 in 2.47 3.13 3.63 4.37 



EARLY BUILDING BRINGS CALL 
FOR ENAMELED WARE 

Toronto. 

Although some price revisions have 
appeared on closet tanks and seats, no 
variations are made in prices on enam- 
eled ware products. These are being 
maintained at the levels quoted below, 
with the general situation described as 
fair for this season of the year. Whether 
revised quotations will develop in the 
near future is considered problematic in 
some quarters, it being pointed out that 
while another brisk season is being an- 
ticipated in building circles, some ru- 
mors of price shading have been ap- 
parent in certain districts. 

ENAMELED WARE — 

'Enameled Iron Baths, 3" roll rim, 4 ft,. 

4 ft. 6 in., 5 ft 51 40 

Do., 5y 2 ft 57 10 

Lavatories — 

17x10" Apron F139 or P4045 15 30 

18x24" Apron F154 or P3845 or P3847 23 60 

18x21" Apron F169 or P4205 17 60 

18x21" Roll Rim, F197, F199 or 

P4655-6 15 40 

17x19" Roll Rim, F241 or P4345 12 60 

Sinks, Roll Rim, 16x24 in 18 10 

Do., 18 x 30 in 23 00 

Do., 20 x 30 in 24 70 

Sinks, Flat Rim— 3 only 2 only 1 only 

16x24 f7 60 $7 70 $7 80 

18x30 8 50 8 60 8 70 

20x30 9 70 9 80 9 90 

Above prices, list, less 33 1-3 per cent. 



FIRM UNDERTONE NOTED IN 
RANGE BOILERS 

Toronto. 

The strength of galvanized sheets and 
the upward tendency of the market has 
been reflected to some extent in the 
finished products, including range boil- 
ers. These are described as being on a 
very firm basis, with the recently re- 
vised quotations being firmly main- 
tained. Current trade is described as 
good for this time of the year. Lists 
and discounts remain as follows: 
RANGE BOILERS— 

Size l^ist Price 

6-gallon 513 60 

12 to 15 gallon 14 00 

IS-gallon 15 00 

25-gallon 16 50 

30-gallon 17 50 

35-gallon 20 50 

JC-gallon 22 76 

f,2-gallon 38 00 

66-Eitllon 60 76 

82-galion 7 * 00 

100-gailon 108 00 

120-gallon 117 00 

144-gallon 1«* 00 

168-gallon I8 7 00 

192-gallon 210 00 

Discounts, Standard weight, 40 per cent. 
Extra heavy, 30 per cent. 



EARLY TRADE FOR SOIL PIPE AND 
FITTINGS 

Toronto. 

Early anticipations for trade in soil 
pipe and fittings are now apparent, this 
being one of the results of more or less 
extensive building programs 'for the 
coming season. The demand is described 
as generally good for this time of the 
year and quotations remain unchanged 
at the following levels: 
SOIL PIPE— 

2 inch Less 33 1-3% 

3 inch Less 33 1-3% 

4 inch Less 33 1-3% 

5 and 6 inch Less 33 1-3% 

8 inch net 

SITTINGS — 

2 to 6 inch Less 45 per cent. 

8 inch fittings net. 



1(1 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February l, 1923 



I AIR TRADE IN LEAD AND ZINC 
PRODUCTS 

Toronto. 

Lead and zinc goods present a fairly 
steady market tone, there having- been 
no change in current local quotations on 
these lines. Business at present is de- 
scribed as good for the early weeks of 
the year, and this has enabled the mar- 
ket to hold fts own through the custom- 
ary quiet trade session. Lead in prim- 
ary metal centres is again strengthen- 
ing and some slight price advances have 
been recorded on pig lead. This revision, 
however, is not considered of sufficient 
extent to affect the finished products as 
yet. Unchanged quotations on solders, 
etc., follow: 

LEAD AND ZINC GOODS— 

Lead pipe, list, per lb 14 

Lead waste pipe, list, per lb 15 

Do., over 8 in., list, per lb 16 

Lead pipe is subject to a discount of ten per 
cent. 

Lead traps and bends, less 15 per cent. 
Lead sheets, 4 to G lbs., sq. ft. in rolls, lb. 
$0.09y 2 — 0.10. 

Cut sheets, %c to %c lb. extra and cut 
sheets to size, lc lb. extra. 



Solder wire, per lb SI 

Do., commercial, lb *..... 25 

Do., strictly, lb 23 y 2 

Do., guaranteed, lb 26% 

Do., wiping, lb 23% 

Zinc sheets, per lb Oil 12 



ANTICIPATE BUSY SEASON IN 
EAVESTROUGH 

Toronto. 

Quotations on eavestrough and con- 
ductor piping remain at the recently re- 
vised levels quoted in former lists. A 
firm tone prevails in these products, the 
market being described' .^s unusually 
strong and active for this season of the 
year. Distributors are anticipating an- 
other active period, |as prospects for 
early construction work are considered 
very bright. Following are prevailing 
local quotations: 

TROUGH (EAVB) — 
O. G. Square Bead — 

Per 100 ft. Per 100 ft. 

8 inch $15 90 15 inch 34 50 

10 inch .. . . 17 70 18 inch 44 00 

12 inch 21 20 

O. G. Round and Half Round 

» inch 16 90 15 inch 35 50 

10 inch 18 70 18 inch 45 00 

12 inch 22 20 

Less 70 per cent. 
PIPE (CONDUCTOR) — 

Plain, round or corrugated. 

Per 100 ft. in 10 ft. lengths. 

2 in., in 10 ft. lengths, list 18 40 

3 in., in 10 ft. lengths, list 22 30 

4 in., in 10 ft. lengths, list 29 60 

5 in., in 10 ft. lengths, list 48 00 

6 in., in 10 ft. lengths 58 80 

Less 70 per cent. 
ELBOWS (CONDUCTOR) — 



2 inch, list 6 25 

3 inch, list 6 00 

4 inch, list 10 50 

5 inch, list 24 00 

6 inch, list 29 00 



Less 60 per cent. 



MAY ELIMINATE RANGE IN BAR 
IRON PRICES 

Toronto. 

Effective from February 1, certain 
local distributors state they are revising 
bar iron price levels upward to the ex- 
tent of fifteen' cents per cwt., through 
eliminating the lower figure of $3.25. 
This change would place the average 
quotation at $3.40 base. Shapes and 
angle iron may also be changed accord- 



ingly. This movement is not uniform, 
however, but has been foreshadowed in 
former issues and would come as no sur- 
prise owing to the recent strength dis- 
played in primary markets, which has 
been more or less reflected in domes- 
tic steel circles. While easier levels are 
still recorded on eastern centres, it is 
pointed out that such quotations do not 
represent current replacement values, 
and a similar movement here is also ex- 
pected in the near future. The general 
conclusion that there will be no coal 
strike on April 1 has not resulted in any 
weakening in the general position. The 
steel market is gaining strength, as re- 
gards prices ruling, and it stated that 
whatever influence the improved coal 
outlook may have had, it has been over- 
come by the stronger position of mills. 



IRON AND STEEL— 

Mild steel bars, base 3 25 3 40 

Mild steel bands, 3-16 base ... 3 75 3 90 

Bar iron, base 3 25 3 40 

Angle, iron base 3 35 3 50 

Horseshoe iron 3 90 

Tire steel : 3 50 

Snring steel 7 00 8 00 

Sleigh shoe steel 3 40 

Cold rawn steel '. 4 50 

Toe cnullc iron 4 10 

Hoop Steel 4 75 

Norway iron 12 50 

Crucible cast sheet steel 28 00 

Mining Drill steel 18 50 

Cast tool steel, high grade 30 00 

Cast tool steel, medium 18 00 



FIRMING TENDENCY IN SHEET 
MARKETS 

Toronto. 

Former predictions regarding the 
firming tendency in the sheet markets 
are now being borne out by recent de- 
velopments in primary centres, where 
prices heretofore quoted by the Steel 
Corporation are now withdrawn, it be- 
ing generally expected that an advance 
is imminent. Current Business is de- 
scribed as exceptionally brisk for this 
season of the year, and forward book- 
ings indicate to some extent the confi- 
dence in the market. Unchanged local 
quotations follow: 
GALVANIZED SHEETS- 

Premier and Apollo 



10% oz 6 66 

U. S. 28 base 6 25 

U. S. 26 base 6 95 

22 and 24 5 80 

18 and 20 5 65 

16 5 60 

12 and 14 5 35 

Queen's Head 

28 gauge base 7 15 

26 6 76 ' 

24 6 45 

22 6 30 

Fleur de Lis 

28 gauge, base 6 90 

26 6 50 

24 6 20 

22 6 05 



An extra 40c. per 100 lbs. is charged for Key- 
stone and Premier bands copper-bearing sheets. 

An extra is now charged on galvanized sheets. 
10% oz. and 28 ga., when shipped out in sheets 
3 feet wide. The extra charged over prices shown 
in 20c. per 100 pounds. 
BLUE ANNEALED SHEETS — 



10 gauge, base 4 20 

12 gauge 4 25 

14 gauge 4 30 

16 gauge 4 35 

BLACK SHEETS— 

18-20 gauge 4 90 

22-24 gawge 4 95 

26 gauge , 5 00 

28 gauge 5 10 



A charge of 25c. per 100 lbs. is made for less 
than case lots. An extra 10c. per 100 lbs. is 
also charged on sheets 26 in. wide. 



FAIR VOLUME IN BRASS AND 
COPPER 

Toronto. 

The basic metals entering into the 
production of brass and copper goods, 
such as rods, tubing and sheets, are ap- 
parently attempting to climb up again. 
While this movement has been of a minor 
extent up to the present, it is described 
as the forerunner to general improve- 
ment in these products. Current busi- 
ness is also very good, that is for this 
time ' of the year. Quotations on these 
lines remain unchanged, as follows: 



BRASS — 

Sheets, base, per lb 26 

Rods, base, per lb 23 

Tubing, base, per lb 31 

COPPER— 

Rods, base, per lb.. 29 

Soft sheets, plain. 16 oz. and heavier, lb. 30 
Do., plain tinned, 16 oz. and heavier, 

per lb 43 

Do., polishing, 16 oz. and heavier, lb. 36 

Tubing 34 

Copper, bus bars, base 29 



SCRAP RUBBER PRICES ALSO 
CLIMB UPWARD 

Toronto. 

In the waste material markets, scrap 
rubbers have maintained their steady 
tone, with prices on an upward trend, 
due to further advances in crude rubber. 

Scrap metals have just about been 
holding their own. Most demand is still 
for red and yellow grades. The white 
metals are moving in a fair way. 

Consuming demand is still hand-to- 
mouth in scrap iron, but steadily ex- 
panding. Higher prices are asked. 

The following are the usual average 
of dealers' buying prices for large 



quantities: 

SCRAP MATERIALS— 

Scrap Iron 

Heavy melting steel 11 00 

Scrap pipe 6 00 

Steel turnings 10 00 

Malleable scrap 10 50 

Rails scrap 11 00 

Net tons — 

No. 1 cast 18 00 

Stove plate 14 50 

Car wheels (std) 14 00 

Scrap Metals 

Heavy copper wire 11 25 

Light copper 9 25 

No. 1 composition 9 00 

Red brass turnings 7 00 

Light brass 4 00 

Heavy yellow brass 5 00 

Heavy lead 4 50 

Tea lead 3 0O 

Scrap zinc 4 00 

Scrap Rubber 

Boots and shoes 2 50 3 00 

High rubber boots 1 75 2 OP 

Auto tires 25 50 

Solid tires 75 1 0O 



STRONG UNDERTONE IN CORRU- 
GATED SHEETS 

Toronto. 

As an indication of the strength under- 
lying the current trend of corrugated 
sheets, it is pointed out that, "English 
mills last year were selling No. 24 gauge 
corrugated sheets, which they regard as 
a sort of standard at about £15 sterling, 
and now they are firm at £18 with an ad- 
vance of 30 cents in the cost of a pound 
sterling to a Canadian buyer; all of 
which has a very stimulating tendency 
towards firmness in domestic markets." 
While present trading is quiet, another 
(Continued on page 42) 



February 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



41 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 



Mueller 

H inch Waste 
and Overflow 

A-2435 

This Mueller connection, 
because of several late im- 
provements in construc- 
tion, can be installed much 
quicker than any other 
make. The waste elbow 
and overflow are cast brass, 
overflow strainer is cast and 
the waste strainer is of 
heavy wrought brass. 

Toronto By-law Requires 
r/2 inch Waterway 

Toronto City By-law 
demands that IV2 in. waste 
and overflow be used, as 
being perfect in construc- 
tion, capable of the best ser- 
vice and entirely satisfac- 
tory in every way. 

Correct designs, the right 
raw materials and a fine 
precision in workmanship, 
make Mueller Brass Goods 
stand every test and give 
dependable and enduring 
service. 

Write for catalogue and 
prices. Mail orders given 
immediate attention. 

H. MUELLER MFG. CO.. LTD. 
SARNIA. ONT. 

Water, Plumbing and Gas 
Brass Goods and Tools 

American Factory at Decatur, 111., U. S. A. 
Branches, New York and San Francisco 

Mueller Metals Co.. Port Huron. Mich.. Makers of "Red Tip" 
Brass Rod: Brass and Copper Tubing; Forgings and Castings 
in Brass. Bronze and Aluminum; Die Castings in White Metat 
and Aluminum; also Screw Machined Products. 



nun 



The unknown brand is probably second grade — buy advertised lines. 



42. 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



February 1, 1923, 



j ; 

season of brisk activity is generally an- 
ticipated with the arrival of spring 
weather. 



CORRUGATED SHEETS— Per 100 Sq. rx. 





' 6 


6'0 






00 




8 


00 




9 


00 




11 


00 






60 






60 


Less 10 per cent. 






Lighter than 24 grauee and 


wider than 


27 



inches, ?0. 75 per square extra. 



TIN PLATE MAKERS LOOK FOR 
ADVANCE 

Toronto. 

It is foreshadowed in certain quarters 
that there may be an upward revision in 
tin plate prices in the near future. Pro- 
ducers in southern fields claim that ow- 
ing to rising costs they are hardly 
breaking even at existing levels. Cur- 
rent domestic quotations are considered 



strong. 

PLATES. CANADA— Per box 

Ordinary, 52 sheets 4 90 

Dull, 60 sheets 5 00 

Blued and oiled, boxes 52's 5 50 

Do., boxes, 6'0's 5 60 

WELSH CANADA PLATES— 

Cold polished, 18 x 24, 60's 6 25 

Cold polished, 18 x 24, 60's 6 50 

PLATES, COKE TIN— 

IC, 20 x 28, 112 sheets 12 75 

IX, 20 x 28, 112 sheets 15 00 

IX. 20 x 28, 56 sheets 8 50 

PLATES, CHARCOAL UN- 
IX, 20 x 28, 112 sheets 10 00 

IXX. 20 x 28 . 56 sheets 12 00 

PLATES. TERNX— 

IC, 14 x 20, 112 sheets 12 00 



REACTION HAS DEVELOPED IN 
INGOT COPPER 

Toronto. 

Lead and antimony have recorded 
slight price advances in the ingot metal 
markets. The general undertone, how- 
ever, remains steady, in the non^jlerrous 
group, with the exception of copper. In 
this metal another reaction has de- 
veloped. 

COPPER. — A reactionary movement 
has been the feature of the copper mar- 
kets. There has developed a break in 
sterling exchange which resulted in cor- 
responding easier prices, and a reluc- 
tancy to trade. Business is described as 
dull and inquiries are light. Domestic 
price levels remain fundamentally un- 
changed. 

TIN. — This market remains steady, al- 
though some slightly lower prices have 
developed in primary centres. Fair- 
sized purchases are being made by con- 
sumers, which degree of trading serves 
to keep up interest. Local tin prices are 
firm at the levels given below, with some 
slightly higher quotations appearing in 
certain quarters. 

LEAD.— This metal continues in a 
strong position, both in primary and 
domestic markets. Local price levels 
have risen in proportion, the increase, 
however, being of minor extent. The 
trend of the market is described as up- 
ward owing to limited offerings. 

SPELTER.— There is^io outstanding 
development in zinc. The markets are 
described as moderate at present, with 
the general situation unchanged. Quo- 
tations are reported a shade easier in 
primary centres, but local figures remain 
unchanged. 



ANTIMONY. — Quotations locally have 
recorded a slight advance, but current 
trading shows no unusual feature this 
week. The general tone is described as 
steady. The current tendency is con- 
sidered steady to firm. 

ALUMINUM. — Business in aluminum 
is said to be improving, especially in 
primary markets. Forward bookings are 
reported in good volume, with a stronger 



undertone consequently evident. Some 
rumors of further price advances pend- 
ing are noted, but no changes have de- 
veloped up to the present. 

INGOT METALS— 



Copper 17 25 

Tin • « 00» 

Lead • 7 76 

Spelter 9 50 

Antimony 9 00 

Aluminum 22 00 



Winnipeg Markets 

WINNIPEG, January 30. — A lengthy budget of price revisions 
is recorded on plumbing and steam-fitting supplies. Higher 
price levels are noted on range boilers and cotton waste. Lever 
handle throttle valves, and Lunkenheimer valves show a slight de- 
cline. Compression bibbs, sill cocks, injectors and basin, pantry 
and compression bath cocks are also quoted at lower levels. 



LEVER HANDLED THROTTLE 
VALVES AT LOWER DIS- 
COUNTS 

Winnipeg. • 

New discounts are in effect on Lun- 
kenheimer relief safety and lever 
handled throttle valves. Throttle valves 
are quoted at 14 per cent, advance, re- 
lief valves at 9 per cent, and safety 
valves at 16 per cent. 



LUNKENHEIMER VALVES SHOW 
DECLINE 

Winnipeg. 

A decline in discounts has also been 
recorded in Lunkenheimer valves. Fol- 
lowing are the latest quotations. 

LUNKENHEIMER VALVES— 

No. 140 32% Adv. 

No. 141 32% Adv. 

No. 144 11% 

No. 145 11% 

No. 145% net list. 

No. 146 and 147 35% Adv. 

No. 148H, 148V, 148A, % to % in. 49% Adv. 

1 to 2 in 35% Adv. 

No. 149, Y" to % in 17% Adv. 

1 to 2 in : 12y 2 % Adv. 

No 142. Yi to % in 34% Adv. 

. 1 to 3 in 25% Adv. 

No. 143, y 2 to % in 29% Adv. 

1 to 4 in 17% Adv. 



DURO BLOW OFF VALVES AT 
LOWER LEVELS 

Winnipeg. 

Lower discounts are in effect on Duro 
blow off valves. Latest discount is plus 
55 per cent. 



REVISED PRICES ON LUNKEN- 
HEIMER INJECTORS 

Winnipeg. 

There has been a revision in discounts 
on Lunkenheimer injectors and injector 
repairs. Lunkenheimer injectors are 
quoted at 59 per cent, and repairs at 4 
per cent. 



COMPRESSION BIBBS SHOW REVI- 
SION IN DISCOUNT 

Winnipeg. 

Compression bibbs show a revision in 
discount and are quoted at less 45 per 
cent, off list price. 



SILL COCKS AT LOWER DISCOUNTS 

Winnipeg. 

Sill cocks, wash trays, bibbs, boiler 
drain cocks, compression stops and stop 
and waste cocks show a decline in dis- 



counts. The following lines are quoted 
as follows; 
SILL COCKS— 

Nos. 835 and 835'^.— discount price .. 50% 
WASH TRAY BIBBS— 

No. 836, discount price 49% 

BOILER DRAIN COCKS— 

No. 837. each 80 

compression stops- 
no. 825, discount price 45% 

No. 826, discount price 37% 

No. 827, discount price 37% 

GROUND KEY COCKS— 

Discount price 40% 

STOP AND WASTE COCKS— 

No. 839, discount price 37% 

No. 839A, discount price . . 65% 



COTTON WASTE SHOWS AN AD- 
VANCE 

Winnipeg. 

There has been an advance in quota- 
tions on cotton waste and the following 
are quoted as follows: — 
cotton waste- 
no. NEH, full bales, per bale $17 25 

Broken quantities, per lb 18*4 

No. REM, full bales, per lb 2(1 

Broken quantities, per lb 21 

Colored, full bales, per bale 14 75 

Broken quantities, per lb .. 15% 

Wool waste, colored, full bales, per lb. . 20 
Broken quantities, per lb 21 



RANGE BOILERS AT ADVANCED 
PRICE LEVELS 

Winnipeg. 

As stated in the previous issue manu- 
facturers had advanced their prices on 
galvanized range boilers and as whole- 
salers istocks are now absorbed, new 
arrivals are quoted at $11.85 for 30 gal- 
lon. 



COMPRESSION BATH COCKS SHOW 
SLIGHT DECLINE 

Winnipeg. 

There is a slight decline in quotations 
on basin, pantry and compression bath 
cocks and the following quotations are 
now in effect. 

BASIN COCKS— 

No. 804, per doz ... .. .. ..$19 80 

No. 800. per doz : ..17 40 

No. 804 V>, less discount .. 50% 

No. 804%, each 2 05 

No. 805. per doz 24 30 

No. 806, less discount '. .. .. 42% 

pantry cocks- 
no. 812, less discount 32% 

COMPRESSION BATH COCKS— 

No. 817, each $ 3 88 

No. 818, each 4.68: 

No. 818A, each 3 43 

No. 818B, each 4 25. 

No. 819, less discount 52%, 

No. 819A, less discount 52% 



February 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



43 




Three Times 

As Big 
As It Looks 



That is, three times bigger in heat-giv- 
ing qualities. This bigness comes from 
the corrugated crown plate, which has 
three times the fire surface that a flat 
one has. 

No wonder the Burnham is such an 
economical boiler. 

Write for complete information. 
(Boiler Department) 




Harbor Com. 
BIdgr. 
Toronto. 




Factory — St. 
Catharines, 
Ontario 



r 



There's Always 
a Revival 



in Bathroom Fittings 
and Hardware Special- 
ties trade right after 
the New Year. 





This year YOU can 
make a lot of extra 
money by keeping an 
attractive display of a 
fairly wide range of 




Bathroom Fittings and 
Hardware Specialties 

constantly before your 
customers. 

Write us for 
Catalogue "G" 



The Gendron Mfg. Co., Ltd. 

Duchess Street, Toronto ^ 



Good Plumbing 

Calls For 

JENKINS VALVES 




Fig. 106 
Jenkins Brass Globe Valve. 

What makes Jenkins Valves so 
much better than ordinary valves 
is — 

The high-grade Brass, Iron 
or Cast Steel from which 
they are made. 

The scientific way in which 
they are constructed. 

The scrupulous care with 
which every valve is tested 
for service before leaving 
the factory. 

Jenkins Valves are DEPENDABLE even 
under unusually severe conditions. 

Plumbing and Heating Contractors 
should write for interesting literature 
describing the complete Jenkins line. 
It will be mailed on request. 



JENKINS BROS., LIMITED 

103 St. Remi St., Montreal 

TORONTO VANCOUVER 
European Branch: 6 Great Queen St., Kings- 
way, London, W.C. 2, England 



IJenEns 

SINCE 1864 




Take no chances^buij the advertised lines. 



44 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



February 1, 1923 




AIR LINE SYSTEMS 

C. A. Dunham, Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., Man- 
chester. Eng. 
ALUMINUM CASTINGS 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
AIR VALVES 

Beaton & Caldwell Mfg. Co., New Britain, 
Conn. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Samia, Ont. 

J. H. Wiliams Co., Brooklyn. New York. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., Man- 
chester, Eng. 

Wallaceburg Brass & Iron Mfg. Co., Ltd., Wal- 
laceburg, Ont. 

Wolverine Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 
BATHROOM FITTINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Gendron Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
BENDING SPRINGS 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd.. Toronto. 

BOILERS. STEAM OR HOT WATER 

Gurney Foundry Co., Limited. Toronto. 
Lord & Burnham Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 
Spencer Henter Co., Ltd.. Toronto, Ont. 
Warden King, Ltd.. Montreal. 

BOILER FEED REGULATORS 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

C. A. Dunham Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
BOILER STANDS 

Fittings. Limited, Oshawa. 
BOLTS, EYE 

J. H. Williams & Co.. Brooklyn. N. Y. 
BOLTS AND NUTS 

Fittings Limited, Oshawa. 
BRASS GOODS, VALVES, ETC. 

Canadian Brass Co., Ltd., Gait, Ont. 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

C. A. Durham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg.. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 

Gait Brass Co., Limited, Gait. 

Kerr Engine Co., Ltd., Walkerville. 

James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co.. Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia. Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

United Brassfounders and Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
Wallaceburg Brass & Iron Mfg. Co., Ltd,. Wal- 
laceburg, Ont. 

Wolverine Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto 
BRASS PIPE AND TUBE 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Ltd.. London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers Ltd.. 
Manchester, Eng. 

Wolverine. Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 
CASTINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 
CELLAR DRAINERS 

Gait Brass Co., Limited, Gait. 

Empire Mfg. Ltd.. London and Toronto. 

James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co.. Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto, and 
Hamilton. 
CUtCULATORS 

J. H. Williams & Co.. Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
CHAINS 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
CLOSETS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

Gait Brass Co., Limited, Gait. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg., Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 



CONDENSATION UNITS 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

The Westco Pumps, Limited, Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
COUNTRY RESIDENCE EQUIPMENTS 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Sarnia, Ont. 
COUPLINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Fittings Limited, Oshawa. 
DAMPER REGULATORS 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
DRAINAGE FITTINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

Fittings Limited. Oshawa. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., Man- 
chester. Eng. 

Warden King. Ltd., Montreal. 
DRAIN PIPE SOLVENT 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

Hercules Chemical Co.. Inc., New York City. 
DRINKING FOUNTAINS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg., Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 
DROP FORCINGS 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
EJECTORS. STEAM 

Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester. Eng. 
ENAMELWARE 

Amherst Foundry Co., Ltd., Amherst, N.S. 

Canada Metal Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 

Emoire Mfg Co., Ltd.. London and Toronto. 

Gait Brass Co.. Limited. Gait. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standa-d San : tary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

Port Hope Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Port Hope. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 
ELECTRIC PUMPING MACHINERY 

Empire M f g. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
EXPANSION TANKS 

Toronto Hardware Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
FITTINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto, 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

Fittings Limited. Oshawa. 

James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co.. Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Sarnia. Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester. Eng. 

Warden King Ltd.. Montreal. 
FLUSHOMF1ERS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd . Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London ar-d Toronto. 

Gait Brass Co.. Ltd., Gait. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Sarnm, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

Wolverine Ltd.. Toronto, Ont. 
FLOOR AND CEILING PLATES 

Beaton & Cadwell Mfg. Co.. New Britain^ Conn. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

Fittings. Limited. Oshawa. 

Wolverine Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
FURNACES 

Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto. 

Warden King, Ltd., Montreal. 

Spencer Heater Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Hamilton Stove & Heater Co.. Homilton. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne, Hamilton. 

Hall-Zryd, Hespeler, Ont. 

Vulcan Co., London, Ont. 
GASOLINE ENGINES 

Empire Mfg. Co.. Ltd.. London and Toronto. 



GAS WATER HEATERS 

Bastian-Morley. Limited. Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto, 
James Morrison Brass Mfg., Toronto. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
GALVANIZING 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 

HEAT GENERATORS 

Gait Brass Co., Gait, Ont. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toromo. 
HEATING APPARATUS 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
HEATERS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 

Lord & Burnham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Warden King, Ltd., Montreal and Toronto. 

W. H. Cumningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
HEATING SYSTEMS 

C. A. Dunham Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto,. 
HOIST HOOKS 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn. N.Y. 
JAPANNING 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 
KEROSENE WATER HEATERS 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
LAUNDRY TUBS 

The Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto- 
Hamilton. 
LEAD 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Torontoi 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto, 
Hamilton. 
MACHINISTS' TOOLS 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

MALLEABLE IRON CASTINGS 

Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto. 
Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 
MACHINE BOLTS AND NUTS 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 

MIXING VALVES 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Samia, Ont 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

Port Hope Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Port Hope; 
PACKING 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
RADIATOR FOOT RESTS 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto^ 

Wolverine Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

PACKLESS RADIATOR VALVES 

Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville. 
C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 
PIPE AND RADIATOR HANGERS 

Beaton & Cadwell Mfg. Co., New Britain, 

Conn. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

Healy-Ruff Company, Minneapolis, Minn. 
PIPE, BLACK AND GALVANIZED 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Canadian Tube and Iron Co., Ltd., Montreal^ 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Samia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 
PIPE CLEANSER- 

Chamberlain Desolvo Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto 

Hercules Chemical Co., Inc., New York City. 

Wolverine. Ltd.. Toronto, Ont. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

PIPE JOINT COMPOUNDS 

Wolverine, Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill. Ltd., Toronto. 



February 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



45 





Telling 

the 
World 



The manufacturer or jobber of plumbing and heating sup- 
plies who has an honest product and honest service to sell is 
always anxious to tell his message to the trade. 

The announcements of those manufacturers and jobbers of 
plumbing and heating supplies who have neither of these 
things to offer will not be found in the pages of this journal 
because open publicity is the last thing desired in such cases. 

Advertising is not lightly accepted by this paper and the 
oroduct to be advertised must measure up to this standard — 
"Will it give honest service to the ultimate buyer — Will the 
manufacturer stand back of it four square?" 

That's why Canadian Sanitary and Heating Engineers can 
feel quite safe in buying products advertised in this paper. 
And that's why only the best products will be found adver- 
tised here. 

TAKE NO CHANCES 

Buy the Advertised Lines 



46 



Sanitary En 



GINEER, PLUMBER AND SteamFITTER February 1, 1923 



PIPE, SOIL AND FITTINGS 

Anthes Foundry Co., Toronto and Winnipeg. 
Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 
Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

Toronto Hardware Mfg., Co., Toronto. 

Warden King, Ltd., Montreal. 
PIPE THREADING TOOLS AND MACHINERY 

Borden Canadian Co., Toronto. 

A. B. Jardine & Co., Hespeler. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd.. Toronto. 
PIPE WRENCHES 

J. H. Williams Co., Brooklyn, New York. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
PLUMBERS' TOOLS 

J. H. Williams & Co., Montreal. Que. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
PNEUMATIC WATER SUPPLY TANKS 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 
PORCELAIN WARE 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
PUMPS 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Limited. 

The Westco Pumps Limited, Toronto. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
PUMPING SYSTEMS, AUTOMATIC 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Limited. 

The Westco Pumps, Limited, Toronto. 

Beaton & Cadwell Mfg. Co., New Britain. Conn. 
RADIATORS 

Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto. 

Lord & Burnham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Warden King Ltd., Montreal. 
RADIATOR HANGERS 

Healy Ruff Company. 
RADIATOR NIPPLES 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 
RADIATOR TRAPS (STEAM) 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Sarnia, Ont. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers Ltd., Man- 
chester, Eng. 



RIVETS 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 

RANGE BOILERS 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Hamilton. 

The Canadian John Wood Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Toronto Hardware Mfg. Co.. Toronto. 
REDUCING PRESSURE VALVES 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd.. 
Manchester, Eng. 
RETURN TILTING TRAPS 

Grant E. Cole Co.. 23 River Street, Toronto. 
ROOF FLANGES AND FLASHINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto, 
Hamilton. 

SEPTIC TANK VALVES AND SYPHONS 

Anthes Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

SINK BRACKETS 

Fittings, Limited. Oshawa. 
SOCKETS. WIRE ROPE 

J. H. Williams & Co., Montreal, Que. 
SOLDER 

Canada Metal Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 

STEAM SPECIALTIES 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
STEAM TRAPS 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
STOVES 

Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto. 

STOVES, GAS AND COAL 

Gurney Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
SWIVELS, HOOK 

J. H. Williams & Co.. Brooklyn, N.Y. 
TANKS, STEEL 

The Canadian John Wood Mfg. Co., Toronto. 



TANK BULBS, (RUBBER) 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
THUMB SCREWS AND NUTS 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
TOOLS 

Wolverine, Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
TORCHES 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
UNIONS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd.. 
Manchester, Eng. 
VAPOR HEATING SYSTEMS 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
VISES, CHAIN, CLAMP, MOUNT 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
VITRO TANKS 

Gait Brass Co., Ltd., Gait. 
VACUUM SYSTEMS OF HEATING 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
VALVES 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 
Jenkins Bros., Ltd., Montreal, Que. 
The Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
United Brassfounders & Engineers Ltd., 

Manchester, Eng. 
WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Hamilton. 

The Westco Pumps, Limited, Toronto 
WASHERS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto 

WASHING MACHINES 

Gurney Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
WRENCHES, SET, DROP FORGED, 
ENGINEERS, SOCKET AND CHAIN PIPE 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
WROUGHT COUPLINGS AND NIPPLES 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Fittings, Ltd., Oshawa. 




Fig. 153. 




Buy Your Heating and 
Plumbing Machinery 
Direct from the Maker 



You can save real money and at the same time 
be absolutely certain of getting what you want 
when you deal directly with us. 

Smart Turner equipment includes Automatic 
Feed Pumps — both steam and motor driven, 
Boiler Feed Pumps, Foot Valves and Strainers, 
Sump Pumps, Steam and Oil Separators. 

Write to-day for catalogue and prices. 




No. 115 Screwed Foot 
Valve. 





The Smart Turner Machine Co. 

Limited 

Hamilton Canada 




Fig. W-155. 



Fig. W-202. 



// it's advertised in Sanitary Engineer you knoic it's all right. 



February 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



47 




■IB 







FITTINGS LIMITED 

OSHAWA, CAN. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

3B BIIAM©MD S3 PIPE FITTINGS 







KERR VALVES 

Look at this Valve 

Note the design, the sturdy construction, note 
the compact and narrow face to face dimen- 
sions, observe the accessibility of the stuffing 
box; and the properly spaced bolting. 

The Kerr Gate Valve here illustrated gives 
complete satisfaction whenever and wherever 
used. 



<i 



7 



Ask for Kerr's Valves 



Z?/ie KERR ENGINE COMPANY 



WALKERVILLL 



LIMITED 

Va/ve Manufacturers 



ONTARIO 




It pays to buy advertised lines. 



4 s 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February l, 1923 



The Heart of the Heating System 




"Mogul" Hot Water Boiler 

(N'os. 1, 2, 3, Constructed 
as above) 



The Mogul Boiler is the heart of the heating 
system; a great, warm, pulsing dependable 
heart that withstands for years the effect of 
use and deterioration. 

From base to fuel saver, the boltless-cotter- 
pinless grate bars, the specially designed fire- 
pot, the lined doors, the individual flue doors, 
the wire handles, the peculiarly designed sec- 
tions, the rapid circulation, the packless 
joints, the few parts, the ease of handling and 
the guaranteed ratings, place the Saffoid 
Mogul Boiler in a class by itself. 

Write for illustrated booklets. 

Dominion Radiator©mpany 

■ * LurutedV 

Montreal Que. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Regina, Sask. 
Vancouver, B.C. 



Halifax, N.S. 
St. John, N.B. 
Calgary, Alta. 



TORONTO 
OTTAWA 



Ml 



■ ■ 



The Difference in Advertising Is the 

Difference in Men 



Of itself, advertising is little. And the 
differences in it are the differences which 
exist in men. 

Just as some men are strong and virile 
and interesting, so is some advertising. 
And just as some men are ineffectual and 
weak and boring, so is some other adver- 
tising. 

"Does it pay to advertise?" It pays 
those men who are keen enough students 
of the public to make it pay them. It 
pays those men who are truthful, sincere, 
interesting and believable. 



It pays the men whose product deserves 
the payment, whose brains are keen 
enough to organize for success and judge 
enough of the human mind to know how 
to tell their story with sincerity and in- 
terest. 

So when you judge advertising, judge 
it by how it is used and by whom — not of 
itself and of itself alone. 

Remember, an ugly man looks just as 
ugly in a mirror. 



Merchandise advertised here is O.K. 



February 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



49 




WILLIAMS' 
SUPERIOR PIPE TOOLS 

VULCAN" CHAIN WRENCH and VISE 
STILLSON WRENCHES 

Literature on Request 

J. H. WILLIAMS & CO., Limited 

"The Drop-Forging People" 
77 Thorold Road, St. Catharines, Ont. 



The Everlasting 
Veneer Toilet Seat 




Strong, Clean 
Hygienic 

This reliable, dependable 
toilet seat is made of "i 
and 9-ply, air-seasoned 
wood veneer, held to- 
gether by our special 
wood cement. This ce- 
ment is proof against 
heat, cold or dampness. 
The veneering is distri- 
buted according to the 
strain and wear required 
of the different parts. 
The Everlasting Seat will 
never crack, warp or 
split. 



It is a splendid seat for use in cold, damp basements 
where closets must be installed. The Everlasting Toilet 
Seat will meet, and successfully resist, these severe con- 
ditions of moisture, changing temperature, etc. 



Canadian 
Veneering Company, 
Incorporated 

Acton Vale Quebec 



TRADE 



RUNWELL 

> — 4r 



MARK 



SEMI-ROTARY 
WING 
PUMPS 



British 
Manufacture 




Ask your 
Jobber to 
supply you 
with these 
Pumps. 



Representatives: 

BRITISH COLUMBIA; U.S.A. — WASHINGTON, OREGON, CALIFORNIA. 

FRANK RAW & CO., 198 Hastings St. W., Vancouver, B.C. 
MANITOBA, SASKATCHEWAN, ALBERTA: 

FREDERICK SARA & CO., Calgary. 
ONTARIO, QUEBEC/MARITIME PROVINCES: 

UNIVERSAL SUPPLIES, LTD., 212 Coristine Bldg., Montreal 



TRIMO 

A Winner Always 



The "Trimo" Wrench, with 
Steel Frames, that do not 
break, and Nut Guards that 
protect the adjusting nut is 
a winner. 




Has insert jaw in handle, replaceable 
when worn, saving' the handle. A 
hidden spring- always in place. Made 
in both wood handles and steel 
handles. 



Trimont Manufacturing Co. 

55-71 Amory Street, 
ROXBURY (BOSTON), MASS., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVE: 

George P. Fraser, 28 Temple Ave. 

TORONTO 



Buy goods that are open 1o the light of publicity. 



50 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February l, 1923 




Rates for Classified Advertising 

Advertisements under this heading 3c per word for first insertion; 2c for each subsequent insertion. 

Where answers come to Box number in our care to be forwarded, 5 cents extra per insertion must 
be added to cover postage, etc. 

Contractions count as one word, but five figures (as $1,000), are allowed as one word. 

Rates (payable in advance). When panels are desired a charge of $2.50 is made for a panel 1 
inch deep by 2Vs inches wide. Minimum charge for any ad. $1.00. 



WANTED 



ENGLISH FIRM wishes to purchase 
large quantity of new and good secondhand 
screwed and socketted tubes, sizes 1" to 
6". Also Weldless Loose Flanged Tubes. 
Writes •'Tubes" c/o Taylers, 30 Fleet St., 
London. England. 



SITUATION WANTED 



VOUNG MAN — 21 YEARS OF AGE, SEEKS 
steady employment with plumber who will 
teach him the trade. Box 108, Sanitary Engineer 
Toronto. 



Sanitary Engineer 



is the logical medium to 
use if you have a message 
for the Plumbing and 
Heating trade of Canada 



FOR SALE 



pOR SALE— PLUMBING, HEATING AND 
tinsmithing business, established twelve years, 
in one of the best cities in Western Canada. 
Agency for a leading line of furnaces. Sickness 
the only cause for selling. Box 224, Hardware & 
Metal. Toronto. 



ADDRESSING MACHINE FOR SALE— WE 
have a complete Belknap Addressing Equip- 
ment for sale. This equipment is still in use in 
our Subscription Department and is in excellent 
working order. We have placed an attractive 
price on this outfit, and would advise manufac- 
turers or merchants having a mailing list to 
let lis tell you how it will save you money. We 
will give a guarantee as to the proper working 
condition of this equipment. The MacLean Pub- 
lishing Co., Ltd., 143 University Avenue, Toronto, 
Ontario. 



OPPORTUNITY FOR SALESMEN 

Wanted: Salesmen in various parts of Canada calling on retail trade, 
to carry sideline which we feel sure will be approved by his principals 
and will increase the purchasing power of his clients. 
Earnings will be on a commission basis and should amount to a substant- 
ial figure. Applicants must have good record for production, and must 
give satisfactory references as to character, reliability, etc. 
Apply, giving experience, references and names of firms by whom em- 
ployed during past ten years ; also state definitely the territory you 
cover and how frequently you go over the ground. No application 
considered unless this information is given. All applications will be 
treated in strictest confidence. 

Box 600 

SANITARY ENGINEER, 143 University Ave., Toronto 



""PAYLOR SAFES FOR SALE— RARE OPPOR- 
tunity to secure a safe at small cost. They 
are in splendid condition. Inside dimensions and 
prices are as follows: 15 in. deep, 2 ft. 6 in. wide, 

3 ft. HVi in. high, fitted with built-in compart- 
ment. Price $250.00. 18 in. deep. 2 ft. 8 in. wide, 

4 ft. 5 in. high, fitted with steel compartment 
Price $200.00 Apply Box No. 701, Sanitary En- 
gineer. Toronto. 




DIRECT CURRENT MOTORS 
KINGSTON PENITENTIARY 

SEALED TENDERS addressed to "The Super- 
intendent of Penitentiaries, Ottawa," and en- 
dorsed, "Tender for Motors" will be received until 
Wednesday, February 28, 1923, from parties de- 
siring to purchase any or all of the following 
electric motors : — 

No.H.P. Volts Revolut'ns Manufacturer 

Dick Kerr Mfg. Co. 
Dick Kerr Mfg. Co. 
Sprague Electric Co. 
Peerless Motor Co. 
(Direct connected to fan) 
Dick Kerr Mfg. Co. 
Dick Kerr Mfg. Co 

Westinghouse, no base. 
Westinghouse, no base. 
Jones and Moore. 
General Electric Co. 
General Electric Co. 
General Electric Co. 
Westi nghouse ( Gri ds 

and Controller) 
Westinghouse (Grids 

and Controller) 
Westinghouse 
(Armature will require to be rewound.) 

Starters Supplied With All Motors 

The above mentioned are in good repair and 
may be viewed at the Kingston Penitentiary, 
Kingston, Ont. 

Terms of sale — cash. 

Motors to be removed from the Penitentiary 
before March 20, 1923. 

Papers inserting this notice without authority 
from the King's Printer, will not be paid there- i 

for. 

(Signed) W. ST. PIERRE HUGHES. D.S.O. 

Superintendent of Penitentiaries. 
Department of Justice 

Ottawa. Janurry 25, 1923. 



10 


100 


850 R.P.M. 


15 


110 


960 R.P.M. 


1 


110 


1725 R.P.M. 


10 


110 


1100 R.P.M. 


10 


110 


850 R.P.M. 


10 


110 


850 R.P.M. 


5 


110 


(650 to 1500 






R.P.M. 


35 


110 


1800 R.P.M. 


3 


110 


1650 R.P.M. 


3 


110 


1100 R.P.M. 


10 


110 


1400 R.P.M. 


15 


110 


1150 R.P.M. 


30 


110 


Variable 


10 


110 


Variable 


1 


110 





February 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



51 



Index to Advertisers 



Allison, K. B 4 

i Amherst Foundry Co., Ltd., 

Inside Back Cover 

Anthes Foundry Co 2-3 

Ashwell & Nesbit, Ltd 49 

Bastian-Morley 11 

Beaton & Cadwell Mfg. Co 11 

Canada Metal Co 1 

Canadian Tube & Steel Products 52 

Canadian Veneering Co., Inc 49 

Canadian Potteries, Ltd 12 

Cunningham Hill, Ltd., W. H 14 

Dart Union Co., Ltd Inside Back Cover 

Dominion Radiator Co., Ltd 48 

Dunham, C. A., Co 10 

Empire Brass Mfg. Co., Outside Front Cover 

Fittings, Ltd 47 

Forwell Foundry, Ltd 11 

Gendron Mfg. Co., Ltd 43 

Gait Brass Co Outside Back Cover 

Gurney Foundry Co 26-27 

Henderson Business Service, Ltd 8 

Healy-Ruff Co 52 

Jenkins Bros. 43 

Jardine & Co., A. B 14 

Katie Foundry Co 52 

Kerr Eng. Co., Ltd 47 

Lord & Burnham Co 43 

Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., H. 41 

Pipe Tool & Repair Co 52 

Smart Turner Machine Co. . 46 

Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada, Ltd. 

Inside Front Cover 

St. Louis Technical Institute 11 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co 6-7 

Steel Trough & Machine Co 52 

Toronto Hardware Mfg. Co., Ltd. ..... 52 

Trimont Manufacturing Co. 49 

Want Ad. Page 50 

Warden King, Ltd 10 

Wallaceburg Brass & Iron Mfg. Co., 

Ltd 9 

Williams & Co., J. H 49 

Wolverine, Limited 51 



Prepare for High Water 

Instal 

Wolverine Back Water 




Prompt Shipment. Large Stock. 

Better Order To-day. 




"Sure Seat" Tank Balls 




It pays to have Wolverine Articles on 
hand for instant use. ORDER NOW. 



The unknown bratid is prubahhj second grade — buy adrertisrd lines. 



52 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February 1, 1923 




TRY IT! The E-Z Radiator Hanger 

You'll only have to try it once because it always works satisfactorily and 
there is a demand for more all the time. 

It hangs radiators securely and is a real device to give a neat and complete 
finish to the interior of every home. 

The E. Z. Radiator Hanger has one Bolt, Invisible Washer. Horizontal 
Adjustment. Vertical Adjustment, Baseboard Adjustment. 
Made for Wall and Column Radiators. 

IMMEDIATE SHIPMENTS FROM LARGE STOCKS 



MADE IN CANADA 



HEALY-RUFF CO. 



J. H. Leonard. Tribune BUlg.. Winnipeg. 

D. G. Brison, Standard Bank Building 
Vancouver. 

A. Walker, 514 McLean Bids .. Calgarv. 

E. T. Flanigan, 229 College St., Tor- 
onto. 



MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Eager Coombs &. Co.. Ltd. Halifax, 

Can. 

Shaver Bros., Booth Bldg., Ottawa. 

S. T. Hadley. 304 University St. 
Montreal. 




Style R." 



THE TRADE 

Is Respectfully Cautioned 
to specify 

RIVETED 
RANGE BOILERS 

Made by the old reliable 

TORONTO HARDWARE 
MFG. CO., LIMITED 



WROUGHT PIPE 

Suitable for the approaching period of 
building activity, road construction, etc. 
>^^|V^^ This is a line of great importance in 
\ ■ J making successful, profitable contracts . 

Our C. T. Brand of Wrought Pipe has 
>^>r been 

THOROUGHLY INSPECTED 

by practical, experienced men. It is tested to 600 
lbs. hydraulic pressure, and branded with our trade- 
mark. We carry this line of reliable pipe in size? 
%-in. to 4-in. Black or Galvanized. We also manu- 
facture nipples and couplings, black and galvanized, 
in all sizes. 

Ask your Jobber for C. T. Brand Wrought Pipe 

Canadian Tube and Steel Products Co., Ltd. 

Operating Canadian Tube and Iron Co., Limited 
Works at Lachine Canal, Montreal 



PATENTED 

CANADA 




Better 
Selling 
Value 
Than Ever 



We have equipped our Steel Batfhs with Pressed Steel Removable 
Legs and 3 inch Roll Rim around the top, for which we have 
secured a Canadian Patent This Roll Rim adds greatly to the 

selling value of 



TWEED 



ENAMELLED 
STEEL 



BATHS 



They now look like the expensive cast enamel baths but are the 
same price as before. Our new patent Roll Rim Enamelled Steel 
Baths are now ready for shipment — Order samples. 

The Steel Trough & Machine Co. Ltd. 

Tweed — Ontario — Canada. 
Toronto Office: 220 King St. W. Montreal Office: St. Nicholas Bldg. 




Easier to attach 
More permanen t 
Cost less 



Tapped Closet Bend 




Plumbers and Steamfitters — 

There is only one kind of satisfactory tool and 
that is one that is in perfect working order. 
Inefficient tools are a direct liability to vou. 

Gather up your broken tools to-day, send them 
to us and we will quickly put them in shape 
for you. 

CANADIAN SERVICE STATION 
FOR BEAVER TOOLS 

The Pipe Tool and Repair Co. 

Adelaide St. W. -:- Toronto, Ont. 

Repairmen to the Canadian Plumber and Steamfitter. 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 




Union Pipe Couplings 

are practically indestructible because they are made of Heavy Malle- 
able Castings, and the joint being Bronze against Bronze, gives the 
strongest kind of guarantee that the Dart will stay as tight as it is 
first made when screwed to a pipe line. 

The Dart's reputation is based on the opinion of others; ask any- 
one who has had experience with Dart Unions, regarding their ef- 
ficiency. 

ORDER FROM YOUR JOBBER. There's a variety of styles to 
fill all requirements. 

manufactured by 

DART UNION CO., LIMITED 

TORONTO, ONTARIO 



Ell 


1 Hill Ill Illlll :JN NIliNIINNNNNNNN IN IN IN IN IN NlillNNIIillN 1 1 II HUH 1 II 






BEAVER BRAND 






Porcelain Enamel Ware 






— Your Guarantee of Quality— 






Beaver Brand Enamelware by its ability to meet the 
highest demands for service under all conditions, 
has established itself in the confidence of the public 
to such an extent that each month witnesses an ever- 
increasing demand for products of Beaver manu- 
facture. 






Amherst Foundry Co., Limited 






General Offices and Factory : Amherst, N.S. 






Agents : 






Ontario : Manitoba and Northwest : 






Monarch Brass Mfg. Co. E. B. Plewes 
71 Brown St., Toronto 197 Princess St., Winnipeg 




1 


TTmiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiii lllllllllllllllliiM 



3 



ST 




Endurance 

As the granite cliffs of our storm-beaten 
coasts defy indefinitely the fury of the wat- 
ers, so does the Vitro Tank successfully re- 
sist the assaults of time. 

The sheer, white beauty of the New Design 
Vitro shines in all its pristine splendour years 
after its installation has been made — after the 
date of that installation has been forgotten. 

That Canadian people appreciate those quali- 
ties of strength, permanence and efficiency 
which combined with beauty makes Vitro the 
triumph that it is — is demonstrated by the 
fact that this tank still leads the Canadian 
market in sales. 

Your Jobber has them 

Gait Brass Company, Limited 

GALT ONTARIO 






Plumber and Steam fitter of Canada 



Vol. XVII. 



PUBLICATION OFFICE, TORONTO, FEBRUARY 15, 1923 



No. 4 



Hot or Cold Water From 
the Same Spout 




The New "Emco" Swing Spout Double Sink Cock 

This "Emco" fixture — a recent addition to the "Emco" 
line — has already proved its popularity. 

It combines two fixtures in one — hot or cold water from 
the same spout. Beauty and convenience are recognized 
in the design and finish of this fixture. Made of the best 
grade of metal. 

Ask your Jobber or write direct to us. 

Empire Brass Mfg. Co. Limited 

LONDON and TORONTO, CANADA 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



Plumbers! 

Pussyfoot 

Tanks 



are exceptionally cheap for present 
booking. 

Many Jobbers have taken advantage 
of the prevailing low prices, and 

Pussyfoot" Closet Tanks 








Pussyfoot 

SIMPLEX VALVE 

are the Best value any Plumber can buy. 

DEMAND these from your Jobber and get 
the benefit of the highest Efficiency and 
greatest Value in your Tank requirements. 

Guaranteed in Every Way 
Buy from Your Jobber 



THE CANADA METAL COMPANY 

LIMITED 



Montreal Hamilton TORONTO Winnipeg Vancouver 



February 15, 1923 SANITARY E.NGIN.EER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



1 



You can profitably use the "A-l" 
On 90% of your installations 




FULLY 90% of all Sanitary instal- 
lations call for the ordinary wash- 
down combination — simply because it 
is about the most inexpensive type of 
closet outfit available. 

But if your client exercises economy 
in choosing a closet combination of 
relatively low price, surely you can 
only serve his best interests by fur- 
nishing only the best his money can 
buy— the "A-l" Closet and "Belle- 
meacle Junior" Tank. 



CANADIAN Solid Vitreous Ware 
stands pre-eminently superior as 
a truly sanitary material in the con- 
struction of both closet bowls and 
tanks. Its fine-grained, all-clay hard- 
burned vitreous body ensures a life- 
time of unchanging service while its 
lustrous white surface adds beauty to 
any toilet room and is as easily kept 
clean as a china plate. 

On the basis of present prices this 
combination affords a realization of 
value which cannot be challenged. 



CANADIAN POTTERIES 



LIMITDD 



SAINT JOHNS 

QUEBEC 



Sales handled exclusively through recognized jobbers in Plumbing Supplies. 



2 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February 15, 1923 



You are Invited 




E HAVE ready for distribution 
a series of four beautifully de- 
signed and printed bathroom 

scenes. 



These truly beautiful pictures in four colors meas- 
ure io l /> x 13 inches and are worthy of framing. 
Used as ordinary hangers even, they compel atten- 
tion bv their charm. 



Naturally these exquisite drawings depict 
^tatfdatnf Fixtures. They carry in a delightful 
but impressive manner the charm of the modern, 
well equipped bathroom. 



The high cost of these pictures necessitates careful 
distribution. Master plumbers are invited to write 
us on their business letterheads, when a set will be 
gladly mailed without charge. 



Standard «Santtat» <H)^|. Co. 

Limited 

General Office and Factory: Royce and Lansdowne Aves., Toronto, Ont. 

Calgary: Hamilton Store: Montreal: 

354 11th Avenue West 26-28 Jackson Street West New Birks Bldg. 

Winnipeg Showrooms: " IK/T rin 'n nrtAn" Vancouver: 

145 Market Street East ±VlCiae-tn-1^atlCl(la 860 Cambie Street 



1 11 1 1 II I M,l 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 lit 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 '7 



February 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



3 





Griffith's All Metal Septic Tanks 

Installed in half the time — Make Profits Sure 

No more waiting for cement to dry; no further dependence 
on masons or bricklayers — You install a Griffith Septic- 
Tank and make immediate connections. At once you have 
a perfect working job. 

"Griffith's" Tanks are fully approved by Provincial Auth- 
orities and can be had in a range of sizes in both Syphon 
and Overflow types, suitable for homes, schools and fac- 
tories. 

Our service department exists to take the grief out of 
plumbers' lives; write us about your installation problems 
and our experts will promptly send you a sketch making 
clear all doubtful matters. 

Write to-day for Catalogue and dealer's price list 



T.G.GRIFFITH & COMPANY 

Manufacturers and Sanitary Engineers 
15 Jarvis St. - Toronto, Ontario 




February 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



\nthes Syphon 

' The Heart of the Disposal System" 

With the installation of a modern sewage disposal system, 
new standards of living are made possible in the farm home. 

Gone forever is the out door toilet — gone the trick bath in a 
wash tub ; gone the laborious hauling of water by hand from 
pump to kitchen — gone a thousand and one annoyances that 
have made farm life so unattractive, so drab, so primitive. 

And the Heart of the Disposal System 
is the Anthes Syphon 

Scores of farmers in your district can be sold now on a disposal 
system — scores of them who have sworn to never again go 
through a winter without the sanitary conveniences that made life 
worth living. 

And each sale of a disposal system opens up wonderful oppor- 
tunities for further sales; automatic pumps, water heaters, bath 
tubs, lavatories, toilet bowls — and the job of their installation. 
Some one is going to get the business. Why not you? 

For Permanent Soil Pipe Satisfaction Specify "Anthes'* 

Anthes Foundry 

Limited 

Toronto and Winnipeg 

Manufacturers of 
Cast Iron Soil Pipe and Fittings 



6 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



February 15, 1923 





February 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 




USE 



TESTED Soil Pipe 

IT COSTS NO MORE AND YOU KNOW THE JOB IS RIGHT 

Manufactured by 

FORWELL FOUNDRY, LTD. 

KITCHENER, ONT. 



Farrfhern Steam Service 



If you have a complicated steam 
job, stop merely trying, and have our 
expert immediately give it the "once 
over." 

Stop wishing — let us rip into the 
trouble for you. Others do it. 

In the solving of steam and con- 
densation problems, whether it is 
steam process or heating work, we 
can be of service to you, being spec- 
ialists in this line. 

If you are 1 interested in giving your 
customers the most economical, effi- 
cient, and dependable type of equip- 
ment for service in returning conden- 
sation and boiler feeding, write us for 
information. 



J. E. FARRELL, Director of Sales 

210 Galley Ave. Toronto 




A Word About Cleanout Doors 

You and I know that clean flues mean coal 
saving, and the easier cleaned, the oftener 
cleaned. That's why each Burnham Boiler 
flue has its own separate cleanout door. 
Any flue c-an be cleaned at any time re- 
gardless of how big- or little the fire is. 

Write us for complete information. 
(Boiler Department) 



Harbor 
Commission 
Bldg., 
Toronto 




Factory : 
St. Catharines. 
Ontario 




TRY IT! The E-Z Radiator Hanger 

You'll only have to try it once because it always works satisfactorily and 
there is a demand for more all the time. 

It hangs radiators securely and is a real device to give a neat and complete 
finish to the interior of every home. 

The E. Z. Radiator Hanger has one Bolt. Invisible Washer, Horizontal 
Adjustment. Vertical Adjustment. Baseboard Adjustment. 
Made for Wall and Column Radiators. 

IMMEDIATE SHIPMENTS FROM LARGE STOCKS 




MADE IN CANADA 



HEALY-RUFF CO. 



MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 



J. H. Leonard, Tribune Bldg., Winnipeg. 

D. G. Brison, Standard Bank Building 
Vancouver. 

A. Walker, 514 McLean Bldg., Calgary, 

E. T. Flanigan, 229 College St.. Tor- 
onto. 



Ltd. Halifax. 



Eager Coombs & Co., 

Can. 

Shaver Bros.. Booth Bldg., Ottawa. 

S. T. Hadley. S04 University St. 
Montreal. 




'Style R. 



8 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February 15, 1923 




Soil Pipe and Fittings 

Each Piece Manufactured 

For Permanence 

Crowding close upon us is the rush season for soil pipe. 

With the advent of spring, much long deferred work will be 
undertaken — sewage disposal systems, drains, etc. 

Be sure always to specify W. K. soil pipe for this class of 
work. 

It is made in the same lengths and same sizes, sells at the 
same prices as ordinary brands — BUT — 'the quality is vastly 
different. 

Immediate shipments guaranteed from either Toronto or 
Montreal. 

WARDEN KING LIMITED 

MONTREAL 

Branch Office: 136 Simcoe Street, Toronto 




February 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



9 



SANITARY ENGINEER 

PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER OF CANADA 

ESTABLISHED 1907 PUBLISHED TWICE MONTHLY 

Vol. XVII PUBLICATION OFFICE :- TORONTO, FEBRUARY 15, 1923 No. 4 



CONTENTS 

Plumber Had to Re-order Certain Fittings for Special Sale 11 

Plumber Develops Filter Business 12 

$200 Home Water Plant Sells Additional Equipment 13 

We Launch a Prodigious Publicity Campaign 14 

Price Cutting Easier Than Selling 16 

Questions and Answers 17 

Rural Sewage Disposal Systems 18 

Rating of Furnaces Must be Based on Register Temperature .... 20 

Editorial Comment 24 

Stockdale to Write for Sanitary Engineer 25 

News Notes From Coast to Coast 26 

Heating Engineer Gives a Demonstration 28 

Patterns for Smoke Pipe Branch 29 

Current Market Tendencies 30-36 



The MacLean Publishing Company, Ltd. 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN, President. H. T. HUNTER, Vice-President. 

H. V. TYRRELL, General Manager. 

Publishers of Sanitary Engineer, Hardware and Metal, The Financial Post, MaeLean's Magazine, 
Canadian Grocer, Dry Goods Review, Men's Wear Review, Canadian Printer and Publisher, 
Bookseller and Stationer, Canadian Machinery and Manufacturing News, Power House, Canadian 
Foundryman, Canadian Shipping and Marine Engineerig News, Canadian Automotive Trade 

Journal, Druggists' Weekly. 
Cable Address : Macpubco, Toronto : Atabek, London, Eng. 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter of Canada 

Published on the First and Fifteenth of Each Month 

Office of Publication : 143-153 University Avenue, Toronto, Canada. 

GEO. D. DAVIS. Manager. 
NORTON W. KINGSLAND, Advertising Manager. 

H. L. SOUTHALL, Managing Editor. N. A. KEARNS, Contributing Editor. 

B. C. CULLEY, Associate Editor. O. W. KOTHE, Contributing Editor. 

W. C. DOVER, Associate Editor. EDWIN NEWSOME, Technical Editor. 



CHIEF OFFICES 

CANADA — Montreal, Southam Bldg.. 128 Bleury St., Phone Plateau 946. Toronto, 143-153 University Ave, Tele- 
phone Adel. 5740 ; Winnipeg, 810' Confederation Life Bldg., Telephone A. 3773. 

GREAT BRITAIN — London, The MacLean Company of Great Britain, Limited, 88 Fleet Street, E.C.. E. J. Dodd, 
Director, Telephone Central 12960. Cable Address : Atabek, London, England. 

UNITED STATES— New York L. H. Meyer, 1606 St. James Bldg.. 1133 Broadway, Telephone Watkins 5868 ; 
Boston, C. L. Morton, Room 734, Old South Buildings. Telephone Main 1024; Chicago, 405-6 Transportation 
Bldg., 608 So. Dearborn St.. Wabash 9430. 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE— Canada, £2.00 a year; Great Britain, South Africa, and West Indies, 8s. 6d- a year; 
United States, $2.50 a year; other countries. $3.00 a year. Single copies, 10 cents. Invariably in advance. 



10 Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February 15, 1923 

.^r^ - : 



The Seven O'Clock Whistle 

When the whistle blows in the morning: are your 
threading tools all set to go? 

Or must there be time wasted in adjustments and 
fussing and "getting ready"? 

Jardine Pipe Threading Tools are always ready 
— always on the job. They work smoothly, rapid- 
ly and accurately. They are light, compact, eas- 
ily handled and can be used in close quarters. 
They thread any type from %" to 12", inclusive, 
at one cut. 

At all Leading Supply Houses 



A, B. Jardine & 

Ontario West of Brockville 

W.' H. Cunningham & Hill, 
269 Richmond St. W., Toronto, Ont. 


Co., Limited, 

Brockville and East: 

J. R. Devereaux & Co., 
New Birks Bklg., Montreal, Que. 


Hespeler, Ontario 

Winnipeg and West 

Stanley Brock, Ltd., Winnipeg, Man., 
Calgary, Alta., Vancouver, B.C. 


SIGN AND 


MAIL THIS COUPON AND GET A 


CATALOGUE 




Sanitary Engineer 



C. & H. Tap Plugs 


C. & H. Boiler Cement 


C. & H. Pipe Joint Cement 


C & H. Tank Bulbs 


Hotstream Heaters 


C. & H. Hack Saw Blades 


C. & H. Bending Springs 


C & H. Bibb Washers 


Hercules D.P.S. 


W e have everything in Specialties 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd. 

269 RICHMOND STREET WEST TORONTO 

i! 



Made in Canada 




No. 2 Geared Threading Tool. 

Capacity 2V>" to 4." 



One Man Does the 
Work of Two 



Established 
1907 

Circulates 
Throughout 
Canada 




ivomcer 



Plumber and Steam fitter of Canada 



Published 
First 
and 
Fifteenth 
of Month 



VOL. XVII. 



TORONTO, FEBRUARY 15, 1923 



No. 



Plumber Had to Re-Order Certain Lines of 
Bathroom Fittings in Special Sale 

Direct Contact With Public Through the Shop Windows Used 
to Best Advantage — Uses Speed Truck for Small Jobs and 
Emergency Work — Keeping Goodwill of Customers in Collecting 
Accounts — Making the Customer Appreciate the Store 



THE growth of the plumbing firm 
of Band & Cole, in Ottawa, Ont., 
during the past year has been very 
noticeable and quite apparent to observ- 
ant citizens. Having been acquainted 
with the members of this firm for some 
years, Sanitary Engineer has been in- 
terested in noting its development, and 
it is but logical that the application of 
certain business methods followed by 
this firm in the last couple of years 
should have brought it to the place 
where its appearance is sufficiently in- 
viting and its methods so effective that 
a good business has been developed. 

The windows of the premises are al- 
ways well dressed, giving expression to 
seasonal tendencies in the buying of 
plumbing and heating equipment as far 
as this is possible. Every helpful sug- 
gestion is applied by this firm, such, for 
instance, as the display which is illus- 
trated in this article, and which was 
suggested in an issue of Sanitary En- 
gineer at Christmas. The firm keep an 
open mind for such suggestions and in- 
vestigate them as they apply to their 
particular trade. 

The interior consists of a neatly ar- 
ranged showroom and office. The ac- 
counting system and general methods of 
direction are modern and efficient and 
have been one of the chief foundations 
of its success. 

Direct Contact With Public 

Because direct contact with the public- 
can be achieved through the window dis- 
play, every care is taken to make it not 
only attractive but interesting. Pros- 
pective customers are invited by the win- 
dow display to come inside. Here 
through courtesy and intelligent treat 
~ment on the part of salesmen many prof- 
itable sales are developed. Thus the 
window display not only advertises the 
goods and sells some of them direct, but 
it enables the merchant plumber to come 
into close contact with prospects. 

A few weeks ago realizing the need 
of bathroom fittings in the home, a 



supply was purchased and put on dis- 
play. Within two weeks half the quan- 
tity purchased was sold and in some 
cases it was necessary to re-order cer- 
tain lines. In view of the fact that 
these fittings had not been stocked for 
eight years and that customers had been 
turned away to go elsewhere, the won- 
derful possibilities of window displays 
and advertising are evident. 

The prospects brought to the store in 
this way made many enquiries for en- 
amelled ware and several profitable 
sales resulted. The display of such ware 
caused such an impression that one lady 
remarked, "It is a good thing to see 
something so new and attractive in a 
plumbing store." This, Mr. Cole says, 
only goes to show that the public are 
noticing the transition which is taking 




W. CECIL COLE 

of the plumbing firm of Band & Cole, 
Ottawa, Ont., who tells of some helpful 
and interesting business building plans for 
plumbers. 



place in the appearance of plumbing- 
shops since the arrival of the modern 
domestic sanitary and heating engineer. 

Use Prospect List 

Prospect lists are compiled with care, 
divided into the various types of equip- 
ment in which the person is interested, 
and these are followed up vigorously. 
With a live mailing list available some 
direct influence of an important char- 
acter is brought to bear on all special 
efforts put forward tj sell equipment. 

In the management of the business 
the same care is shown as is exhibited 
in the window and its showroom. The 
office is neat and well arranged. An 
extensive system of accounting is kept 
and audited monthly. 

Efficiency and good management keep 
down the costs and increase the profits. 

Separate Bins 

In the workshop everything is in or- 
der and well marked. Every article 
is kept in a separate bin and everything 
arranged with the underlying idea of 
saving time and money. Everything is 
where it can be found quickly. The sav- 
ing annually both in time and material 
can be reckoned in many dollars, accord 
ing to Mr. Cole. 

Use Speed Truck 

Repairs are attended to promptly and 
a speed truck is always ready to trans- 
port men and material rapidly to and 
from each job. 

The experience of this firm bears out 
that of other sanitary engineers, name- 
ly, that a speedy service is necessary to 
secure emergency repair work in vari- 
ous parts of a city such as Ottawa, and 
that the use of such a truck keeps the 
time spent on such repairs to a mini- 
mum. It is only by keeping time and 
expense to such a minimum this work 
can be made profitable. Ordinarily the 
customer is reluctant to pay the plumber 
to do a comparatively small job in the 
house, judging the job not by the time 



12 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February 10. 1023 




Making use of all helpful ideas for the window display, (0 maintain constant contact with the public. Band & Cole, 
Ottawa, Ont., made use of the window display suggestion for a Christmas tree of bathroom fittings, which appeared 
in Sanitary Engineer. The idea was a success. Note the arrangement of other bathroom fittings, radiator humid- 
ifiers, sinks, laundry tubs, etc. A timely appeal is conveyed as far as possible in the constantly changing displays of 
this firm. Read what tangible results have been traced to these windows. 



consumed but by the value of material 
used. The speed truck used by Band & 
Cole has developed an active business in 
such work and it is made profitable. 
Handling Overdue Accounts 
Accounts are handled efficiently and 
with little cost. When an account is 
two months overdue the customer re- 
ceives a letter requesting payment in a 
courteous way and these letters are con- 
tinued each month until the account is 
payed or placed in a doubtful class. These 
letters are written in good faith and are 
written in such a manner as to give no 
offense. They not only drive in the 
money but they retain the goodwill of 
the customer. In this way collections 
are handled promptly and with little ex- 
pense and the maintenance cost kept very 
low. 

"Gradually the merchant plumber is 
coming into his own," said Mr. Cole, 
"and the plumber and steamfitter into 
his rightful place as a domestic sanitai-y 
and heating engineer. Soon the plumb- 
ing and heating industry will be univers- 
ally recognized as an industry which 
renders one of the greatest services to 
mankind, that of providing the best in 
sanitary heating, and ventilation, so that 
the peoples of the universe may enjoy 
the greatest of all gifts — health and 
comfort." 



Plumber Develops Filter Business 

N. C. McGowan, Plumbers of St. John, N.B., Con- 
ducts Propaganda Work With Boards of Health 
to Have Filters Installed in Swimming Pools 



ST JOHN, N. B.— N. C. McGowan, 
plumbing contractor of the St. John 
N. B., had been adovcating action 
whereby the plumbing contractors in 
each city and town would bene- 
fit materially. Mr. McGowan states 
there is at least one swimming pool ir. 
each city and town, and during the, warm 
weather months there are sunken scows, 
wharves, bath houses, beaches, flats, 
etc., devoted to bathing. 

There are pools which are as yet not 
equipped with filtration apparatus and 
Mr. McGowan believes that if the plumb- 
ing contractors went after the owners of 
these pools diligently and sought the or- 
ders for installation of filtration sys- 
tems, the owners would have the filters 
installed. He believes that many of the 
owners think the cost is much larger 
than it really is and consequently have 
failed to install the filtration systems in 
connection with pools. Mr. McGowan be- 
lieves that the Boards of Health in the 
cities and towns and districts should 
forbid the using of pools containing un- 
filtered water owing to the prevalence 



of germs in such water, particularly af- 
ter being in use several days or a week 
or perhaps two weeks. 

Then there is the question of the sunk- 
en scows, and the swimming beaches 
etc. Mr. McGowan points out that ii 
many instances the water for thes< 
places is impure, and is often near sew- 
age pipes. Mr. McGowan argues that th< 
plumbing contractors should petition th< 
city councils in the different cities an( 
towns agitating purification of th< 
water for these public bathing places 
He advocates the installation of spray: 
to be installed by plumbing firms, an< 
which would minimize the menace of thi 
germs in open waters. 

Mr. McGowan has been doing somi 
propaganda work on behalf of his pe ' 
ideas, and has taken up on his own ac 
count, the circularizing of owners of un 
filtered swimming pools, and offerinj 
to install pools at stipulated figures. H 
has received one order already and con 
siders himself repaid without going an; 
farther, for his work in advancing hi 
projects. * 



February 15, 



1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



13' 



A $200 Home Water Plant Sells Additional 
Equipment to the Value of $400 

Two Types of Power Pumps, i.e., Deep Well and Shallow Well 
— The Elevated Tank and Pneumatic Pressure Tank — Small 
Tanks Should be Galvanized — What to Look for in Good System 

Written for Sanitary Engineer by J. W. McCammon, Manager Pump and Electrical 
Dept., Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal 



THE extension of hydro-electric 
distributing systems through the 
country and the improved design 
and quantity production of gasoline en- 
gines, have within recent years placed 
a power operated water system within 
the reach of almost every householder in 
districts where municipal systems or 
gravity supplies are not available. 

The wide distribution of mechanical 
and electrical equipment in the form of 
gasoline engines, home lighting plants, 
automobiles, electric motors, etc., has 
familiarized the public with the use of 
apparatus and has clearly demonstrated 
the convenience, economy and comfort 
to be obtained by its use. 

There is no single piece of mechan- 
ical or electrical apparatus which is as 
necessary to life, health and happiness 
as a good pumping equipment, one which 
at all times will give a clean, conven- 
ient and reliable supply of water. 

Sell's Other Equipment 

Millions of dollars have to be spent 
in building up huge selling organiza- 
tions for the sale and distribution of 
gasoline engines and automobiles. An 
equal distribution of water systems may 
be made without any costly 7 distributing 
system, but through a country-wide or- 
ganization which already exists. Do 
plumbing and heating engineers realize 
the possibilities of this business, that 
with one-half the effort required to sell 
an automobile or an engine, they could 
instal a water system and all that goes 
with it, complete bathroom equipment, 
modern kitchen plumbing, etc., and that 
every house needs these much more than 
it does a car? It has been proved by 
plumbing engineers who have kept 
careful records, that with every $200.00 
home water plant sold by them, they 
have sold additional equipment amount- 
ing to S400.00. 

With this vast field for new business 
there is«every reason why plumbing and 
heating engineers should take advantage 
of it, especially as it requires no addi- 
tional capital in the form of money. 
Energy, and a little intelligent thought 
and study are all that are required. 

Experience indicates that in the past 
a great many pumping equipments have 
been sold which have not given satis- 
factory results. A knowledge of the 
different types of equipments, their ap- 
plication and limitations, will ensure 
satisfaction to both purchaser and seller. 



There are in general two types of power 
pumps: 

(a) Shallow Well. 

(b) Deep Well. 

(a) Shallow well pumping units are 
for use where the water level of the 
source of supply is not more than 20 
feet vertically below the ground level 
at the point where the pump is to be 
installed, i.e., the pump must be located 
not more than 20 feet above the water 
level of the source, whether it be a well, 
lake, cistern, spring or river. The hor- 
izontal distance of the pump from the 
source of supply is another considera- 
tion, most especially where the suction is 
high, i.e., nearly 20 feet. It is desirable 
that pumps should be located as near 
to the source of supply as possible. If 
it is not possible to place the pump near 
the source, the size of the suction pipe 
should be large, i.e., larger than the 
suction connection of the pump. In ex- 
treme cases where the suction lift is 
over 18 ft. and the horizontal distance 
greater than 100 ft., reference should 
be made to the manufacturer for rec- 
ommendation as to size of suction pipe 
to be used. Ninety-five per cent of 
pump troubles are due to improperly in- 
stalled suction lines as follows: 

(1) Suction lift too high (over 20 ft.) 

(2) Suction line too small. 

(3) Suction line leaks air. 

(4) Suction line contains air pockets. 

(5) Leaky or defective foot valve. 

(b) Deep well pumping units are used 
where the source of supply is a well 
either dug or drilled, where the surface 
of the water is more than 20 ft. below 
the ground level. With this type of 
equipment the pump cylinder is placed 
below the ground and usually below the 
water surface. The cylinder is then con- 
nected to the pump head by means of 
a drop pipe and a pump rod. Where this 
type of pump has to be used there are 
so many varying conditions such as: 

(1) Depth of water below surface. 

(2) Diameter of well, 

that standard equipments are not made 
and each individual case should be re- 
ferred to the manufacturer. 

Storage and distributing systems are 
of two kinds: 

(1) Elevated tank. 

(2) Pneumatic pressure tank. 

Elevated Tank 

The elevated tank has in the past been 
the favored system and in some in- 



stances is desirable. Primarily^ it is 
cheap, and presents no unfamiliar de- 
tails. As a general rule storage tanks 
have to be located in attics where they 
place unexpected loads on house timbers. 
They are liable to overflow and destroy 
ceilings and walls and the available head 
over faucets, etc., on the top floors is 
generally low, giving poor flow and very 
often complete stoppage due to air 
pockets and slight obstruction in pipe 
lines. 

The pneumatic pressure tank system 
gets away from all these troubles. The 
tank may be placed in the basement, a 
good pressure can always be maintained 
and a constant supply of freshly aerated 
water is always at hand. This system 
lends itself very readily to automatic 
control. If a reliable source of elec- 
tric power is available a small storage 
tank may be used giving a more nearly 
constant pressure and water will al- 
ways be fresh. This system is the one 
which is commonly used to-day and will 
in a very short time almost entirely re- 
place the older elevated tank system. 

How it Operates 

The sy r stem of operation is simply the 
pumping of air and water into a closed 
tank. The air being lighter than the 
water, rises to the top of the tank. As 
the tank fills, the air pressure on top of 
the water increases usually to 40 — 50 
lbs. per square inch, when pumping is 
stopped either by means of an automatic 
stop or by an attendant by hand. A 
pressure of 40 lbs. per square inch is 
sufficient to raise water to a vertical 
height of approximately 92 feet. As 
water is drawn from the bottom of the 
tank and forced by air pressure to the 
points desired, the air expands and con- 
tinues to exert a steadily decreasing 
pressure on the water. It is usually 
arranged that pumping should com- 
mence again when the pressure has 
reached a minimum of from 20 to 25 
lbs. per square inch. This again is con- 
trolled in the case of electrically operat- 
ed units by the automatic switch, or 
when hand operated or engne driven 
units are used is manually controlled. 

The air supply is provided for either 
by a shifting valve placed in one end 
of the pump cylinder or in the case of 
deep well units by an air compressor 
attached to the pumping head or a sep- 
arate air compressor. 

(Continued on page 28) 



14 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



February 15, 192: 




"We Launch a Prodigious 
Publicity Campaign" 



(Witfi apologies to Ring W^ardner) 

Major L.L.Anthes. 

Managing Director- Anthes Foundry Ltd. 



Tarraboome, Ont. 
Feb. 15, 1923 



Dear Friend Al: 



T 



HIS sellin gaim is a hot 1. I intymaited in 
my last affusion that we had lawnched a 
prudigeous publicity campane. The replize 
to our overatures were numerous. 

Some of theeze hear hicks along the back con- 
sessn. lions has got a hide like dubble plie oke- 
tannd beltin, & the passage-weigh to there pance- 
pokets is stittched with binder-twein — likewise 
there bank a'cs. 

Praps I never tolde you ov a job we done for 
an old ginney named Si Ensilage. Si was 1 of 
theze hear guys what had wiskers like a weapin 
wilier — youda sworre that they was birdes nests 
into em. 

Fer menny yearze Si had strugeled with the 
olde fambly washtubb on Sat. nites. 1 nite he 
backed up into a hot stove in his bearskin burnin 
a hoal in his etc. & coodent set down fer weex. 
Laiteron he set in a tubb of bilin water anuther 
nite & cot pheumony. After that Old Si was off 
washtubz fer life. He sent fer Bill 1 day wile he 
was converlessin & Bill put him in 1 of the swelest 
jobs in theze partz. Ever since Si hez bin a 
boostter fer our firm & moar than 1 rurial in- 
stalln. can bee trased to hiz ko-operation. 

Theirs annuther old hayseed naimed Si Low who 
livz abt. 1 ml. from Old Si & whooz so tite that 
he wares his wiskers fer a nek-tye. Hees lowzy 
with pelf but its abt. as eezy to get a $1 bill away 
from him as it is to get otter of rozes frm. a biled 
onyon. 

Well hee & Si ust 2 bee the klosest of frends in 
moar weighs than 1. Of coarse wen Old Si got in 
his plumbing fixtrs. & etc. the other Si (who I will 



spell Sigh to extinguish him from Old Si) was 1 
of the 1st to call on his old side-kick to look ovai 
the noo trimmins. Old Si was so gosh-derned 
prowd of hiz plumbing that he spent moast of hiz 
time at nites shown visiters arnd. the hous. 1 Sat. 1 
nite his nayber Sigh turnd up with a towl & ast 
Old Si if heed mind him takin a bath. "Shure," 
sez Old Si, ''go ahed." 

Sigh went ahed allrite & the saim the nxt Sat. 
nite & sew on fer a cupple of mnths. 

Finely it got Old Si's gote, & he infurred to Sigh 
that anuff was 2 much & in futr. he eld. bi a bath, 
ov hiz oan. 

Thus 1 of the cloasest of frendshps. on reckeredj 
was bust up on a c Old Si had got tirde of runneing. 
a publik bathing resorte. 

On cliff, occasns. after that we had seen this 
old hick Sigh snoopin arnd. our show windy but if 
he seen any 1 lookin at him he hiked off like aj 
dawg wat was expectin a kik. 

"Theirs a prospeck," sez Bill 1 day as we seeir 
Sigh peekin arnd. the corner of the windy. 

"Think so," sez I but withoute convictn. 

"He admitt heel bee a harrd 1," continyers Bill, 
"but its worth tryin." 

"Go ahed," I retalyiated, "you hev my best 
whishes." 

"Why not trie it yerselff," come back Bill not' 
lookin me in the i. 

"Yoove hed moar xperiance with hiks — look wot 
you dun with Old Si," I venchered seein as neether 
ov us was kean fer the onner. 

Vilet beginn to hum the corus from "Hee Never i 
Cairs to Wawnder Frm. His Oan Fierside." 

I feltt sorta giltie like & I sez to Bill ; "I tel you 
wat weal doo — weal tos as to hoo takles Sigh." I 
perduced a coyne & spunn it in the airr, sayin at 
the saime time, "Tales I winn heds you looze." 

"No you dont," sez Bill, "weal match. - ' 



February 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



If. 



So I come to him & then he come to me but the 
lastt time I dident come so I was alected the gote 
to put ovar the deal. 

But Ime gaim wen 1 get my bak to the wal — you 
know me Al. 

Sew 1 fine starrlite nite I mounted the old lizzie 
& hoofed it over to Sighs hoam on the 4th concessn. 
It was set up on a hill & was a fien sustanchial 
lookin brick aboad. It was 1 of the best farrms 
in this sectn. bein wel draned & good riche land. 
Their was a big up-to-dait barn on the plaice & it 
was ann ideel subjek fer a 1st klass plumbing & 
heating job. 

I had fortyfide miself with sum segars what the 
smoak testin macheen peeple had sent at Xmas 
time allso sum chooing gumm in caise Sigh didn. 
smoak. 

I hung arnd. the frunt gait fer a wile like a 
bachfull luvver as I wernt nun 2 shoor ov my 
wellcum wen I shld. annonce miself. 

Its all verry 
well to starrt 
out 2 sell a 
plumbing outfitt 
but the pinch is 
how to brake 
jthe eyce wen yer 
goin to run up 
agenst a ornery 
old skinflynt tit- 
ter nor a turkey 
! — not on a 
jbroaken arterie. 
Wen I got to the 
gait my enthus- 
iasm begin to 
meltt away like 
buter on a hot 
stoav. I stoode 
skratching 1 kaff 
with the tow of 
the uther tryin 
to figger out the 
best lion of doap 
to pull with the 
pld tiewadd. 

"Hi, wat yer 
d o i n their," 
came a voyce 
outta the missty 
twylite. 

I- "Oh good 
nite," I sez af- 
fable like, "Mr. 
Low I bleeve?" 
"Well thats 




'One nite he backed up into a hot 
sit down for 



me weather you bleeve it or not," he snapped like 
a starvin dawg back of a slotter hous. 

"I thowt Ide drop in & sea you," I sez not jest 
shure what I was sayin. 

"Wats yer bizness," he comes back, "I aint buyin 
no books." 

"Oh, Ime not sellin books," I retortures, tryin to 
think up somethin to say. 

"Wot yer got under yer arrm," he snaps pointin 
to my cattalogs as if they was tea n. tea. 

"Oh them," I sez effecting an ayr of nonchallons, 
"O theys cattalogs & desines." 

"I aint byin nothin," he sez with an ayr of finelty. 

"& Ime not sellin nothin," I shot back quick. 
"I jist want to leeve some of theeze kutz with you." 

"You kin keep yer kutz," he snarls. "I dont 
trust peebles wat wants to give you somethin fer 
nothin." 

The situration was gettin tents. He shurr was 
a kas hardnd. old nutt. 

With despera- 
shun I plunged 
in. "Ime a 
plumber." 

"Ha," snorter- 
ed the old hogg- 
herder, "I thot 
you lookd like a 
crooke." 

"Thems harsh 
words Maggie," 
I remarkd with 
dignitie. "A 
plumber can bee 
a gentleman, I 
hoap." 

"Well yed 
bettr abanddon 
yer fawlse 
hoaps," cam the 
coal d-bludded 
sentence like a 
juddge condem- 
ning a . wife- 
murrderar. 

I leeve it 2 
you Al — it was 
Wurse than tryin 
to maik a um- 
pire revearse his 
decisn. 

"Aint you in- 
te rested in 
plumbing?" I 
ast, bringing 

Continued on P. 29 



stove in his bearskin and couldn't 
a week." 



16 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February 15, 1923 



Price Cutting Easier than Selling 

But Morale of Plumbing Business Has Been Affected by Con- 
tinuous Price Cutting — An Epidemic of Spinelessology — Bids on 
a Job Range From $245 to $322.50 

Written for Sanitary Engineer by Kenneth B. Allison 
(Continued from last issue) 



DURING the year just closed I have 
given considerable time to the com- 
pilation of figures which would 
be authentic so that any statements I 
made would be considered as such, rather 
than the exaggeration of someone seek- 
ing a little cheap notoriety. 

We will discuss the plumbing of the 
average small house and, so that the 
figures I give here may be intelligently 
understood by those operators who, in 
other territories, use different material 
or a different installation method, I will 
enumerate the job. 
The fixtures are: 

1 — 5-foot enameled iron bath on feet 
with 3-in. roll rim and fitted with IMi-in. 
NP combination bath waste and overflow 
of 19 Imp. gauge %-in. N.P. brass full 
iron pipe size supplies for hot and cold 
water, and N.P. quick compression bath 
cocks with plain or sometimes indexed 
handles. 

1 — Enameled iron flat-back lavatory 
with apron, 18 in. x 21 in. or approxi- 
mate in size, having 1%-in. N.P. 19 Imp. 
gauge trap — plain P if to wall and 
vented S if to floor, %-in. N.P. brass 
supplies (unless supplies can be brought 
out from wall clear up to basin) N.P. 
quick compression indexed handle basin 
faucets. 

1 — Low-down closet combination con- 
sisting of wash-down bowl, oak tank 
with 10-oz. copper lining, also ballcock 
and syphon; wood strip seat, N.P. brass 
supply and flush; brass and rubber floor 
flange and bolts. 

1 — 18 x 30 enameled iron roll rim 
one-piece sink with back; N.P. quick 
compression sink bibbs; lead trap. 

1 set of 2 division cement laundry- 
trays; cements legs with four compres- 
sion bibbs. 

The soilpipe is medium weight with a 
three-foot footing and carried up to 
three feet above any window within 
twenty feet, flashed at roof with 5-lb. 
sheet lead at least 20 in. x 20 in. 

All fixtures are vented. All lead waste 
and traps are 8 lb. weight. All vents 
are galvanized iron pipe and fittings. 
Water closets are local vented to heated 
flue. Half-inch lead water service is 
laid in trench provided from street line 
to inside front wall of house. Roughing- 
in is water tested and finished work 
smoke tested. 

What the Job is Worth 

This job is worth three hundred and 
thirty five to three hundred and sixty 



dollars of the public's money and there 
is no overcharge at that figure. 

The material alone, closely estimated, 
will cost an average of two hundred and 
thirty-five dollars and these figures do 
not include the little odds and ends, or 
making good of defects, etc., which in 
other lines of business are figured at 
another ten per cent. 

They say that there are one-man- 
working-boss shops who do these jobs 
in five days, if any of those fellows want 
a job I will deposit their full year's pay 
in advance against their regular weekly 
pay withdrawals and give them a year's 
contract — that is how much I think of 
their speed. 

But the average run of mechanics take 
eight to ten days, and I have among 
this year's figures as high as fifteen 
days. Take your pick, and add the la- 
bour cost on to the material cost and 
show me howinsamhill a regular honest 
to goodness operator can meet two hund- 
red and fifty five dollar competition — 
yes sir, two hundred and fifty five dol- 
lars for the job previously enumerated 
in this article. 

Give Customer Donation 

It seems to me that it would pay some 
of you folks to slip your customer 




Plumbing operators are worse 
off for price cutting. An Epe- 
demic of Spinelessology. 



twenty five dollars and tell him that 
that is your donation towards the build- 
ing of his house and then beat it for 
home and spend your time knitting socks. 

I have seen material and labour costs 
of some of these jobs go as high as three 
hundred and sixty one dollars and sixty 
five cents (too high I will admit) and I 
have checked lots of material costs alone 
which showed up to two hundred and 
forty six dollars when the incidentals 
were taken care of. 

Recently a block of bungalows 
brought out over a dozen plumbing bids. 
These jobs were similar to the previous 
one mentioned except that there was an 
enameled sink and laundry tray combin- 
ation in place of the usual sink in the 
kitchen and double cement laundry tray 
in the basement. The combination fix- j 
ture costs more than the two fixtures se- j 
parately but there is a saving in the j 
roughing-in labour and material. As 
one of the craft will you make such ad- 
justment mentally as will take care of 
this difference and then read here that 
the prices ranged from three hundred 
and twenty two dollars and fifty cents j 
down to two hundred and forty five dol- 
lars. 

Another sad feature is that the fellow 
with the low price has publicly damned 
his fellow competitors for being price 
cutters. 

I am afraid to give vent to my feelings 
because this article would only be 
thrown out because of foul language, 
but I can sympathize with the man who 
becomes an extremist because it seems 
that only extreme and very drastic ac- 
tion will awaken most folks to condi- 
tions. 

Have to be Very 111 First 

You know a lot of folks have to be 
dangerously ill before they want to act 
like Christians and then what a rush 
they make in case they should croak be- 
fore they have a chance to show how 
good they really are. 

Nineteen-twenty-two was a good year 
for business but the morale of the 
plumbing business was all shot by price- 
cutting. 

Price cutting started with the whole- 
saler. Let us see why it did not stop 
there. 

The average plumber reasoned it out 
that if eleven supply dealers had to 
price-cut bel~w sound business practice 
then what chance had he, the plumber, 
with an apparently less efficient, and 



February 15, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



17 



naturally smaller organization, to get 
business in say, the city of Toronto, with 
some three hundred and fifty competi- 
tors on the trail, any one of whom might 
become competition with or without no- 
tice. 

Because of price cutting, wholesalers 
require about 3.5 per cent, of their over- 
head to pay interest charges due in large 
measure to slow payment accounts. 

A manufacturer sells his product to 
' the trade at a certain discount off o. a 
i list and from this discount he allows one 
additional discount to the wholesaler so 
that he, the manufacturer, may have a 
; greater number of distributing points, 
! a greater number of salesmen, and there- 
j for increased output by means of these 
wholesale house connections. 

The problem rests right at home with 
you. It is for you as a business man to 
say, that, having realized the preferen- 
tial you have is not any too great, you 
cannot afford, nor will you ever consider, 
having to part with it. 

Almost daily does the question come 
to my mind — "What is your position as 
a human being in life?" 

What is Your Duty? 

What is your duty to your fellow be- 
ings ? What is expected of you if you 
are to do your part towards the progres- 
sion of the world, or of your country or 
your city, or of your calling or your own 
business, or of your own family, or of 
yourself? 

Perhaps the Big Brother movement, or 
the Big Sister movement, or the de- 
velopment of the under-privileged boy 
has had its good effect in awakening one 
to their position in life. 

If, as an ordinary human being, cer- 
tain things become my duty then logical- 
ly those same things should become the 
duty of the other ordinary human beings. 

Perhaps in the past we have taken 
our own duty too lightly, have taken 
things for granted and have failed to 
do our duty in the past by not giving 
our efforts toward the development of 
others. 

I am in business. A customer calls 
on me to do a piece of work. My in- 
terest therein is not one simply of sat- 
isfying the need of the moment, charg- 
ing an amount that returns me a profit 
and collecting my money. 

There is more to this problem of pro- 
gressive living than barter and exchange. 
I think that it is essential that, when 
someone wants to become a debtor of 
mine, that I should be satisfied that 
they are able to fufill in all particulars 
their part of the agreement, either 
written or implied. I think too that 
when I want to become a creditor of 
theirs that they are entitled to the same 
knowledge as to my ability to complete 
in all detail my portion of that agree- 
ment. 

It appears almost self evident that in 
addition to one being sure of their debt- 



ors they must be equally sure of their 
creditors. 

A Retrogression 

The failure of a master plumber or 
the failure of a supply house is a retro- 
gression to the whole industry. What- 
ever the financial loss is that is incurred 
in those failures, it must be saddled on 
as an extra burden to those who are left. 

I and you, whether we be supply deal- 
ers or plumbing operators, are vitally in- 
terested in the success of each one con- 
nected in the industry, and I and you as 
buyers are entitled to know that the 
concern or concerns with whom we deal 
are making a profit and making pro- 
gress as a result of our buying else, as 
they cannot remain stationary, they must 
be incurring a loss and a loss to anyone 



USE OF GENERATOR 

Question. — Please advise if the Honey- 
well generator is still on the market or 
are other generators on the market. Do 
they improve hot water systems and are 
many of them used? Which is the best 
hot water system and cheapest to instal ? 
The old gravity 2 pipe system with se- 
parate flow and separate return pipes 
lor the ground floor or the so-called 
Honeywell small pipe system with gen- 
erator? Which will heat up first and 
which requires least fuel? 

Moist Air Furnace Co., Ltd., Ottawa. 

Answer. — Your letter of Jan. 29th 
contains some very interesting questions 
and to answer these we will refer to 
your letter paragraph by paragraph. 

1st. The Honeywell heat generator is 
still on the market to the best of our 
knowledge. The firm still conducts an 
establishment at Wabash, Indiana. Our 
records of many years ago tell us that 
you installed quite a lot of Honeywell 
systems in Ottawa. Hence we would as- 
sume that you were closer in touch with 
the pros and cons than we are, but we 
believe that the accelerated systems of 
hot water heating is much preferable 
than the "Old 2 pipe gravity jobs." 

2nd and 3rd. As there are scores of 
methods that can be adopted in the in- 
stallation of hot water heating all of 
which are good according to prevailing 
conditions we would not care to express 
our opinion as to which system is the 
best. 

4th. There isn't any doubt about the 
fact that an accelerated system creates 
a more active circulation, and under ef- 
ficient management will give off a larger 
amount of heat per lb. of coal consumed. 
But unless care is exercised in installing 
any hot water job there is likely to be 
trouble 



in the industry is a loss to every one 
else in the industry. 

Is it possible therefore for me to pray, 
beseech, exhort, chastise, or blaspheme 
those connected with this industry to 
take stock right now, not alone of the 
ware on their shelves but, of their busi- 
ness good-will and of themselves as hu- 
man beings that they may find out if 
they have progressed during the year 
just passed and are therefore an asset to 
the community, or if, in sheer stupidity 
and insanity they have, by price cutting, 
helped to wreck an industry and be- 
come worse than dead stock to the com- 
munity? 

Let us see ahead, and plan, and act to 
avoid future difficulties rather than later 
on becoming an indignation committee 
when the holocaust is over. 



HOW TO CLEAN SHOPSOILED 
VALVES 

Editor, Sanitary Engineer: We have 
just finished taking an inventory of our 
stock and other worldly goods, part of 
which are a lot of new brass valves, 
checks, brass fittings and supplies of 
various kinds. 

These goods have never been used, 
yet do not look just as good from con- 
sumer's standpoint. Is there any way 
to clean these goods up so as to give 
them the freshness they had when we 
bought them? We have tried washing 
them and using polishing powders and 
other cleaning fluids, but all to no pur- 
pose, that is, the goods do not have the 
appearance we would like them to have. 
(Signed) Shop Soiled Brass Goods. 

Replying to the above question re 
cleaning brass valves, etc., would say 
that this can easily be done. One or 
two precautions must be taken. Be 
sure and remove all valve discs, all 
packing; loosen up and take apart every 
piece, for the simple reason that some 
of the acids, mentioned below, are liable 
to get into crevices in the valves and 
not easily drain out. This would set 
up corrosion and likely damage the in- 
terior parts. 

The following dips and solutions will 
give the desired results: 

Having taken goods apart, attach 
wire or hooks to same, then immerse in 
boiling hot water, containing caustic 
soda, about one pound a gallon. Then 
dip in clean hot water, and repeat these 
operations once or twice. This will re- 
move the grease. Next, make up a solu- 
tion of 4 parts hot water, 2 parts nitric 
acid and 1 part Salammoniac. Leave 
goods in for a few moments, then take 
out and dip in hot, clean water. While 
the goods are hot rub well in box of fine 
sawdust until dry. 



THE QUESTION BOX 



IS 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



February 15, 1923 



Rural Sewage Disposal Systems 

Water Allowance Per Person — Its Importance — How Figures 
Were Determined — Danger in Making Allowance Too Great — 
Water Not to be Conserved at the Cost of Cleanliness — Why 
Cultivating Chamber Requires to be Larger Than Dosing Chamber 

Written for Sanitary Engineer by Edwin Newsome, Consulting Sanitary and 

Heating Engineer 



THE concluding paragraphs of the 
article which appeared in the Jan- 
uary 15th issue of the Sanitary 
Engineer referred to the water allowance 
per person, occupying a house. Where 
a septic tank and disposal field tile area 
is in operation, and, realizing that the 
quantity of water being discharged with 
a septic tank is important and particu- 
larly seeing that where a septic tank is 
installed, the water allowance has a most 
important bearing upon the proper 
workings of it, the readers require to 
have no misgiving as to why the figures 
given in previous articles were used as 
a basis upon which to determine the size 
of a septic tank. 

For example, all the drawings, both 
plans and elevations were drawn and 
prepared, and sizes given in such plans, 
were based upon a water allowance per 
day of 27 gallons per person. The writ- 
er has many times had these figures 
questioned. By some the allowance was 
said to be too low, by others too high, 
and while it was stated that when cer- 
tain types of water supply systems were 
in operation, the allowance could be re- 
duced. Yet the figures given were ar- 



rived at after many practical experiences 
and much research work being conducted. 

It is not necessary to quote more than 
a few instances to prove the figures pre- 
viously given and to assure the reader 
that those figures are reliable and 
worthy of consideration and confidence. 

Proving the Figures 

In one city for example, a very care- 
ful survey was made of 2,553 families, 
the total number of persons numbered 
12,765 living in the houses, each house 
was metered and every gallon of water 
was accounted for which passed through 
the meters. That is, no flat rates or 
certain bulk allowances made for cer- 
tain periods of the year, but each meter 
was set at zero and every gallon count- 
ed in. 

It will be noted that the figures show 
that the total number, 12,765, works out 
at an average of 5 persons per family, 
and, by the way these people resided in 
various part of the city. Some in high 
c'.ass and wealthy residential districts. 
Some in middle class districts and some 
in the poor localities of the city. The 
work of measuring this water was spread 



over a period of one year exactly, and 
the figures are astounding. 

167 families used only 6.15 gallons per 
perscn per day. 

237 families used only 8.20 gallons 
per person per day. 

361 families only used 10.25 gallons 
per person per day. 

445 families used only 12.30 gallons 
per person per day. 

446 families used only 14.35 gallons 
per person per day. 

462 families only used 16.40 gallons 
per person per day. 

435 families only used 18.27 gallons 
per person per day. 

Those figures work out at about 12% 
to 13 gallons of water per person per 
day. But there is another condition to 
be considered which will justify the al- 
lowance of 27 gallons per person per 
day which the writer advises. 

The average city dweller takes advan- 
tage of sanitary laundries, people liv- 
ing in a rural district do not patronize 
outside laundries to the same extent. The 
average city dweller works away from 
home, in offices, factories, etc., etc., and 
the daily consumption would likelv have 



Plan With §/fie Of depfic Jan/t ba/Mb/e ForMot/sp 0cci/J?/ee/ 
3y Twe/i/e (/ 2) Persons . 




fecieviny OrCulfwahny 
Chom ber. 



DoS'nq Of Sjjbhan 
C hamt>er. 



/o " 



February 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



19 



Size And Dimensions of Septic Tank Suitable For House Occupied B y 

(6) S/OC Persons 




&&4Jt?8. Six ZnchesThicH ^ ^§10^ ~ *~ 

Total Width o f Se ptic Tank 5'+" Total Len gfh IVJWj 



been somewhat greater, if living condi- 
tions were similar to rural or farm life. 
The average person living in a city takes 
a wash several times a day, and so will 
a farmer, or his folk, if water is on tap 
24 hours a day. But the water not con- 
sumed or otherwise used at home by a 
city dweiler would not be taken into 
consideration as would have to be in the 
case o: the farmer, so that to add 50 
per cent, or so as the allowance for a 
rural home would not be out of the way. 

A Case in Point 

Another proof that our figures can be 
taken as a reliable basis upon which to 
determine the size and other details for 
a septic tank may be cited in the case of 
a house occupied by a friend of the writ- 
ers. The water supply is metered, an 
allowance of 1,666 cubic feet of water is 
made for a period of six months and over 
and above that amount is charged for at 
so much per 1000 cubic feet. By work- 
ing out these figures it was found that 
the normal allowance of 1,666 cubic feet 
of water per six months, gave each per- 
son about 7% gallons per day per person. 
The house is occupied by 8 persons. 

But during the months of June to 
November inclusive, the total consump- 
tion for that family was actually 4,998 
cubic feet, so it will be noted that the 
daily amount of water used for all pur- 
poses, worked out at approximately 23 
gallons per person. During the 6 winter 
months, December to May, both months 
inclusive, the consumption of water drop- 
ped down to approximately 15 gallons 
per person per day. This family how- 
ever has access to outside laundry work 
and very little family washing is done. 

The writer found upon investigation 
that these figures given above were ap- 



proximately correct for the whole town, 
so that it can be plainly seen that they 
are reliable and can be used as a fair 
basis upon which to arrive at the size 
of a septic tank. That is why we find 
the allowance of 27 gallons per person 
per day to be fair. 

Too Great an Allowance Dangerous 

And now to consider what would take 
place if too great an allowance of water 
is made when arriving at the size of r<ny 
septic tank. 

Let us assume that provisions have 
been made to take care o? an allowance 
of 50 gallons of water per person per day 
and again let us assume thar, six per- 
sons are going to occupy the house. The 
first mistake would be the unnecessary 
cost of the installation, but this, by no 
means is the most serious, a dosing 
chamber, in which a syphon is fitted 
would require to discharge the full 
allowance of 300 gallons every 24 hours 
and 600 lineal feet of field tile would 
have to be provided, thus also requiring 
a larger area in which to lay the pipe. 

Next, if a system such as mentioned 
only received say 27 gallons of fluid per 
person per day. It would not operate 
much more frequently than once in every 
45 hours or so instead of every 24 hours. 
Therefore the sewage would be held back 
too long a period in the cultivating cham- 
ber and the bacteria, not having suffi- 
cient new raw sewage solids to work 
upon, would become languid as it were, 
lose life and finally become putrid, a 
condition to be avoided by all means. 

And almost the same condition would 
take place in the disposal field piping. 
In the summer there would not be suffi : 
cient moisture to keep the bacteria in a 
healthy state, and in the winter this con- 



dition would lead to trouble from freez- 
ing, because, the frequent, predeter- 
mined, intermittent discharge of sewage 
keeps the tile area warm and free from 
frost and there are just as many argu- 
ments against a system being too small 
for the allowance made. 

Disposal Systems Made Too Small 

The above reasons quoted against too 
large an allowance of water are no more 
important than would be the case where 
too small allowance is provided. For 
example we find that 27 gallons per 
person per day is advisable and say 
only 15 gallons were provided along with 
a septic tank and disposal area. Say 
also that 6 persons are to occupy the 
house. Here is what we find, the total 
amount of water actually used is 162 
gallons, requiring 324 lineal feet of 4 
inch field tile, and the septic tank is only 
large enough to handle 90 gallons of 
fluid per day, the field tile 180 lineal 
feet, and, let us assume too that the 
ground is inclined to be clay loam, the 
syphon will discharge nearly twice every 
24 hours. The bacteria in the cultivat- 
ing chamber will have no opportunity to 
break down the solids and the effluent 
entering the dosing chamber will con- 
tain too much solid matter in suspension. 

Not only will the disposal bed be over- 
worked, but the field tile will very soon 
be filled up with partially broken down 
solids resulting in a very undesirable 
condition as well as unsanitary. 

The reader must not, however, be of 
the opinion that water must be conserved 
at the expense of cleanliness. That is the 
last thought which the writer has in 
mind. But seeing that such a lot of 
work has been done in this connection, 
(Continued on page 36) 



20 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February 15, 1923 



Rating of Furnaces Must be Based on Register 
Temperature as Well as Leader Pipe Area 

Professor Willard Makes It Plain Why the Latter is Not a Safe 
Guide as to Furnace Capacity 

By A. C. Willard, Professor of Heating and Ventilation and Head of Department of 
Mechanical Engineering, University of Illinois 



ONE of the most important objects 
of the research work of the Warm 
Air Furnace Heating Investiga- 
tion, which is now in progress at the 
University of Illinois, has been the de- 
termination of the factors affecting the 
rating of a warm air furnace. Every 
manufacturer is vitally concerned with 
the basis upon which furnace ratings are 
determined. Most manufacturers are 
agreed that the square inches of leader 
pipe area which a furnace can supply is a 
satisfactory basis for expressing the 
heating capacity of a furnace. Unfor- 
tunately, this is not the end of the story 
by any means, as such a basis of rating 
is still indefinite, unless the air temper- 
ature at the registers is also stated. 

The real significance of this air tem- 
perature at the registers can be shown 
very easily by reference to any series of 
tests run at the University on piped fur- 
naces. In fact, it is a very simple mat- 
ter to show that a given furnace, con- 
nected to a given system of leaders, 
stacks, and registers as shown in Figure 
1 can be made to develop several differ- 
ent heating capacities when operating 
with the same number of square inches 
of leader pipe area. It is only necessary 
to increase the draft, thereby burning 
more coal per square foot, of grate, and 
as a consequence secure a higher air 
temperature at the register face. That 
the heating capacity of the furnace will 
be increased by such a procedure is ob- 
vious to anyone, and it should be equal- 
ly obvious that any attempt to express 
the rating of a furnace in square inches 
of leader pipe area means nothing unless 
the register temperature is stated at the 
same time. 

In order to illustrate just how im- 
portant this item of air temperature at 
the registers really is, the results of 
three tests on the piped furnace plant 
(Figure 1) are presented in Figure 2 
and analyzed. Absolutely no changes 
were made in the furnace or plant dur- 
ing these tests. In the right hand half 
of the figure each inclined line repre- 
sents one test; the lowest line shows 
the results from a test with the air tem- 
peratures at the registers for the three 
floors averaging 141.2 deg. F., the mid- 
dle line is taken from a test with an 
average register temperature of 175.8 
deg. F., and the upper line represents 
the results of a test with an average reg- 
ister temperature of 197.5 deg. F. The 



•la 



8 




'■Stack JS 'higi> 



-/o' wide — 
3rd. Floor 



Dimensions of Opening 
Free Area 0.456 sq 



2nd. Floor 



Switch Board 



Dimensions of Open 
\ ing //,%'x/ei 

— free Area 
0.634sg./r 




Figure / — Sectional Elevation of Piped Furnace Testing Plant. 



horizontal axis indicates the height of produced in the room per square inch of 
the register above the grate in feet, and leaded pipe area. 

the vertical axis gives the heating effect For example, during the first or low 



21 



temperature test, each square inch of 
leader pipe to the first floor registers 
supplied 50 B. t. u. per hour for useful 
heating effect in the rooms, each square 
inch of leader pipe to second floor regis- 
ters supplied 89 B. t. u. per hour for use- 
ful heating effect in the rooms, and 
each square inch of leader pipe to third 
floor registers supplied 122 B. t. u. per 
hour for useful heating effect in the 
rooms. At this time the draft was 0.05 
inches of water and the combustion rate 
was 3.8 pounds of coal per square foot 
of grate. 

By merely increasing the draft to 0.14 
inches of water, the combustion rate in 
the second test increased to 5.6 pounds 
of coal per square foot of grate and the 
average air temperatures at the regis- 
ters became 175.8 deg. F. This raised 
the useful heat carrying capacity of each 
square inch of leader pipe for the first 
floor from 50 to 103 B. t. u. per hour, 
for the second floor from 89 to 153 B. t. 
u. per hour, and for the third floor from 
122 to 204 B. t. u. per hour. A further 
increase of the draft to 0.61 inches of 
water gave a still higher combustion! 
rate of 6.5 pounds per square foot of 
grate and correspondingly greater heat 
carrying capacities for each square inch 
of leader as shown in the upper curve of 
the right hand half of Figure 2. 

The left hand half of Figure 2 shows 
the air velocities in the leaders to each 
floor for each test. A glance at the 
curves (each curve represents one test) 
will show that the velocity and hence the 
quantity of air delivered was materially 
increased each time the register temper- 
ature was increased, hence an increase 
in register temperature not only adds 



more heat to each pound of air supplied 
at the registers, but also increases the 
number of pounds of the hotter air which 
is supplied. In all cases the leader area 
was the same. 

It is also possible to determine exactly 
just what effect the changes in air tem- 
perature at the registers has had on the 
heating capacity of this furnace and 
plant. The first floor leader area is 4 
X 113= 452 square inches, the second 
floor leader area is 2 X 50 -f 2 X 64 
= 228 square inches, and the third floor 
leaders area is 2 X64 — 128 square 
inches, or a total of 808 square inches. 
The free area of the furnace is 838.4 
square inches. Hence this furnace de- 
veloped the following useful heating 
capacities (that is, heat supplied at reg- 
isters for heating rooms at 70 deg. F.) in 
each of the three tests: 

Te&t Number 1. 

Register temperature = 141.2 deg. F. 
(Draft — 0.05 inches and combustion 
rate = 3.8 pounds per square foot of 
grates.) 

452 X 50 = 22,600 
228 X 89 = 20,300 
128 X 122 = 15,600 



58,500 B. t. u. per hour 
Test Number 2. 

Register temperature = 175.8 deg. F. 
(Draft = 0.14 inches and combustion 
rate = 5.6 pounds per square foot of 
grate.) 

452 X 103 = 46,600 
228 X 153 = 34,900 
128 X 204 = 26,100 



Test Number 3. 

Register temperature = 197.5 deg. F. 
(Draft = 0.16 inches and combustion 
rate = 6.5 pounds per square foot of 
grate.) 

452 X 134 = 60,500 
228 X 168 = 38,400 
128 X 243 = 31,000 



107,600 B. t. u. per hour 



130,000 B. t. u. per hour 

By merely increasing the draft and 
combustion rate the register tempera- 
ture rate has been raised from 141.2 
deg. to 197.5 deg. F., and the heat capac- 
ity has been increased from 58,500 to 
130,000 B. t. u. per hour, or an increase 
of 122 per cent., but the free area 
through the furnace and the leader pipe 
area has remained the same. 

It should, therefore, be apparent that 
the rating of any furnace in square 
inches of leader pipe area means nothing 
unless the air temperature at the regis- 
ters is also definitely stated at the same 
time. The preceding discussion is in no 
sense an agreement against rating on 
the free air basis, but rather an argu- 
ment to show the manufacturer and in- 
staller the vital importance of fixing up- 
on some standard register temperature, 
so that ratings in square inches of leader 
pipe area will be definite and can be 
made comparable and understandable by 
both the manufacturer and the engineer. 
The Advisory Committee on Furnace Re- 
search of the National Warm Air Heat- 
ing and Ventilating Association has re- 
cently approved a maximum register 
temperature of 180 deg. F. for warm air 
furnace heating systems. 



§J40 

^ 300 
£280 



Z60 
240 
220 
200 
180 
160 
140 
t20 



I 



too 



Effect of he/ghr of regis fer above 
grate on vefoc/fy of air ffow, of vo-rf- 
Ot/s register tempera fares 


^260 
\ 

§240 
■^220 
\200 

a teo 
1 

^ /40 

\ tzo 

h 1,00 

\ 80 
\ 

*> 40 
20 


Effect of height of reg/ster c 
grate on heaffng capacity per . 
inch of feeder per hour 


7/>Ok 
SOUC 


e 

*re 


























































u 


















91 
























— -^i 












































f- 








, l 












\ °- 


A 




































t< 

(p -j 








































& 







cr 














A 








































A 






























l • 






































































% 










!- 












X 


















f 














1- 






























i 




v. 
1 










i 








l 





6 8 10 12 14 /6 



18 20 22 24 26 6 8 JO /2 

Heiahf of Reaister above Crate in Feet 



i4 16 18 20 22 24 26 



Figure 2 — Charts Showing Effect of Height Above Crate Upon Velocity of Air Flow and Heating Capacity. 



22 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February 15, 1923 




Mueller Pumping 
Systems, 



Mr. Plumber, can be installed with confidence that their satisfactory 
operation at all times is an assured fact — guesswork is eliminated. 

Compact — durable — efficient, the system will last a life-time without 
repairs or replacements. Under test a MUELLER Pumping System 
has pumped over a million gallons, equivalent to over thirty years' av- 
erage service, with no attention other than occasional oiling, and is 
STILL GOING STRONG. The product of years of study, the Mueller 
Pump with but one moving part is without a peer. NO GEARS, 
NO VALVES, NO BELTS, NO CAMS, NO SPRINGS, NO PIS- 
TONS, NO IDLERS, NO FLYW HEEL, NO COUPLING — these 
features make it possible for the M ueller Pump to give such service 
and satisfaction as has never before been realized. An added feature 
of the Mueller System is that drinking water is pumped direct from the 
well, and not from a storage tank. 

The Suburban and Rural Markets have been scarcely touched — the op- 
portunities are wonderful — Mr. Plumber, get your share of the busi- 
ness! And — on every job instal a Mueller Pumping System along 
with Mueller plumbing goods. It will mean satisfaction to your cus- 
tomer and Reputation for yourself. 



Descriptive Literature and Prices 
Gladly Furnished on Request. 



H. MUELLER MFG.D 




February LJ>, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



2:; 




Mueller. A life-time of service built into every system. Full details on request. 

OMPANY LIMITED 

MARIO 



24 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February 15, 1923 



Plumber an^^^am^^^)f Canada 

ESTABLISHED 1907 

Member Audil Bureau of Circulations 
PUBLISHED TWICE MONTHLY BY 

The MacLean Publishing Company, Limited 

Montreal TORONTO, CANADA Winnipeg 



Vol. XVII. FEBRUARY 15, 1923 No. 4 



Modem Plumbing Essential in Homes 

TV/fODERN plumbing is the science which gives the modern 
home comforts and conveniences which put to shame the 
homes of wealth and splendor of former years, and which 
safeguards the health of the family and works hand in hand 
with medical science in the prevention of disease. 

Modern plumbing is not merely a net work of concealed 
pipes, valves and fittings, supplying a few fixtures with 
water, but it is an ideal — an ideal of comfort with economy, 
beauty with utility, finish with durability. It has given the 
cottage of to-day better fixtures than are to be found in the 
mansions of 20 years ago. 

Modern plumbing teaches us how to live and puts the 
means within the reach of every family. It has carried its 
tenets to the small village and to the farm. It has conquered 
stubborn opposition in its efforts to better living conditions. 
It has made the factory a source of pride to its owner and a 
model of cleanliness and sanitation to the employees. It has 
raised the standard of living throughout the land. It has es- 
tablished a greater difference between this and other coun- 
tries than any other one thing in the daily life of the people. 

People select the furnishings of various rooms with infinite 
care. But how often do they pass over the equipment of their 
bathrooms and their plumbing in general, with a shrug? And 
how much more important it is that the bathroom be properly 
equipped, though judiciously, there. Plumbing fixtures are 
used every day. They are not to be shifted about to secure 
variety or to satisfy a whim. They are not to be quickly dis- 
carded when fashions change. The layout of the bathroom, 
the selection of plumbing fixtures and especially of mech- 
anical trimmings such as valves and faucets, which above all 
else should have easily renewable wearing parts — these mat- 
ters are worthy of the utmost consideration. 



Pointers for Heating Equipment 

^T^HERE are a number of arguments which the heating en- 
gineer can advance in connection with a campaign to en- 
courage hot water and steam heating. One Toronto plumber 
who has taken part in this campaign with good results, uses 
his show windows a great deal to further the idea. It has 
been found that there are a great many heating installations 
where the use of radiators would be much more satisfactory 
than other systems. In addition to the use of such window 
displays the heating engineer can make good use of his ad- 
vertising space to develop the idea. 



One ad recently appearing on this subject under the head- 
ing "Heat by Radiators" stated "Faulty heating by old fash- 
ioned furnaces and stoves accounts for many a 'cold' and 
many more serious winter ailments. If one room is too hot 
— another too cold, you suffer 'indoor exposure' — surest 
source of sickness in the cold weather. Why take the chances, 
risk the discomfort, lack the convenience of heat by radia- 
tors? There's health in the home warmed by radiators; no 
risk of 'indoor exposure' and no dirt, soot, dust or gaseous 
fumes are carried into the rooms. All rooms are cheerfully, 
genially warmed when you heat by radiators, properly in- 
stalled. Let us tell you more about it; economical in use, 
lasting a lifetime." 

Another plumber's ad on this topic stated "Most warmth 
for the least money fpr the rest of your .life. Modern radia- 
tor heating soon pays for itself in fuel saved, and gives life- 
time service, keeps uniform, easily regulated warmth through- 
out the house. It adds far more than the cost to the value 
of the property. Our heating systems are economical and 
inexpensive. Let's talk over your heating problems now." 

These are just some suggestions for suitable ad. copy. 

Dangers of Gas Poisoning 

TT IS again shown by the death of ten Toronto men m the 
gas works recently that carbon monoxide, one of the prin- 
cipal constituents, is highly poisonous, and is the more dan- 
gerous because it is invisible and without smell. A room 
might be full of it, yet a person entering would be quite un- 
aware that he had entered a lethal chamber, it is pointed out 
by a correspondent in a late issue of The London Morning 
Post. "Consciousness would suddenly be lost, and the end 
would come speedily. The only sure remedy, .vere the victim 
discovered and removed from the room, wo-jid be the trans- 
fusion of blood from a healthy subject — and it would be 
practically impossible, of course, to find a person willing to 
provide a pint of his own blood (the loss of which would 
seriously endanger his own life) within a very short time 
limit. It is said as little as a half of one per cent, of carbon 
monoxide in the air breathed has caused death in cases where 
coke or charcoal has been burning in an ill-ventilated room, 
while as little as one-tenth of one per cent, has had most in- 
jurious effects." 

This gas, as numerous fatal cases show, is a chief ingred- 
ient of the fumes of burning charcoal. It is given off by iron 
stoves at a red heat, and even by hot-water pipes. Tramps 
who sleep in warm brick kilns have often been poisoned by 
it. It is responsible for the deaths caused in places where 
water-gas is used for industrial purposes, e.g., in steel 
smelting. 



Editorials in Brief 

THOSE WHO accomplish most are the ones who begin at 
home and work outward in an ever-widening circle. Let us 
remember this: "The light that shines farthest, shines bright- 
est at home." That is to say we will prove ourselves worthy 
of seasonal joys' if we aim definitely to make our own busi- 
ness organization finer, stronger, and of loftier ideals. 

THE PROGRESS of the world depends upon the men who 
walk in the fresh furrows and through the rustling corn; 
upon those who sow and reap; upon those whose faces are 
radiant with the glare of furnace fires; upon the delvers in 
mines, and the workers in shops; upon those who give to the 
winter air the ringing music of the axe; upon those who 
battle with the boisterous billows of the sea; upon the in- 
ventors and discoverers; upon the brave thinkers. — Robert 
Ingersoll. 



February 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, Pi. UMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



25 



EDITOR 'S ANN O UN CEMENT 

FRANK STOCKDALE TO WRITE FOR 

EVERY ISSUE OF 
SANITARY ENGINEER 

"Minute Messages" for the Busy Sanitary Engineer 



IN THE March 1 issue of Sanitary Engineer 
we" will offer the first of a series of 
"MINUTE MESSAGES" by Frank Stock- 
dale, nationally known authority on business 
store problems. 

A great many of the readers of Sanitary En- 
gineer are acquainted with Mr. Stockdale and 
his work and will welcome the announcement 
that we have secured his service in furnishing 
a series of inspiring and instructive articles for 
exclusive publication in Sanitary Engineer. 
The series will be continued throughout the 
year. 

Mr. Stockdale's "MINUTE MESSAGES" will 
be presented in a most graphic way by use of 
cartoons. Each cartoon, made 
by one of America's greatest 
cartoonists, will be accompan- 
ied by a brief "snappy" right- 
to-the-point article by Mr. 
Stockdale, emphasizing and 
supplementing the message 
portrayed by the picture itself. 
Pictures are Universal Lan- 
guage — everybody reads and 
enjoys them. 

Pictures relieve mental effort 
— they rest the tired mind. 

Pictures are Forceful — they hit 
hard, sink deep, and the ideas 
stay put. 

Pictures save time — the busy 
man demands them, all others 
like them. 

You busy plumbers will revel 
in the simplicity and force of 
the "MINUTE MESSAGES" as 
they will embody worth-while, 




business-building ideas — delivered with a clean, 
constructive, lasting punch — ideas which will 
be of great value in solving your everyday busi- 
ness problems. 

Mr. Stockdale's work during the past twenty 
years in organizing Merchants' Institutes, at 
business conventions and in rendering actual 
personal service to Merchants in their stores 
has been a great value to the merchant in lifting 
him out of the drudgery of old time methods of 
doing business and adding to his power to do 
more for himself and his customers. 

Mr. Stockdale's "MINUTE MESSAGES" will 
tell you at a glance the big, vital, profitable 
things you ought to know. "THEY HIT THE 
NAIL ON THE HEAD," 
"THEY DRIVE THE POINT 
HOME" and "THEY MAKE 
IT STICK." 

Every day new problems arise 
as result of some development 
in merchandising, and as com- 
petition of other trades, and 
keen competition among 
plumbers themselves increases, 
the need for such terse and 
timely messages is very ap- 
parent. 

These "MINUTE MESSAGES" 
are written for you, the busy 
plumber. You will profit 
greatly by following them 
closely in each issue of 
SANITARY ENGINEER. 

Watch for the first "MINUTE 
MESSAGES" in our March 1 
issue. 



THE EDITOR. 



FRANK STOCKDALE 



WATCH FOR THE FIRST ARTICLE IN MARCH 1st ISSUE 

THEN— read his articles in every issue of SANITARY ENGINEER 
throughout the year. 



26 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February 15, 192:; 



News Notes From Coast to Coast 



BUSINESS CHANGES 

Montreal.— Pilon & B'eauchamp, plumb- 
ers, have dissolved. 

Kitchener, Ont. — L. Durst has with- 
drawn from the plumbing firm of Holl- 
inger and Durst and will be in business 
for himself. 



PERSONAL 

H. N. McAlpine, Manager of the 
Water System Department of Empire 
Brass Mfg. Co., Ltd., representatives in 
Eastern Canada of the Duro Pump & 
Mfg. Co., Dayton, Ohio, was accorded 
standing of 180.1 per cent, and entitled 
to the title of Ambassador McAlpine of 
Canada., in an unique election contest 
held as a stimulant to the sales forces of 
the company. 



FOUR FURNACE MANUFACTURERS 
MAY AMALGAMATE 

Sanitary Engineer understands that 
plans are in progress for the amalg-ama- 
tion of four Ontario manufacturers of 
furnaces. Some firms approached for a 
statement have declined to commit them- 
selves, but an announcement may be 
forthcoming shortly. 



TO DUPLICATE WATER SYSTEM 

Toronto. — The matter of expropriat- 
ing some 17 acres of land at Victoria 
Park in the east end as a site for the 
Water Works duplication system, which 
will involve the spending of millions of 
dollars, went through council without 
as much as a question being asked, as 
did the by-law giving effect to the Board 
of Control recommendation. 



NEW HEATING PLANT PROPOSALS 
ARE LAID BEFORE CITY 
COUNCIL 

Vancouver. — Despite- the electorate's 
refusal to pass the Central Heating 
Frai chise By-law at the recent muni- 
cipal elections, another concern is con- 
templating asking for a civic franchise, 
which, under the charter must also be 
* submitted to the peoplo. 

First intimation of the new enterprise 
was received through A. D. Crerr, for- 
mer engineer of the Joint Sewerage 
Board. In a letter to the City Council he 
stated that application would be made 
for a lease to Granville street property 
located between the Robertson & Hack- 
ctt mill site and C. P. R. holdings. 



Doings in the Plumbing and 
Heating Industry 



The lease would be required, said the 
letter, as a company was being incorpor- 
ated to construct and operate central 
heatinsr plants in Vancouver, for which 
application for franchise would be made 
in due time. 



WILL EXPEND $1,000,000 ON 
AQUEDUCT 

Montreal. — The city council, upon the 
recommendation of the executive com- 
mittee, has passed the by-law authoriz- 
ing the expenditure of another $1,000,- 
000 for the improvement to the city 
aqueduct system. The by-law states 
that the aforesaid amount is required 
to further enlarge and develop the 
aqueduct and for the construction of 
reservoirs and filtering basins. 



MONTREAL SANITARY BRANCH 
HAD ACTIVE YEAR 

Montreal. — Dr. S. Boucher, Director of 
Public Health, has issued his report for 
1922 covering the work of the Sanitary 
Department, under J. E. Durocher, sup- 
erintendent, and Aime Cousineau, sani- 
tary engineer. 

Inspectors made 38,129 visits to dwel- 
lings, 400 school inspections, and 5,152 
calls at clivers establishments. New 
buildings inspected numbered 3,465, 
plumbing systems, 2,864, and 1,815 al- 
terations. 

Complaints made by the department 
total 9,325, of which 6,961 were found 
warranted upon investigation. Warnings 
sent out numbered 5,909, and of 104 ac- 
tions taken, judgments were realized in 
98 cases. In 6 actions the court suspend- 
ed sentence. 

The laboratory department made 16,- 
757 analyses, of a chemical or bacterio- 
logical nature. Of these, drinking water, 
water from public baths and illuminat- 
ing gas numbered 218. 



PLUMBERS SEEK 40 P. C. BOOST IN 
SCALE OF WAGES 

Winnipeg, Man. — An increase of 40 
per cent, over the scale paid last year is 
demanded by union plumbers of Winni- 
peg, who went into conference with a 
committee of employing plumbers to ne- 
gotiate a wage scale for the 1923 build- 
ing season. 

It was learned from officers of the 
union that at the preliminary confer- 
ence, agreement was reached in regard 
to all of their demands with the excep- 
tion of the wage scale. 

A 44-hour week, the same as last year, 



was agreed to, also the master plumbers 
consented to a continuation of last 
year's agreement with regard to legal 
holidays and overtime. The increase de- 
manded by the plumbers union, if grant- 
ed, would bring their scale up from 90 
cents to 1.26 an hour. 

The chief argument advanced by the 
union men for a 40 per cent, increase 
was that it will have to be paid if the 
steady exodus of men of their craft 
from Winnipeg to the large building 
centres of the United States is to be 
stemmed. Pointing out that many of 
their union have already gone south and 
more are co. templating moving, the 
union representatives stated that the 
only hope for bringing any of them back, 
or even preventing a further exodus, is 
in the increased demand. 



ENGINEERS DECLARE SYSTEM AT 
WEST LONDON MOST EFFIC- 
IENT OF ITS KIND 

London, Ont. — London's new sewage 
pumping station, according to the Lon- 
don Engineering Society, is so efficient 
that it can be said to be much in advance 
of any other system of its kind. 

The society carried out an inspection 
in every way and pronounced it satis- 
factory. 

The new sewage pumping station was 
installed last year in West London, to 
deal with what was at that time one 
of the great problems confronting the 
city. 

The greatest difficulty that lay before 
the engineers was the fact that West 
London, was so very low that no sew r age 
could flow of its own accord to the sep- 
tic tanks down by the river and it was 
necessary to pump the fluid up to a level 
whence it could run down to the tanks. 

Plans were accordingly drawn up by 
Hector S. Phillips, the late assistant en- 
gineer of the city, and the work of con- 
struction, begun in September, 1921, was 
carried out under the supervision of W. 
M. Veitch, the present sewer engineer 
for London, to a successful conclusion in 
June of last year, when the new station 
was finally completed. 



WORK ON KITCHENER BY-LAW 

Kitchener, Ont. — It is expected that 
the committee which is revising the 
plumbing by-law will meet in the near 
future. All possible information on by- 
laws in other cities is being secured by 
the chairman. Aid. E. Ratz, and the 
city engineer who is a member of the 
committee is also formulating piopo- 
sals. 



February 15, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



27 



WATER CONSUMPTION 
HAMILTON IS HIGH 



IN 



Oil Burners Much Used In London 



Hamilton, Ont. — Under direction of 
City Engineer Gray, men have commenc- 
ed sinking- a shaft on the lake side to the 
36-inch wooden intake. This intake has 
been in disuse for a number of years by 
order of the health department, as it was 
in very shallow water and too close to 
the shore, and was completely choked 
with sand. This conduit is only about 
200 feet in length and in 8 feet of water. 
The plan of the engineer is to drill a hole 
in the top of the pipe and dig a shallow 
ditch so that the water could flow into 
it from the lake. The men of the depart- 
ment are still working on this plan, 
which will be lesorted to in case of 
emergency. 

The water consumption in Hamilton 
per capita is 130 gallons a day, the en- 
gineer stated, and on the mountain 208 
gallons per capita per day. Even if the 
mountain hospital and the nurses' home- 
were not supplied, the rate would be ex- 
tremely high on the hilltop. 

On the other hand, in cities where the 
water is metered, the consumption per 
capita is much lower, ranging from 65 
gallons to 40 gallons per day, and as low 
as 70 to 85 gallons in cities the size of 
Hamilton with about the same number 
of industries. 



WORK IS COMPLETED ON PLUMB- 
ING BY-LAW 

Ottawa. — At a round table confer- 
ence the newly appointed plumbing by- 
law committee, at its first meeting com- 
pleted all its work and definitely com- 
piled a by-law which will be presented 
to the Board of Control. The committee 
for this task last year failed to come to 
any agreement. Many clauses in the by- 
law had been opposed by the plumbing- 
trade on the grounds that it would in- 
crease the cost of the work. After con- 
sidering a number of amendments, pro- 
posed by City Plumbing Inspector S. 
Daughtry, the committee came to an 
agreement and unanimously adopted the 
amendments. Under these new changes, 
plumbing will remain at the same piice 
The by-law will make compulsory a num- 
ber of alterations, now commonly in 
force. After being dealt with by the 
Board of Control, the amended by-law. 
Number 2262. was submitted to City 
Council on February 5 and will be put 
in force March 1. 

Under the amendments adopted by the 
commission, the principal changes to be 
made are as follows: 

A minimum charge for permits to be 
made by the plumbing inspectors for 
plumbing installation and alterations; 
separate drains for all buildings other 
than tenement houses which have to 
have six-inch drain pipes; a minimum of 
four inches diameter for sewer drainage 
pipes; deep seal traps in the basement of 
all buildings; no sheet metal piping to 
be used: plumbers to be responsible for 
all work performed and not the owners 
of the building. 



London, Ont. — Indications point to an 
unusually early opening of building ac- 
tivities in the spring. Architects are 
already busy on many projects. That 
an unusually large number of homes will 
be erected is certain from plans already 
on the boards. Many of the homes will 
run from $10,000 to $25,000. A number 
of more moderate priced homes running 
from $4,000 to $7,000 will be built also. 
Plumbers are looking forward to a splen- 
did volume of business in all lines of 
materials and home requirements. 

An interesting phase of the situation 
is the keen interest being shown in oil 
burning equipment for heating. Home 
owners who have been getting along on 
scanty supplies of fuel and who have 
been uncertain as to whether they were 
even going to get that, are planning if 
possible to get away from the coal short- 
age in future. Many inquiries are be- 
ing received by architects for oil burn- 
ing equipment and several architects in 
discussing the question predicted that 
there will be a big and profitable field 
open for anyone who can supply people 
with dependable oil burning heating ap- 
paratus. 

In connection with this it might be of 
interest to note that in the new $75,000 
monastery for which plans are being 
prepared for the Redemptorist Fathers 
here, the heating will be hot water and 
oil burners. 

Present indications point to new 
records being made in building this year 
as in addition to the many new homes 
there are several large projects under 
way. Between $1,500,000 and $2,000,- 
000 will be expended in new buildings 
for the Western University. A new- 
seminary to cost $600,000 is planned by 
Bishop Fallon. A new $200,000 plant 
to replace the buildings recently destroy- 



ed by fire is contemplated by Reid Bros., 
manufacturing stationers, and a new fac- 
tory for the Orange Crush Bottlers will 
be erected shortly. In addition to these 
the Board of Education has a school 
building program that will involve an 
expenditure of $600,000 and the council 
will start work shortly on a new $300,- 
000 city hall and a new $50,000 registry 
office. 

Conference of Hamilton Stove 
& Heater Company 

Hamilton, Ont. — The salesmen of the 
Hamilton Stove & Heater Co., Limited, 
Hamilton, Ont., met in conference at 
their headquarters in Hamilton and dis 
cussed with the general sales manager, 
Mr. S. C. Moore, their selling problems 
for the coming year. In speaking with 
Mr. Moore, he reports that there is a 
very optimistic feeling among his staff 
in reference to 1923 business. The Ham- 
ilton Stove & Heater Company has in- 
augurated a new sales policy; this was 
heartily approved by the sales force who 
returned to the various fields more en- 
thusiastic than ever. They believe that 
a big volume of business will be done in 
the stove and furnace trade this year, not 
only by themselves, but by other stove 
manufacturers. 



Business Men's Association Adopt 
Novel Ad. Slogan 

"No further need to hesitate. Just 
what you need is at your gate." 

This is the message which the mem- 
bers of the Yonge and Bloor Business 
Men's Association, Toronto, are adver- 
tising throughout their own district. 
Chairman Wm. Cowan believes that by 
the use of judicious advertising this 
locality might in time become the "Fifth 
Avenue" of Toronto. 




"Jimmy" Yates on the right, sanitary engineer of Brandon, with his jriend. 
R. N. IVilloughby, on their return from a day's shooting in the Brandon hills. 
They got seventy rabbits in four hours. Can you beat that? 



28 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February 15, 1923 



Heating Engineer Gives a Demonstration 

Townsend Plumbing and Heating Co., Winnipeg, 
Man., Arouse Interest in Warm Air Furnaces by 
Demonstrating Quick Lighting Facilities 



WINNIPEG, Man. — A furnace 
completely lighted, heated, and 
banked with sufficient soft coal 
for ten hours, with drafts closed, and all 
in the space of eleven minutes was the 
result announced after a tiial demonstra- 
tion by the Townsend Plumbing and 
Heating company. The object of the 
demonstration was to show how an or- 
dinary hot air furnace might, at small 
cost and little inconvenience, be turned 
into an efficient consumer of soft coal 
with none of the usual concomitant 
dangers from gas explosion or the ne- 
cessity of frequent banking. 

The experiment was carried out un- 
der the direction of G. R. Pratt, fuel 
engineer, who had been working on the 
subject for four years. The furnace 
was cold at the start. The demonstra- 
tion commenced with the installation 
into -the furnace of a specially construct- 
ed hollow L-shaped arch through which 
air had access to the fire box. This was 
inserted in such a way to divide the coal 
chambers in two, while lying at no point 
nearer than eight inches to the grate. 
The longer arm of the device was per- 
forated. A kindling fire was then start- 
ed in the furnace, and on this was placed 
nut and {iea ; soft coal. One side of the 
coal chamber was filled with coal level 



SHOWS VALUE OF CENTRE 
HEATING 

Winnipeg. — In popular language, in- 
telligible to everyone, J. W. Sanger, 
ehief engineer of the hydro-electric sys- 
tem, gave a full and scientific description 
of the city's proposed steam standby and 
central heating plant to the Canadian 
Credit Men's Trust Association. 

Central heating systems, said Mr. 
Sanger, dated back to the time of James 
Watt. But they got their impetus from 
the discovery that 35 per cent, of the 
heat in coal went up the smokestack of a 
locomotive and only 10 per cent, of the 
heat energy went to turn into the crank 
shaft to perform useful work. The re- 
maining 55 per cent, went into the at- 
mosphere in the form of exhaust steam. 

In the first central heating plants it 
was exhaust steam that was utilized. 
Then the plants became so popular that 
live- steam had to be used as well. Some 
electrical light and power companies in 
the United States to-day sold their ex- 
haust steam because they figured it cost 
them nothing to produce, while other 
companies had gone into the business of 
selling live steam. 

Temperature records of large cities on 
the North American continent showed 
that there was no city more favorably 



with the furnace door. The other side 
was left free. Gas from the highly 
banked coal was drawn down under the 
arch and was burned up by the urgen- 
cy of the air imported through the per- 
forations of the arch. In this way all 
the gas caused by the combustion of the 
coal was utilized, so that not only was 
the heating power of the coal increased 
but the danger of explosion minimized. 
A second saving would be effected, it 
was explained, in the ability to burn 
smaller coal which was not only cheap- 
er in terms of money but went farther. 

Should one side of the furnace be- 
come clogged or dirty the fire might be 
transferred to the other by allowing the 
banked coal to dwindle and re-coaling 
on the other side of the arch. Either 
side of the grate might be shaken se- 
parately it was stated, but shaking was 
not necessary before re-stoking. Coal 
was normally put in on top of the sup- 
ply already there. 

Economy in coal as to both quality 
and price, lessening of the danger of 
explosion and increased facility in look- 
ing after the furnace were summarised 
as the results of the demonstration, 
which passed off to the satisfaction of 
all present. 



situated than Winnipeg for a central 
heating plant. New York had a heating 
season of 197 days and a mean January 
temperature of 30 degrees Fahr. Harris- 
burg, the capital of Pennsylvania, had a 
mean January temperature of 32 degrees 
Fahr. The corresponding figures for 
other cities were as follows: Detroit, 206 
days, 27 degrees; Chicago 212 days, 25 
degrees; St. Paul, 222 days, 12 degrees, 
while Winnipeg had a heating system 
of 253 days and a mean January tem- 
perature of one degree below zero. 



PLUMBING SCRUTINIZED AT 
TOWNSHIP INQUIRY 

Taking of evidence in the York Town- 
ship inquiry conducted by Judge Denton 
has been completed after a lapse of 
about three weeks. The interest had 
centred in the probe of the Treasurer's 
Department and into the manner in 
which the township had carried on its 
plumbing. 

H. Hughes, chief plumbing inspector 
for the township, was able to establish 
that he was a duly qualified plumber, and 
was followed by Harry Rushby, a 
plumber, who said that he was unaware 
of any general dissatisfaction among the 
plumbers regarding instructions re- 
ceived from the chief plumber. 



A $200 HOME WATER PLANT 

(Continued from page 13) 
It is important that the air and water 
should both enter the tank on or near 
the bottom and that water should be 
drawn from the tank at or near the 
bottom. It is preferable that the inlet 
and outlet connections should be on the 
opposite sides of the tank so that the 
air and water may separate and air will 
not be forced into or allowed to escape 
into the distributing pipe lines. 

Galvanized Tank Not Imperative 

The question of whether a galvanized 
tank is necessary is often brought up. 
Generally they are not necessary, unless 
water is alkaline or other unusual water 
conditions prevail. It is desirable, how- 
ever, if small tanks are used that they 
be galvanized. This is because in all- 
iron tanks a small amount of rust will 
form. If, however, the tank is large the 
water movement in the tank will not be 
fast enough to disturb this rust. If 
the tank is small the water will rise and 
fall rapidly and is likely to disturb the 
rust, discoloring the water and washing 
the rust from the sides of the tank so 
that another coating will form and grad- 
ually the walls of the tank will become 
corroded and thin. 

So many domestic pumping systems 
have been put on the market during the 
past few years that it is difficult for the 
prospective purchaser to make a choice. 

As a general rule low priced units 
will be found to have nothing but their 
cheapness to recommend them. A good 
unit costs more than a poor one but in 
100% of cases will be more satisfactory 
in operating and cost less to keep up. 

A first class pumping unit must be 
equipped with the proper kind of motor. 
If for use on alternating current this 
should be of the repulsion type and not 
of the cheaper split phase type. 

Construction of Pump 

The pump should be compactly built, 
operate at as slow a speed as possible 
and should have good long shaft bear- 
ings. In the best pumps all bolts, nuts, 
screws, which have to be removed for 
repairs are made of brass so that they 
will not rust in place. Piston rods 
should be of bronze or bronze covered 
and should be so designed that water 
cannot creep along them from the stuff- 
ing box to the cross head and thence get 
into the crank case. Water in the crank 
case displaces the oil and crank bearing 
will not get proper lubrication. 

Don't sell a unit because a salesman 
tells you it is the best made. He prob- 
ably thinks it is but he may be wrong. 
Find out all about it and about the man- 
ufacturer, what he has made and how 
his goods have stood up. How much 
does he know about pumping equip- 
ment? 

If he can satisfy you on these points 
and will co-operate with you in helping 
to sell his apparatus and keep it sold, 
you can make no mistake and will reap 
a handsome profit from the sale of do- 
mestic water systems. 



February 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 29 



Patterns for Smoke Pipe Branch 

Prepared for Sanitary Engineer by O. W. kothe, Principal, St. Louis 
Technical Institute, St. Louis, Missouri 




Development of Patterns for Smoke Pipe Branch. 



RESPONDING to an inquiry for a 
smoke pipe branch as per sketch, 
and which is reproduced in the 
drawing, will say that this is an imprac- 
tical fitting to lay out. You cannot mitre 
a larger pipe over a smaller pipe as 
measurements sem to indicate, although 
put them in your sketch from your let- 
ter. I may have the wrong viewpoint 
on your idea; but that is the interpreta- 
tion you left. To lay this fitting out ac- 
curately, a person would have to use 
triangulation. 

About the best way to treat the fit- 
ting is to lay out each pattern as if they 
were tees of similar diameters, and then 
squeeze the sides together so as to take 
out the opening X in the plan view. This 
will elongate the tees and only an ap- 
proximate fit is assured. Possibly some 
one else might work this different, in 
fact possibly a dozen mechanics may 
each go at it different in order to 
achieve their aim. But you see, since 
tees must be elongated, no true mitre 
line can be established; and, therefore, 
there is liable to be more or less trim- 
ming before a suitable fit is secured. 

But anyway you first draw the center 
line of "A" and then the center line of 
"B" and then of -d-. After this measure 
your diameters, and describe semi-circles 
"A" and "B" and treat in equal spaces, 
and extend them to the mitre lines 1-b, 
also -c-d-e as shown. This gives your 
intersections with which to develop the 
patterns. For the larger tee: pick the 
girth from half circle "A" and set off 
on a line as 1-4 and then develop the 
lines from the mitre 1-b as points 
l'-2' -3' -4' in pattern. This pattern is 
then reversed over four times and you 
have the whole pattern. Some trim- 
ming will be necessary in order to ac- 
count for the elongation it will have to 
undergo. 

The pattern for the pipe "B" is de- 
veloped by picking the girth from semi- 
circle "B" and setting it off as 1-7 in 
pattern. Draw stretchout lines, and 
then drop lines from mitre line -c-d-e- 
which establishes points 7' -6' -5' -4' etc. 
to 1'. Sketch a line through these points 
and you have your pattern as shown. The 
necessary lengths between pipes must be 
added and you can cut out the pattern, 
double it over, and you have the full 
pattern. 

The openings had best be marked out 
after the tees are made up and shaped 
to make a snug fit — then mark out the 
opening in your pipes and make your 
connection. Laps must be allowed extra 
on all patterns because the development 
is net, and edges must be allowed ex- 
tra or the girth will be short. 



WE LAUNCH A PRODIGIOUS 
PUBLICITY CAMPAIGN 

(Continued from page 15) 
tearze to my voyce. 

"No and I ain't interested in plumb- 
ers neether," he sez with the cruelty of 
a inquizitioner. 

"Well I'm goin to leeve these kutz with 
you," I sez, puttin them on the gait 
poste and layin 2 smoak-testin segars 
on top of them. 

"I'll be around again nxt. wk.," was my 
partening shot. "Good-nite," and with 
that I turned on my heal and remount- 
ed the lizzie. 

"Yeh neadn't bother," he hollored out 
as I turned the lizzie tords town. But 
as I looked over my sholder I seen him 
pick up the segars 1st and put them in 
his vesst pokt and then took up the 
kutz. 

Next a. m. when I breazed into the 
shop Bill and Vilet was their with a 
look of xpectancy on there fase. 

"Well," sez Bill, "got the contrak in 
yr. pokt.?" 

"Roam warnt bilt in 1 day," I re- 
sponds. "Jest give me a little time. 
A feller dont usulie ann. his ingaigement 
the 1st time he culls on a girl does he?" 

I looked tword Vilet but she had her 
head reverted and if she herd what I 
sed she didnt turn a hare witch was jest 
as well as it sounded kinda follish. 

"Did you see Sigh?" ast Bill. 

"Oh I scene him all 0. K. but he scene 
me 1st." 

"Did he order you off the premices?" 



"No; I went on. Seein as he didnt in- 
vyte me in but hung onto the gait as 
if he was skeered I was going to swipe 
it, our conversatn. was moar less formeL 
However I sed Ide call agen and left a 
cupple of segars." 

"If them segars is like what you give 
me last weak heel have the ax reddy 
for you the nxt. time," sez Bill with a 
laff. 

"You leave that 2 me," I retortured 
with confydence. "Ime goin to land that 
old hick or braik a legg." 

Vilet give me a smile that maid me 
feal like I cood a konkered the world.. 



ENGINEERS OF WATER WORKS 
MEET IN TORONTO 

The mid- Winter meeting of the Can- 
adian section of the American Water- 
works Association is being held in Tor- 
onto, and the men responsible for the 
design, construction and operation of 
waterworks plants all over Canada are 
in attendance. There is an exhib- 
ition of waterworks equipment and 
supplies, and over 25 representative 
firm reserved space. 

The officers under whose auspices the 
meeting is being held are as follows: — 
Chairman, R. L. Dobbin, Peterboro; 
vice-chairman, F. A. Dallyn, Toronto; 
trustees, H. R. Starr, Orillia; N. R. Wil- 
son, Brantford; Jas. J. Salmond, Toron- 
to; secretary-treasurer, C. D. Brown, 
Walkerville, Ont. 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February 15, 192:; 



Market Conditions and Tendencies 





Price Trend on Sanitary and 
Heating Supplies 








Markets at a Glance 



T N THIS issue there is shown an extensive list of 
price changes in many lines of plumbing and 
heating supplies. These changes are all to- 
ward higher levels and reflect the strength of 
primary markets and the general feeling of 
optimism throughout business circles. Prominent 
among the changes noted in the general advance 
are those on galvanized products, which have risen 
from 25c to 50c per hundred square feet, tinware, 
graniteware, embossed and japanned ware which 
have advanced from 2 to 5 per cent., iron pipe and 
nipples, on which new higher lists have been an- 
nounced, putty quotations are 50c per hundred lbs. 
above old levels, solder with a raise in price of lc 
per pound and slightly higher quotations on ingot 
metals. From primary sources the indications, in 
some other lines, are for still more price adjust- 
ments toward higher levels, the opinion being that 



with increased demand, production will be taxed 
and deliveries slow. In the case of the steel and 
iron sheet market it is pointed out that very few 
U.S. producers have any galvanized sheets to sell 
for first quarter delivery and they are quoting 
premiums of not less than $5.00 a ton over U.S. 
steel corporation price, for any sale now made and 
as far as the steel corporation is concerned they 
have absolutely nothing to offer, although they 
have not advanced their price. 

It is also noted that in local circles, industrial 
plants are becoming daily more active and capacity 
operation is fast becoming the rule, in some cases 
for the first time in three years. Since the French 
occupation of the Ruhr, few shipments have been 
reported from European sources, this accounts in 
some measure for the industrial activity in Amer- 
ican centres. 



Montreal Markets 



MONTREAL, February 13. — Price developments continue to at- 
tract attention in the markets for plumbing and steam-fitting 
supplies. Revisions now recorded are all in an upward di- 
rection with the exception of closet combinations, nominal quotations 
on which are a little lower. A new higher list on wrought piping 
is one of the chief changes upwards, both black and galvanized pipe 
being shown at increased quotations. Revised discounts on wrought 
nipples bring advanced prices, while bar and wire solders are slightly 
higher. Radiators, boiler tubes, and in tools, stocks and dies, are 
also increased in price. Various lines of tin shop supplies are affect- 
ed in the general, revision upwards announced by ware manufactur- 
ers, and the new season's prices on tin sap buckets and spouts are 
higher than last year. Strength remains in primary steel markets, 
and this is reflected on various iron and steel products, including 
sheets, bar products, soil pipe and fittings, corrugated sheets, range 
boilers, etc. Revisions in certain of these lines would not be sur- 
prising at an early date. Ingot metal markets are also displaying 
a firm tone. 



NEW SEASONS PRICES ON SAP 
BUCKETS AND SPOUTS 

Montreal. 

Quotations for the coming' season are 
now issued on sap buckets, syrup cans 
and spouts. Tin buckets and spouts are 
about ten per cent, higher than last 
year, while galvanized buckets are 
slightly lower. Syrup can prices are un- 
changed. Following are new quotations: 

SAP BUCKETS— 



$14.95 ; No. 8, 
19.50; No. 16, 



Straight pattern - Per 100 No. 

$16.25; No. 9, $18.20; No. 12. 
$23.40. 

Western pattern 6 pt. $14.63; 10 <it. $19.50. 
Extra heavy— No. 12. $24.05: No. 16, $29.25. 
Frbntenac — 10 qt. $-20. 59. 

Galvanized straight — No. 9. $20.70; No. 12. 
$24.30; No. 16, $27.90. 

Galvanized Western— 10 qt. $24.30. 

Square syrup cans, one gallon, $16.75 per hun- 
dred. 

Spouts — Perfection, $20 00 : Eureka. S17.00; 
Sterling $24.65 in lots of 1000. 



TINSHOP SUPPLIES AFFECTED BY 
NEW WARE PRICES 

Montreal. 

Manufacturers of enamelled ware, 
galvanized and tin ware announce new 
higher prices on practically all products, 
and certain lines of tin shop require- 
ments are included. Following are also 
new quotations on certain wares which 
will be of interest to many merchants: 

Pieced tin ware, plus 40 p.c. ; Stove boards 
(wood lined) 10-5 per cent. Stove boards (paper 
lined), 30 per cent. Fire shovels, plus 15 per 
cent. Steel sinks, plus 20 per cent. Stove pipe 
elbows. Net list. Stove pipe. Net list ; Light 
black elbows, 6" $1.60 doz. net ; Light black 
elbows, 7 inch, $1.85 doz. net. Chimney thimlbles, 
plus 10 per cent. Tinners' trimmings, plain, 50 
per cent. Tinners' trimmings, retinned. 10-5 
per cent. Milk can trimmings, plus 10 per cent 
Copper bottoms Net list. Trimmings, general 
plus 10 per cent. Creamery can taps, prices on 
application. 



SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS ON FIRM 
MARKET TREND 

Montreal. 

Current quotations on soil pipe and 
fittings remain at unchanged discounts 
with the undertone of the market again 
described as firm, owing to higher costs 
of fuel and raw materials. Although 
new higher prices on radiation, an allied 
product, are issued, there is said to be no 
indication of any immediate changes in 
either pipe or fittings. Prices, however, 
are considered firm as follows: 
SOIL pipe — 

2 and 3 inch 35% 

4 inch 35% 

5 and 6 inch , 35% 

8 inch net 

FITTINGS — 

2 to fi inch 45% 

8 inch net 



CORRUGATED SHEETS REMAIN ON 
FIRM PRICE BASIS 

Montreal. 

In some quarters higher quotations on 
corrugated sheets are thought likely at 
any time. Other dealers describe the 
market as very firm, but with no definite 
indication of a change in an upward 
direction at present. There is undoubt- 
edly a firm undertone in these products 
due to the strong tendency in flat gal- 
vanized sheet markets. Prevailing list 
prices and discount are as follows: 

CORRUGATED SHEETS— Per 100 Sq. t\. 

No. 28 gauge 6 50 

No. 26 gauge ; 7 00 

No. 26. U. S. gauge 8 00 

No. 24 gauge p 00 

No. 22 gauge 11 00 

No. 20 gauge 12 50 

No. 18 gauge 16 50 

Less 10 per cent. 

Lighter than 24 gauge and wider than 27 

inches, $0.75 per square extra. 



February 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



31 



REVISED QUOTATIONS ON CLOSET 
COMBINATIONS 

Montreal. 

The easier tendency recently noted in 
the market for closet outfits has resulted 
in slightly lower prices on combinations 
and bowls. Outfits are reduced approxi- 
mately one dollar each, while a recession 
of varying extent is recorded on bowls. 
Seats and tanks are unchanged, although 
present levels on these are more or less 



nominal, certain jobbers quoting a little 
lower than others. Following are re- 
vised quotations: 

closet combinations- 
low Down Outfits, each 

Closet, standard outfit, oak 24 00 

Do., post hinge seat 25 00 

Do., oak vitro or Pussyfoot 24 00 

Do., post hinge seat 25 

Do., mahogany vitro or Pussyfoot, post 

hinge seat and cover 27 45 

Do., vitreous china, oak post hinge seat 

and cover 27 45 

Do., vitreous china. mahogany post 

hinge seat and cover 27 70 

Do., white vitro or Pussyfoot, oak post 

hinge seat and cover 27 50 

Do., white vitro or Pussyfoot, mahogany 

post hinge seat and coveor 27 70 

Do., enamelled 'iron tan!:, , ak post 

hinge seat and cover 28 45 

Do., enamelled iron tank, mahogany 

post hinge seat and cover 28 70 

Add for %" valve on supply pipe i 25 

Add for spud 60 

Add for reverse trap bowl 1 .j0 

Add for syphon jet bowl 7 00 

Deduct for supply pipe 80 

Deduct for floor hinge 60 

CLOSET BOWLS 

Riche' ; eu bowl J 00 

Washdown bowl with spud 9 90 

Reverse trap bowl with spud 9 90 

Syphon jet bowl with spud 15 40 

CLOSET SEATS 

Oak post hinge seat and cover 3 85 

Oak wood strip seat and cover 3 50 

Mahogany finish post hinge seat and cover 4 05 

closet tanks- 
Low down, oak vitro or Pussyfoot with 

fittings less seat 13 20 

White vitro or Pussyfoot with fittings. 

flush elbow and supply 15 65 

Vitreous china tank with fittings, flush 

elbow and supply 18 0(1 

E'namelled iron with fittings, flush elbow 

and supply 18 00 



SLIGHTLY IMPROVED SALE OF 
ENAMELLED WARE 

Montreal. 

With the winter weeks passing, a 
slight improvement is noted in the move- 
ment of enamelled ware products, and 
dealers anticipate a continued better- 
ment as the season advances. No change 
is made in quotations, with rumors of 
unsettlement in some quarters. Follow- 
ing are list prices and discount: 
ENAMELED WARE — 
Sinks, roll rim — 

18 x 30 $23 00 

Sinks, flat rim — 1 only 2 only 3 only 

16 x 24 $ 7 50 $ 7 40 $ 7 30 

18 x 30 8 70 8 60 8 50 

20 x 30 9 90 9 80 9 70 

Bath tubs, roll rim, 4. 4%, 6 feet, 24 to 

30 in. wide 51 40 

Bath tubs, 6V6 feet. 57 10 

Lavatories — 

17x19 in. Apron F139 or P4046 15 30 

18x24 in. Apron F154 or P3845 or P3847 23 60 

18x21 in. Apron F169 or P4205 17 60 

17x19 in. Roll rim. F241 or P4345 12 60 

Less 33 1-3 per cent. 



NEW HIGHER LIST ON WROUGHT 
PIPING 

Montreal. 

As pointed out in recent issues of 
Sanitary Engineer, the undertone of the 
wrought pipe market has been very firm. 
A new list is now issued, superseding 
No. 57, showing higher prices on both 



black and galvanized pipe. The new list. 
No. 58, is as follows, recording an ad- 
vance of $6 a ton on black pipe and SI 
per ton on galvanized: 

WROUGHT PIPE 



Price 


List No. 58. 


February 


1922. 






Standard Buttweld 


Pipe S 


IC 








Blk. 


Ga 


v. ink 


Gal v. 


Sizi 




Steel 


Gen. 


W rot . 


Iron 


% 


in. 


6.00 


8.00 




• ••• 


Y l 


in. 


4.14 


6.12 


7.38 


9.42 


*/5i 




4.14 


6.12 


7.38 


9.42 


V-> 


in. 


5.27 


6.72 


7.57 


9.10 


% 


in. 


6.44 


8.05 


9.20 


10.93 


1 


in. 


9.18 


11.58 


13.26 


15.81 


i V4 


in. 


12.42 


15.64 


17.94 


21.39 


IVi 


in. 


14.85 


18.70 


21.45 


25.58 


2 


in. 


19.88 


25.16 


28.86 


34.41 


2 Vi; 


in. 


31.59 


39.78 






3 


in. 


41.31 


52.02 






3 


in 


53 36 


66.24 






4 






78.48 










Standard Lapweld 


Pipe S 


c 








Per 100 feet. 










Blk. 


Gal 


v. Bik. 


Lull \ . 






Steel 


Gen. 


Wrot. 


Iron 


2 


in. 


.r. .. 23.31 


28.49 


32.19 


37.74 


2M> 


in. 


34.52 


42.71 


48.56 


57.33 


3 




45.14 


55.85 


63.50 


74.97 


3 V. 


in. 


54.28 


67.16 


76.36 


90.16 


4 


in. 


64.31 


79.57 


90.47 


106.82 




i. 


74.93 


92.71 


1.10 


1.30 


•5 




87.32 


108.04 


1.29 


1.51 


6 


in. 


1.18 


1.40 


1.67 


1.96 




in. 


... 1.48 


1.83 


2.14 


2.55 


8L, 


in. 


1.55 


1.93 


2.25 


2.68 


8 


in. 


1.79 


2.22 


2.59 


3.08 


9 


in. 


2.17 


2.69 






10L 


in. 


2.02 


2.50 


2.91 


3.46 


10 


in 


2.60 


3.21 


3.75 


4.45 



REVISION NOTED IN RADIATOR 
DISCOUNTS 

Montreal. 

Through a revision in discounts quo- 
tations on radiation are increased four 
points. On the upright radiators the 
discount on hot water is now 51 per 
cent., and on steam 52 per cent., former 
discounts being 55 and 56 per cent, re- 
spectively. On wall radiators, discount is 
changed from 52 to 48 per cent. As 
pointed out in recent market reports, 
there has been a firm undertone in these 
products, with labor and fuel costs on 
the increase. No change is made in boil- 
er prices and following are prevailing 
discounts: 

RADIATOR'S AND BOILERS — 

Radiator list prices are for 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 
column radiators, per sq. ft. 

45 in. to 38 in.. $1; 32 in.. $1.10; 30 in., $1.15; 
26 in., $1.20; 23 in, $1.26; 22 in., $1.30; 20 in., 
$1.36; 18 in.. $1.40; 16 in., $1.50; 14 in., $1.55: 
13 in., $1.00. Discount 51 per cent for hot 
water, and 52 per cent for steam. 

Wall radiators— 5 ft., $1.15; 6 ft., $1.10; 7 ft.. 
$1.05; 9 ft., $1.05; 12 ft., $1.05; Discount 48 
per cent. 

Boilers — Roi.'nd hut water boilers, sizes from 
to 10, 60 per cent, off list. Square or sectional 
hot water or steam boilers, 15 in., 15 per cent. 
Square or sectional water boilers, 19 in. to 36 
in., 20 per cent. Square or sectional steam boil- 
ers. 19 in., to 36 in 17 per cent. Ontario Gov- 
erment trimmings, 15 per cent. 

Round steam boilers, standard trimmings, 28 
per cent. Ontario Government trimmings, 25 per 
cent. 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. Guelph. 



PROMISING OUTLOOK FOR ASBES- 
TOS PRODUCTS 

Montreal. 

Local dealers in asbestos products 
state that, while current trade can only 
be described as seasonal, there is a quite 
promising outlook for business at a lit- 
tle later date. By the number of in- 
quiries and requests for figurings on re- 
quirements it is felt that a resumption 
of activities will be noted toward the lat- 
ter end of this month and March. There 



is a firm undertone in the market, with 
quotations unchanged as follows: 

ASBESTOS PRODUCTS — 

Off list prices 



2 ply pipe covering 57 '/2% 

3 ply pipe covering , 55% 

4 ply pipe covering 50% 

85% magnesia 40% 

Per bag 

Boiler covering 

Per 100 lb*. 

Asbestos sheathing 7 75 8 25 



NO CHANGE IN VALVE AND BIBB 
DISCOUNTS 

Montreal. 

No change is made in quotations on 
compression goods, notwithstanding 
higher prices recently appeared on other 
outside markets. There is a firm under- 
tone in the market, but it is thought 
that no change will appear during the 
ensuing weeks at least. Following are 
present discounts: 



VALVES AND BIBBS 

Compression work, standard 45% 

Fuller work, standard 30% 

Quick opening compression bibbs 13% 

Bath cocks, quick opening 41% 

Bath cocks, compression 41% 

Basin Cocks, quick opening 46% 

Flatway stop and waste cocks, standard 56% 
Roundway stop and waste cocks, standard 56% 

Brass steam cocks, standard, V\ in 50% 

Radiator valves, standard 55/25% 

Do., removable discs 55/25% 

Globe, angle and check valves, standard 25% 

Gate or straightway 25% 

Emeo globe valves 33% 

Emco check valves 33% 

Jenkins globe, angle, check and swing 

check 10% 

Jenkins gate or straightway 16% 

Jenkins iron body, globe and angle . . . . 15% 

Jenkins iron body, gate 25% 

N P. "O" and "S" traps 40% 



FIRM TONE STILL DISPLAYED IN 
INGOT METALS 

Montreal. 

Firmness is still shown in ingot metal 
market, although advances have not re- 
cently been as marked as in former 
weeks. The unsettled conditions in Eur- 
ope have reflected in metals generally 
and until the situation clears, develop- 
ments may be numerous in these mar- 
kets. Tin is firm, but quieter, while cop- 
per is also reported on the quiet side. 
Local quotations on both metals are 
practically unchanged. Lead remains as 
strong as ever on the New York market, 
with London also holding its own. Spel- 
ter appears to be marking time, and 
prices are again slightly easier. Anti- 
mony is very firm, with offerings from 
China practically nil. There is little if 
any change in the aluminum market, 
this metal continuing quiet. 



STRONG TONE REMAINS IN PRI- 
MARY STEEL MARKETS 

Montreal. 

Continued strength is apparent in 
basic steel market conditions. With Bri- 
tish producers overseas announcing a 
general increase in practically all lines, 
mills to the south are gradually lining 
up higher prices from week to week in 
some quarters, although the larger in- 
terests have not yet taken any action in 
this direction. It is thought, however, 
that increased levels may be generally 
announced in the near future. Locally 
no change has been made since the re- 
vision three weeks ago, but local pro- 
ducers again state that the trend is un- 



32 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February 15, 1923 



doubtedly upwards. Warehouse trade 
continues to show a slight improvement, 
and there are indications of a better 
movement in industrial circles. Un- 
changed price levels are: 
BAR iron — 

Common bar iron, 100 lbs 3 35 

Refined iron 4 85 

Irish finish machinery steel 3 40 

Mild steel . . 3 35 

Single reeled machinery steel 5 25 

Band steel 3 85 

Spring steel 7 00 8 50 

Sleighshoe steel 3 35 

Tire steel 3 55 

Harrow tooth steel 3 50 

Toe caulk steel 4 25 

Mining tool steel, per lb 19 

Black Diamond tool and cast steel per lb. 19 
NOTE — Refined iron is approximately tl.60 per 
100 lbs. over base, but fluctuates owing to un- 
•ettled market. 
Band steel in scroll bundles, 60c por 100 lbs. 
•xtra. 



REVISED DISCOUNTS ON 
WROUGHT NIPPLES 
Montreal. 

Following a general revision in other 
cast iron and malleable fittings two 
weeks ago is a price increase on wrought 
iron nipples. The change in discounts is 
five per cent, on all sizes, and following 
are revised quotations: 
PIPE FITTINGS — 

Cast iron fittings , 22% 

Plugs, cast iron 22% 

Do., solid 22% 

Do., countersunk 22% 

Bushings, cast 25% 

Do., malleable 25% 

Unions 40% 

Flanged unions 22% 

Flanged fittings 27%% 

Dart unions, black, % to 2 in 331-3% 

Do., % in., 2% in., and larger 23% 

Do., galv. add to black 30% 

Nipples, % to 4", close and short 50% 

Do., long 55% 

Do., 4% to 8", close and short 40% 

Do., long 45% 

Couplings. 4" and under 25% 

Do., 4%" and larger 5% 

Malleable Fittings — 

Piece list effective June 1st, 1922. Discoun* 
68 per cent. 



FIRM TREND CONTINUES ON PRI- 
MARY SHEETS 

Montreal. 

The upward tendency in sheet markets 
is still evident, quotations on Canada 
plate showing an increase of twenty-six 
cents per box. Bookings on import in 
these products have in many cases been 
taken care of, and the present increase 
is made on warehouse stocks. Tinplate 
and turn plate quotations remain at re- 
cent revisions. 

While local price levels on galvanized 
and black sheets are nominally un- 
changed, a very strong tone remains on 
primary markets. In certain quarters 
on American markets it is noted that 
the trend is decidedly upward as the 
weeks pass, and although larger inter- 
ests have not yet announced increased 
values, it is felt that such a development 
is not unlikely in the near future. This 
move has been taken by British manu- 
facturers overseas, and the situation 
there is little changed, firmness still 
existing. The opinion among local dis- 
tributors is unanimous that if the pre- 
sent season was a more active one for 
sheets, higher prices would now be rul- 
ing. It is also predicted that with an 
improvement in sales during the coming 
weeks, the required factor for higher 



prices will be given. At present, fol- 
lowing are nominal quotations: 

BLACK SHEETS— 

10 gauge, base 4 25 

12 gauge 4 35 

14 gauge 4 45 

16 gauge 4 55 

18—20 gauge 4 80 

22—24 gauge 4 85 

26 gauge 4 90 

28 gauge 5 10 

GALVANIZED SHEETS— 

Queen's Head Fleur de Lis 

28 gauge 7 25 7 00 

26 gauge 7 00 6 75 

24 gauge 6 70 6 45 

22 gauge 6 65 6 40 

18—20 gauge 6 40 6 15 

Other Brands — 

10% oz 7 00 

28 U. S. base 6 50 

26 U. S. base 6 25 

24 — 22 gauge 6 10 

20—18 gauge 5 90 

16 gauge 5 75 

Above prices are for % ton lots in English 
iron and 1000 lb. lots in American iron with an 
extra charge of 25c. for less quantities. Extra for 
sheets 3 ft. wide, 28 gauge and 10% oz., 25c. per 
100 lbs. Further extra for sheets 4 ft. wide 
according to gauge. 

CORRUGATED SHEETS— Per 100 Sq. Ft. 

No. 28 gauge 6 50 

No. 26 gauge 7 00 

No. 26. U. S. gauge 8 00 

No. 24 gauge 9 00 

No. 22 gauge 11 00 

No. 20 gauge 12 50 

No. 18 gauge 16 50 

Less 10 per cent. 

Lighter than 24 gauge and wider than 27 

inches, 75c. per square extra. 

TIN PLATE— 

20 x 28 x 100 lb. basis 14 00 

20 x 28 IC, 112s 14 50 

20 x 28 IX, 112s 16 00 

20 x 28 IXX, 56s 9 50 

20 x 28 IXXX, 56s 11 00 

TERNE PLATE— 

20 x 28 IC, 112s, 200 lb 13 25 

20 x 28 IC, 112c, 214 lb 13 75 

CANADA PLATE— 

Half bright 52s 5 20 

Half bright 60s 5 25 

Blued 52s 5 30 

Welsh, polished, 52s 6 70 

Welsh, polished, 60s 6 95 

Galvanized 52s 7 50 

Galvanized 60s 7 75 



RANGE BOILER PRICES FIRM BUT 
UNCHANGED 

Montreal. 

Although range boilers are not in- 
cluded in the list of galvanized goods 
shown at higher figures this week, the 
undertone of the market remains in a 
very firm position. One manufacturer 
stated that increased quotations were 
certainly warranted, but there had been 
a certain amount of unsettlement in the 
sale of these products, and any change 
upwards was deferred, for the present 
at least. In this connection, it is now 
noted that distributors who were former- 
ly quoting a slight recession in prices 
have adjusted discounts off standard 
list prices, and net quotations are on a 
more uniform basis. List and discounts 
are: 

RANGE BOILERS:— 

5 Gallon M3.50 

12 " 14.00 

18 " 15.00 

25 " 16.50 

30 " 17.60 

35 " 20.60 

40 " 22.76 

52 " 38.00 

66 " 60.76 

82 " 74.00 

100 " 103.00 

120 " 117.00 

14* " 164.00 

1«8 " 187.00 

>92 " 210.00 

Std., less 40 per cent. ; Ex. Heavy, 30 per cent. 



BAR SOLDER PRICES ADVANCED 
ONE CENT PER POUND 

Montreal. 

All grades of bar solder are advanced 
one cent per pound, and wire solder one- 
half cent, on the local market. This is 
the second revision upwards on these 
products in recent weeks. Tin on pri- 
mary markets is still in a very firm 
market position, while, as expected, 
spelter has regained its former strength. 
Lead is reported a little steadier, after 
continued advances, and the opinion is 
expressed that the peak has been 
reached on the present movement. Fol- 
lowing are prevailing quotations: 

LEAD AND ZINC PRODUCTS— 

Lead pipe, per 100 lbs., up to 2" 14 00 

Do., 2" to 8" 15 00 

Do:, 8" and over 16 00 

Lead waste, per 100 lbs 15 00 

Note — Lead pipe is subject to a discount of 10%. 

Lead traps and bends 15% 

Lead wool, lb 14% 

Lead sheets, 2% lbs., sq. ft. lb 12 

Lead sheets, 3 to 3% lbs., sq. ft. lb... 1.1% 

Do., 4 to 8 lbs., sq. ft. lb 11 

Cut sheets, %c. lb. extra and cut sheets 
to size, %c. lb. extra. 

Solder, guaranteed, lb 28 

Do., strictly, lb 25 

Do., commercial 24 

Do., wiping, lb 24 

Do., wire, lb : . . . 38% 

Zinc, sheets, casks 11 

Do., broken lots 12 



HIGHER PRICES QUOTED ON 
BOILER TUBES 

Montreal. 

Following a firm undertone in the 
market, quotations on boiler tubes now 
show a revision, sizes from 2 inch up- 
wards being advanced about 5 per cent. 
Both seamless and lapweld tubes are 
affected by the change, and local dealers 
state that with a general firming ten- 
dency in mill centres the question of de- 
liveries must still be considered. As in 
other iron and steel products, producers 
are faced with rising values in raw ma- 
terial and fuel costs. The movement of 
tubes is slightly improved, and should 
continue to show a betterment as the 
season advances. Following are revised 
prices: 

BOILER TUBES— 

Seamless Lapweld 

1 inch 20 00 

1% inch 22 00 

iy 2 inch 21 00 

1% inch 24 50 24 00 

2 inch 21 50 20 00 

2% inch 24 50 23 00 

2 inch 29 00 24 50 

3 inch 34 00 31 00 

3% inch 39 50 35 50 

4 inch 50 00 45 00 

Prices, per 100 ft., f.o.b. Montreal. 



REVISED DISCOUNTS QUOTED ON 
STOCKS AND DIES 

Montreal. 

Higher quotations are shown on Bull 
Dog stocks and dies through changing 
the discount to 12% per cent. These 
were formerly quoted at 20 per cent, off 
list prices. 



GRADUAL BUT STEADY IMPROVE- 
MENT IN SCRAP 

Montreal. 

Dealers in scrap materials describe 
the market as showing a slow but steady 
improvement. Consumption for the most 
part is still of a hand-to-mouth nature, 
but gradually growing. Yellow and red 
metals are, if anything, a little more ac- 



February 15, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



xi 



tive than other lines. There is a fairly 
firm tone in both markets, rubber scrap 
continuing stronger in sympathy with 
advances made in crude rubber circles. 



COTTON WASTES CONTINUE ON 
FIRM BASIS 

Montreal. 

There is still a firm undertone in the 
market for cotton wastes, and, according 
to one local manufacturer, if the present 
tendency continues there are chances 
of a further revision at a little later 
date. Raw cotton in primary circles is 
fluctuating with a strong tone still pre- 



NEW DISCOUNTS NOW IN EFFECT 
ON WROUGHT NIPPLES 

Toronto. 

By a lowering of discounts on wrought 
nipples an increase of 5 per cent, has 
become effective. The new discounts 
no,w in effect are given below. 
NIPPLES. WROUGHT — 

Close and short, 4 in. and under, 50 per cent., 
4V> and larger, 40 per cent; long, 4 in. and 1 under, 
55 per cent ; 4% in. and larger, 45 per cent ; 
running thread, 4 in. and under, 30 per cent. 



NO PRICE DEVELOPMENTS RE- 
CORDED IN FITTINGS 

Toronto. 

Although prices of iron pipe and nip- 
ples have undergone an upward revision, 
no new developments of a similar char- 
acter have affected fittings prices. The 
recently revised discount on malleable 
fittings from 70 to 68 per cent, is the last 



sent. Quotations remain at the revision 
of last month, as follows: 



COTTON WASTES — Per lb. 

Cream polishing 21 

White, XXX extra 18 

White. XX grand 17 

White XLCR 16 

X Empire 14V 2 

X Press . .- 13 

Colored — 

Fancy 15 

Lion 13 y 2 

Standard 12 

Popular 10 

Keen 08 

Wool Packing — 

Arrow 25 

Axle 21 

Anvil 17 

Dominion Wipers — 

White cotton 18 

Colored cotton 13 



change noted in this line. Below is the 
list in effect to date. 



FITTINGS— Mont. Tor 

% % 

Cast iron fittings 27 22 

Malleable bushings 30 25 

Cast bushings 30 25 

Unions 45 40 

Flanged unions 27 22 

Plugs, cast iron 27 22 

Couplings, 4 in., and under 25 25 

Do., 4% in. and larger 5 5 



MALLEABLE FITTINGS — 

New piece list adopted June 1, 1922. Discount, 
68 per cent. 



REVISION IN RANGE BOILER 
PRICES LOOKED FOR 

Toronto. 

A revision in range boiler prices is be- 
ing looked for following the firmness in 
the galvanized sheet market, noted in a 
recent issue of Sanitary Engineer. From 
recent reports on basic markets this 
firmness is still in evidence and it is 



pointed out that any change in price in 
boilers will be upward. The prevailing 
list is given below. 

RANGE BOILERS— 

Size. List Price. 

6-nullon $13 50 

12 to 15 gallon 14 00 

18-gallon 15 00 

26-gallon 16 50 

30-gallon 17 50 

35-gallon 20 50 

40-gallon 22 75- 

52-gallon 38 00 

66-gallon 60 75 

82-gallon 74 00 

100-galIon 103 00 

120-gallon 117 00 

144-gallon 164 00 

168-pallon 187 00 

l'J2-gallon 210 00 

Discounts, Standard weight, 40 per cent. 
Extra heavy, 30 per cent. 



CORRUGATED SHEETS ADVANCED 
IN PRICE 

Toronto. 

Galvanized corrugated sheets have 
reflected the recent upward trend in 
primary markets noted in Sanitary En- 
gineer and an advance of 50c per hund- 
red square feet is announced in the price 
of this product. Galvanized shingles and 
galvanized sidings are both advanced 25c 
per hundred square feet and galvanized 
flat roofing prices are increased 75c. per 
hundred square feet. Below is the list 
to be in effect on corrugated sheets on 
March 1st. 

No. 28 gauge 7 00 

No. 26 gauge 7 50 

No. 24 gauge 9 50 

No. 22 gauge 11 60 

No. 20 gauge 13 00 

No. 18 gauge 17 00 

Less 10 per cent. 
Lighter than 24 gauge and wider than 27 
inches, 75c. a square extra. 



ENAMELED WARE PRICES MAIN- 
TAINED ON A STEADY BASIS 

Toronto. 

Current prices on enameled baths, la- 
vatories and sinks have remained on a 
steady basis for some time. Business in 
this line is said to be satisfactory and 
in most cases considerably in excess of 
the same period last year. No price 
changes are looked for in the immediate 
future although the market tendency is 
distinctly firm. 

ENAMELED WARE — 



Enameled Iron Baths, 3" roll rim, 4 ft,. 

4 ft. 6 in., 5 ft 51 40 

Do., 5y 2 ft 57 10 

17x10" Apron F139 or P4045 15 30 

18x24" Apron F154 or P3845 or P3847 23 60 

18x21" Apron F169 or P4205 17 60 

18x21" Roll Rim, F197, F199 or 

P4655-6 15 40 

17x19" Roll Rim, F241 or P4345 12 60 

Sinks, Roll Rim. 16x24 in 18 10 

Do., 18 x 30 in 23 00 

Do., 20 x 30 in 24 70 

Sinks, Flat Rim— 3 only 2 only 1 only 

16x24 $7 60 $7 70 f7 80 

18x30 8 50 8 60 8 70 

20x30 9 70 9 80 9 90 



Above prices, list, less 33 1-3 per cent. 



BRASS AND NICKEL PLATED COM- 
PRESSION GOODS ARE ACTIVE 

Toronto. 

The prices on brass and nickel plated 
compression goods has shown no change 
this week. The recently advanced price 
on American markets has not been re- 
flected in local circles to date. The 
movement in this line is reported in ex- 
cess of last year and Sanitary Engineer 



Toronto Markets 

TORONTO, February 17. — The markets in all lines of plumbing, 
heating and sheet metal goods have been consistently firm for 
some time and indications point to a steady maintenance of 
prices at least at present levels. Each week has brought its changes 
in quotations, with a great majority of them higher and this week is 
no exception. The firm trend of the iron primary market has re- 
sulted in an advance in wrought iron pipe and nipples, pipe showing 
an average advance in price of 5 per cent and nipples by a reduced 
discount, about the same advance. Galvanized sheets have also re- 
flected the firm tone noted in a recent issue of Sanitary Engineer 
and while there is still a variation in local quotations, the majority 
of distributors are maintaining the higher price. General hard- 
ware, enamelled ware and tinsmiths' sundries have advanced from 
2 to 5 per cent, in the last week and putty prices were moved up 
50c per hundred lbs. 

The recent firmness noted in primary markets have been reflected 
in the quotations on practically all galvanized iron products. Cor- 
rugated sheets are now quoted 50c per hundred square feet higher, 
galvanized shingles and galvanized sidings 25c per hundred square 
feet in advance of recent quotations and eavestrough and conductor 
pipe are advanced 10% over old levels. These prices go into effect 
March 1st. 

Recent reports were to the effect that an advance had been put 
into effect on range boilers but local quotations have not been 
changed. Asbestos products are also among the lines on which a 
firm trend is reported and future developments in quotations are 
predicted. 

Manufacturers report a steady improvement in business and 
many local plants are reported running to capacity. 



34 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February 15, 1923 



was informed by a local manufacturer 
that whereas it is not usually necessary 
to operate their plant on Saturday morn- 
ing, they have been obliged to keep it 
going for the past three weeks. The 
outlook for spring business in all brass 
and nickel plated compression goods is 
described as good, the list remains as 
given below. 

COMPRESSION GOODS— 

Compression work, standard 45 /c 

fuller work, standard 30% 

Quick opening compression bibbs 43% 

Bath cocks, compression 41% 

Jenkins iron body, gate 25% 

Bath cocks, quick opening 4i% 

Basin cocks, quick opening 46% 

Flatway stop and waste cocks, standard 56% 

Roundway stop and waste cocks, standard 56% 

Brass steam cocks, standard 50% 

Radiator valves, standard 55/25% 

Do., removable discs 55/25% 

Globe, angle and check valves, standard. 25% 

Gate or straightway 25% 

Emco Globe valves 33% 

Emco check valves 33% 

Jenkins gate or straightway 16% 

Jenkins iron body, globe and angle 15% 

Jenkins Globe, angle, check and swing 

check 10% 

Jenkins iron body, gate 25% 



EAVESTROUGH AND CONDUCTOR 
PIPE PRICES ADVANCED 

Toronto. 

The firmness noted in recent issues of 
Sanitary Engineer has been borne out by 
another increase in price of 10 per cent, 
on eavestrough and conductor pipe. The 
former discount from the list price was 
70 per cent., this has now been reduced 
to 60 per cent, as shown below, the ad- 
vance to take effect March 1st. 

TROUGH (EAVB) — 
O. G. Square Bead — 

Per 100 ft. Per 100 ft. 

8 inch $15 90 15 inch 34 50 

10 inch .. . . 17 70 18 inch 44 00 

12 inch 21 20 

0. G. Round and Half Round 

8 inch 16 SO 15 inch 3."> 50 

10 inch 18 70 18 inch 45 00 

12 inch 22 20 

Less 60 per cent. 

PIPE (CONDUCTOR) — 

Plain, round or corrugated. 

Per 100 ft. in 10 ft. lengths. 

2 in., in 10 ft. lengths, list 13 40 

3 in., ii 10 ft. lengths, list 22 30 

4 in., ir. 10 ft. lengths, list 29 60 

5 in., in 10 ft. lengths, list 48 00 

6 in., in 10 ft. lengths 58 80 

Less 60 per cent. 

ELBOWS (CONDUCTOR) — 

2 inch, list 5 25 

3 inch, list 6 00 

4 inch, list 10 50 

5 inch, list 24 00 

•> inch, list 29 00 

Less 60 per cent. 



CONTINUED UPWARD PRESSURE 
NOTICEABLE IN GALVANIZED 
SHEET PRICES 

Toronto. 

The firmness noted in the quotations 
on galvanized sheets, in a recent issue of 
Sanitary Engineer is having an effect 
on quotations on this product. There is 
a slight variation in prices quoted in 
local quarters but the upward trend is 
favored in most cases. It has been 
stated that European iron has not been 
plentiful in local markets for some time 
and the domestic product has been book- 
ed ahead to such an extent that present 
deliveries are retarded. 

GALVANIZED SHEETS - 

Premier and Apollo 
10% oz 6 65 

U. S 28 base 6 25 6 50 

U.S. 26 base 5 95 6 20 

22 ;\nd 24 5 80 6 05 

18 and 20 5 65 5 90 

16 5 50 5 75 

12 and 14 5 35 5 60 

Queen's Head 

28 gauge base 7 15 

26 6 75 

24 6 45 

22 6 30 

Fleur de Lis 

28 gauge, base 6 90 

26 6 50 

24 - 6 20 

22 6 05 

An extra 40c. per 100 lbs. is charged for Key- 
stone and Premier bands copper-bearing sheets 
An extra is now charged on galvanized sheets. 
10% oz. and 28 ga.. when shipped out in sheets 
3 feet wide. 'ITie extra charged over prices shown 
in 20c. per 100 pounds. 



SOIL PIPE CONTINUES ACTIVE 
WITH NO PRICE CHANGE 
NOTED 

Toronto. 

No change has been announced in the 
price of soil pipe fittings for the pre- 
sent. The anticipations for an active 
season in this line are gradually mater- 
ializing and ^cal distributors report 
prospects for spring business to be 
bright. Below is the list of discounts 
covering soil pipe and fittings. 

SOIL PIPE — 

2 inch Less 33 1-3% 

3 inch Less 33 1-3% 

4 inch Less 33 1-3% 

5 and 6 inch Less 33 1-3% 

8 inch net 

FITTINGS — 

3 inch fittings net. 

2 to 6 inch Less 45 per cent 



IRON PIPE LIST TAKES CHANGE IN 
UPWARD DIRECTION 

Toronto. 

Wrought ircn pipe prices have again 
been revised in an upward direction fol- 
lowing the steady advance in basic mar- 
kets. The new list which supersedes list 
number 57 is given below. 

WROUGHT PIPE 

Price List Xo. 57. February. 1922. 
Standard Buttweld Pipe S/C 

Steel Gen. Wrot. Iron 

Blk. Galv. lTik. Galv. 

Size 

% in 6.00 8.00 

Vi in 4.14 6.12 7.38 9.42 

% in 4.14 6.12 7.38 9.42 

'/.in 5.27 6.72 7.57 9.10 

% in 6.44 8.05 9.20 10.93 

1 in 9.18 11.56 1326 15.81 

V/i in 12.42 15 64 17.94 21.39 

I 1 :, in 14.85 18.70 21.45 25.58 

2 in 19/9S 25.16 28.86 34.41 

2V- in 31.59 39.78 

3 in 41.31 52.02 

3''. in 53 38 66.24 

4 in 63.22 78.48 

Standard La-^weld Pipe S/C 
Per 100 feet. 

Steel Gen. Wrot. Iron 

Blk. Galv. Blk. Galv. 

Size 

2 in 23.31 28.49 32.19 37.74 

2V-i in 34.52 42.71 48.56 57.33 

3 in 45.14 55.85 63.50 74.97 

%\{. in 54.28 67.16 76.36 90.16 

I in. 64.31 79.57 90.47 106.82 

4Vj in T4.93 92.71 110.00 1.30 

5 in 87.32 108.04 1.29 1.51 

6 in 1.13 1.40 1.67 1.96 

7 m \M 1.83 2.14 2.55 

SL in 1.55 1.93 2.25 2.68 

8 in 1.79 2.22 2.59 3.08 

" in 2.17 2.69 . . .'. 

101, in ... 2.02 2.50 2.91 3.46 

10 in 2.60 3.21 3.75 4.45 



ingot metals there is again a decided ad- 
vance effecting copper, tin and lead. 

SOLDER — 

Wire, lb 32 

Strictly, lb 24Vj 

Guaranteed, lb 27% 

Commercial, lb 26 

Wiping, lb 24>/j 

CLOSET COMBINATIONS AND 
BOWLS REMAIN UNCHANGED 

Toronto. 

No changes are reported in V\t prices 
governing closet combinations, bowls, 
tanks and seats. Local trade in these 
lines is said to be moderately good and 
in excess of last season. The recent re- 
duction in price in closet combinations 
and tanks has been adopted in outside 
markets corresponding with the recently 
revised list given be'.ow. 

CLOSET COMBINATIONS— Each 
Oak, Wood 'Dink, Oak W. S. Seat and Cover 24 00 
Oak Vitro Tank, Oak W.S. teat and Cover 21 Ju 

Oak Pi r.-.yfoot Tank, Oak W S. Seat iiild 

C-,ver 24 01 

Oak Wood Tank Oak P.H., ffat and Cov.v 21 50 
Glik Vitro Tank. Oak P.H. Stat and Covar 2t 50 
White Vitro Oak Woodstrip Seat and Cover 24 50 
White ; Pussyfoot Oak Woodsliip, Seat and 

Cover 25 50 

White Pussyfoot, Woodstrip Seat and Cover 25 50 
White Vitro Tank. Mahog.. P.H. Seat an<! 

Cover 26 50 

White Pussyfoot, Mahog., P.H. Seat and 

Cover 26 50 

White Vitro or Pussyfoot, oak. P.H. Seat 

and Cover 26 00 

Mahog. Pussyfoot, Mahogany P.H., Seat and 

Cover 27 00 

Vitreous China Tank. Oak P.H., Seat and 

Cover 27 00 

Enam. Iron Tank. Oak P.H. Seat and Cover 28 75 
Vitreous China Tank. Mahog., P.H. Seat 

and Cover 29 00 

Enam. Iron Tank. Mahog.. P.H., Seat and 

Cover 28 75 

ADDITIONS OR REDUCTIONS ON ABOVE— 
If supplied less bend or offset, deduct. . 50 
If suplpied with reverse trap bowl, add 1 50 
If supplied with BOT Reverse Trap bowl 

Add 

If- supplied with plain syphon jet bowl 

Add 

If supplied with N.P. stock cock on sup- 
ply Pipe, Add 

If supplied less brass and rubber floor 

flange and bolts. Deduct 60 

If supplied less bend or offset, deduct. . 
If supplied less N. P. supply pipe deduct 
CLOSET BOWLS— 

Washdown bowl with spud 10 60 

Reverse trap bowl, with spud 12 10 

Syphon jet bowl, with spud 17 00 

"Richelieu" bowl 10 50 

CLOSET TANKS— LOW DOWN — 

Oak wood. Tank and inside fittings with 

bend and supply 13 20 

Mahog. Wood Tank, and inside Fittings 

with bend and supply 15 40 

Oak Vitro or Pussyfoot Tank and inside 

Fittings with bend and supply 13 45 

White Vitro or Pussyfoot Tank and Inside 

Fittings with bend and supply 33 40 

White Enam. Tank F.-585 or P.9262, or 

White Vitreous China Belmeade Tank 

with fittings las above) 18 00 

CLOSET SEATS— 

Oak Rich. Seat and Cover to wall 3 50 

Oak Woodstrip Seat and Cover with bolts 3 F0 
Oak Woodstrip Seat less Cover with bolts 2 90 

Oak Post Hinge Seat and Cover 3 85 

Mahog. Fin. Post Hinge Seat and Cove. - 4 7? 



2 25 



00 



1 50 



50 
70 



A DECIDED ADVANCE IN INGOT 
METALS 

Toronto. 

Bar solder has reflected the recent 
price advances on basic metals and a 
raise of .01c per lb. is announced. In 



GOOD VOLUME OF TRADE IN 
BOILER TUBES 

Toronto. 

Current business in boiler tubes is 
described as very good for this time of 
the year, with a distinct upward tend- 
ency recorded in both primary and do- 
mestic markets. No price changes have 
been made, however, from recent price 
lists, but the current levels shown below 
(Confned on page 36) 





This actual Photograph shows a 
"LITTLE GIANT" Pipe Wrench 
turning a pipe '4 inch from a wall. A 
pipe almost inaccessible to the ordin- 
ary pipe wrench. 

Notice the firm positive grip - Notice 
that almost a half turn can be made 
without '"ratcheting." 



Wouldn't you find this wrench 
handy a dozen times a day ? 
You would. 



One thing more — 




No matter how "handy" the "LITTLE GIANT" might be 
if it didn't have "guts" it wouldn't make a friend in the 
world. 

But it has ! It has only three parts- handle, jaw and nut -none 
of the pins, springs, frames, etc. that are always breaking in 
the ordinary wrench. 

Uncle Sam says 14 inch wrenches must withstand stresses of 
2,800 inch pounds. The 14 inch "LITTLE GIANT" has 
repeatedly tested over 4,700 inch pounds without bending or 
weakening. It is made to stand rough treatment. Prove out 
the "LITTLE GIANT" by actual trial. Get one through 
your regular source of tool supply cr write us direct. 




PATENTED FEBRUARY 4, 1913 



IT GETS INTO THE CORNERS 





CORPOg ATI O N 



1 frr 




36 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and S-teamfitter February 15, 1923 



are stated to represent replacement val- 
ues. Distributors also state that they 
would be justified in raising prices to 
correspond with 'the present upward 
trend of the markets. Basic conditions 
in the United States are described as 
strong, and while the demand is not un- 
usually heavy, certain physical condi- 
tions prevailing in mill centres affect 
operation and delivery. Following are 
current local boiler tube quotations: 

BOILER TUBES — 

Seamless Lapweld 
% inch 19 00 

1 inch 20 00 

1% inch 22 00 

1% inch 24 00 

1% inch 24 00 23 00 

2 inch . 22 00 19 00 

2% inch ' ■. ... 24 00 21 50 

91* inch 27 00 23 50 

« inch 34 00 28 50 

3V4 inch 36 00 33 00 

3 it inch 38 00 32 00 

4 inch 50 00 42 00 



FIRM TREND REPORTED IN ASBES- 
TOS PRODUCTS 

Toronto. 

There has been no change reported in 
the quotations on asbestos air cell pipe 
covering, asbestos boiler covering or as- 
bestos paper. It is pointed out however 
that a very firm trend is in evidence in 
primary sources and that under existing 
circumstances there is no possibility of 
any reductions in this line but that high- 
er levels may be looked for. Below is a 
list of the quotations in effect. 

ASBESTOS PRODUCTS — 
Pipe Covering — 

Air cell, 4 ply 50 per cent, off list. 

Air cell, 3 ply 55 per cent, off list. 

Air cell, 2 ply 57% per cent, off list. 

Boiler Covering $1.50 — $2.00 per bag. 

Asbestos Sheathing $8.00 per 100 ibs. 

Magnesia pipe covering less 35 per cent. 



Winnipeg Markets 

WINNIPEG, February 17. — The upward trend is still evident in 
local markets. Steam and water radiators are advanced in 
price revised discounts are in effect on boiler elbows and coup- 
lings and cast iron fittings reflect the firmness evident in primary 
sources. There is also a firm trend noted in cotton waste and soil- 
pipe and fittings. 



STEAM AND WATER RADIATORS 
AT HIGHER LEVELS 

Winnipeg. 

There is a revision in discounts on 
steam and water radiators. Two and 
four column steam radiators are quoted 
at less 44 per cent, off list price, and 
water radiators at less 43 per cent. 



at 25 per cent, and plugs at 20 per cent, 
off list price. Flange union standards 
show a revision and are quoted at less 
15 per cent, while dart flange unions are 
quoted at net list. Companion flanges 
are quoted at less 20 per cent., floor 
flanges at less 25 per cent., and branch 
tees at 15 per cent. 



WALL RADIATORS SHOW UPWARD 
TREND 

Winnipeg. 

Wall radiators of both water and 
steam have shown an upward trend in 
price. Hospital radiators as well have 
also moved upwards. Wall radiators are 
quoted at list price less 40 per cent, and 
steam hospital radiators at list price less 
36 per cent, and water at 35 per cent. 
Wall radiator brackets are quoted at net 
list price, while radiator buttons are 
quoted at less 10 per cent, off list price. 



MALLEABLE IRON FITTINGS AT 
HIGHER LEVELS 

Winnipeg. 

Malleable iron fittings of class A, B 
and C are now quoted at less 55 per cent, 
off list price. Crossovers are quoted at 
less 50 per cent, off list price and union 
elbows and tees at less 50 and 5 per cent. 



REVISION IN PRICE ON BOILER 
ELBOWS AND COUPLINGS 

Winnipeg. 

There is a revision in quotations on 
boiler elbows and couplings and latest 
discounts are 50 and 5 per cent, off list 
price. Unions show a revision and are 
quoted at 35 per cent., while Jefferson 
unions are quoted at 20 per cent, off list 
price. 



HIGHER DISCOUNT ON RADIATOR 
VALVES 

Winnipeg. 

Radiator valves and elbows show a 
revision in discount. Rough body radia- 
tor valves with Jenkins disc are quoted 
at list prices less 55 per cent. Radiator 
elbows are quoted at the same discount. 
Detroit packless radiator valves are 
quoted at list price less 20 per cent. 



CAST IRON FITTINGS AT REVISED 
QUOTATIONS 

Winnipeg. 

Cast iron fittings, including elbows, 
tees, crosses, return bends, caps and 
lock nuts, show a revision in discounts 
of 15 per cent, off list price. Reducers 
and eccentric reducers are quoted at the 
same discount. Bushings are quoted 



STEADY TONE TO GALVANIZED 
RANGE BOILERS i 

Winnipeg. 

Since the recent advance range boilers 
are ruling firm and quotations are as 
follows: 

RANGE BOILERS — (Galvanized) — 

18 ga., ?10.25; 30 ga., $11.35; 35 ga., $12.45; 
40 ga., $17.05; 52 ga., $24.60; 66 ga., $35.30; 
82 ga., $50.00; 100 ga., $65.00; 120 ga., $76.25. 
RANGE BOILERS— (Extra Heavy)— 

30 ga., $13.50. 
Boiler Stands — 

12 in. $2.40; 13" $2.56; 14" $2.64; 16" $2.84; 
19" $3.24; 20" $3.74; 22" $4.05; 24" $4.45. 



FIRMNESS IN SOIL PIPE MARKET 

Winn peg. 

Firmness is described as prevail- 
ing in the trend of soil pipe fittings. The 
market remains with a steady tone and 
although trading is quiet at the present 
time, indications are for increased activi- 
ties with the approach of spring and 
summer. 



STRONG TONE TO COTTON WASTE 

Winnipeg. 

There is a strong tone to the cotton 
market and quotations on cotton waste 
are ruling firm. The following lines are 
quoted as follows: 

COTTON WASTE — 

Full bales, per 100 pounds 17 25 

, Broken quantities 18Vi 

10 pound packages 20 

R.E.M. Full bales 100 pounds 20 00 

Broken quantities 21 

COLORED COTTON— 

Full bales 100 pounds 14 75 

Broken quantities 15% 

WOOL WASTE— 

100 pounds 20 00 

Broken quantities 21 



RURAL SEWAGE DISPOSAL 
SYSTEM 

(Continued from page 19) 
and the results are available, there does 
not appear to be any logical reason why 
such information based upon such ex- 
perience should not be taken advantage 
o: and followed out. 

Why Cultivating Chamber Must Be 
Larger 

It is estimated that when sewage' en- 
ters the first or cultivating chamber, 
that it requires from 36 to 48 hours to 
allow the anaerobic bacteria to digest, or 
break down the solids. This being the 
case, the raw 7 sewage requires to be held 
back for a rather longer period than is 
required to permit the fluid, (which may 
be charged with anaerobic bacteria) to 
be freed from undigested sewage in sus- 
pension, and once the period of say 36 to 
48 hours has elapsed, the effluent is 
more than likely to be ready to dis- 
charge up and through the centre pipe, 
previously shown on septic tank designs 
and known as fitting number 2. 

That is the reason why the cultivating 
chamber must be larger than the dosing 
chamber. The writer has been asked 
what objections there would be to having 
both tanks the same depth. The fact 
that the syphon discharges when the sew- 
age has reached a height of 17 inches 
would mean that it would be too low if 
placed on the bottom of a compartment 
the same depth as the cultivating cham- 
ber, or if both tanks were made shallow, 
say the same depth as the dosing cham- 
ber, the cultivating chamber would havo 
to be too long or too wide to contain 
sufficient sewage, and furthermore, there 
would not be sufficient depth of sewage 
for the anaerobic bacteria to work in a 
vertical direction. 

(Continued in next issue) 



February 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



37 




■ I 




KERR VALVES^M 



Iron Body, Bronze (Mounted 

with Outside Screw and Yoke. 

These gate valves are specially designed to comply 
with the requirements of the Factory Mutual Fire 
Insurance Companies' specifications for Sprinkler 
Equipment. 

Bronze bushed Stuffing Boxes, and Malleable Iron 
Glands are employed, and stems are of the dimensions 
and strength required on this exacting work. 

Commercial valves of our manufacture are supplied 
in this pattern and with this equipment, thus insuring 
a remarkably high class valve. 

The valves are compact in design, sturdy construction, 
and modern throughout. 



Ill 



7 



Specify Kerr KEYSTONE Gate Valves. 
Every valve tested. 



'//*> KERR ENGINE COMPANY 

LIMITED 

Valve Manufacturers 

ONTA 




NO. 62. 
2 1-2 in. to 4 in. 



WALKERVILLL 



1 I H I 



Sydenham Steam Cocks 




200 lbs. pressure is the test every Sydenham Steam Cock is 
put under. That's your guarantee that it is : — 

Well ground, making good, smooth, tight joints ; 

Made of good red steam metal to stand up in any 
usage ; 

Made in heavy proportions to withstand strain in in- 
stallation. 

Rigidly inspected. 



Carried in stock in all sizes from *° 2". 
Try the Sydenham on your next order 

Jhe W allaceburg grass & Jron M anufacturing Company, L imited 

WALLACEBURG, ONT. 



No. 58 



TORONTO OFFICE: 
10 Wellington St. E., Phone Main 2355 
Mr. L. N. Vanstone 



MONTREAL OFFICE: 
10 Victoria St., Phone Uptown 945 
Mr. G. M. Price 



WINNIPEG: 
Moncrieff & Endress, Ltd., Gait Bldg., 
Telephone: A. 9135 



38 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steam fitter February 15, 1 923 





Hamilton. Ont. 



AIR COMPRESSORS 

Smart Turner Machine Co., Ltd. 
AIR LINE SYSTEMS 

C. A. Dunham, Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., Man 
Chester. Eng. 
ALUMINUM CASTINGS 

Fittings. Limited, Oshawa. 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
AIR VALVES 

Beaton & Caldwell Mfg. Co., New Britain, 
Conn. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

C. A. Dunham Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

J. H. Wiliams Co., Brooklyn. New York. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers. Ltd.. Man- 
chester, Eng. 

Wallaceburg Brass & Iron Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Wal- 
laeeburg, Ont. 

Wnlverino Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 
BATHS, STEEL 

Steel Trough & Machine Co.. 'Ltd.. Tweed Ont 
ATMOSPHERIC STEAM HEATING 

J. E Farrell. 210 Galley Ave.. Toronto. Ont 
BATHROOM FITTINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Gendron Mfg. Co.. Toronto 
BENDING SPRINGS 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd.. Toronto 
BOILERS. STEAM OR HOT WATER 

Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto. 

Lord & Burnham Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 

Spencer Heater Co., Ltd.. Toronto. Ont. 

Warden King. Ltd.. Montreal 
BOILER FEED PUMPS 

Smart Turner Machine Co., Ltd., Hamilton. Ont 
BOILER FEED REGULATORS 

Emnire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto 

J. E. Farrell. 210 Galley Ave.. Toronto. Ont 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co.. 23 River Street, Toronto 
BOILER STANDS 

Fittings. Limited, Oshawa. 
BOLTS, EYE 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn. N Y 
BOLTS AND NUTS 

Fittings Limited. Oshawa 
BRASS GOODS. VALVES. ETC. 

Canadian Brass Co.. Ltd.. Gait, 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 

C. A. Durham Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Empire Mfg.. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto 

Fittings, Limited. Oshawa. 

Gait Brass Co., Limited, Gait. 

Kerr Engine Co., Ltd., Walkerville. 

James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co.. Toronto 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd.. Sarnia. Ont 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Toronto 
Hamilton. 

United Brassfounders and Engineers, Ltd. 
Manchester. Eng. 

Wallaceburg Brass & Iron Mfg. Co.. Ltd,. Wal- 
laceburg. Ont. 
Wolverine Ltd.. Toronto. Ont. 
W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto 

BRASS PIPE AND TUBE 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd.. Toronto 
Empire Mfg. Ltd.. London and Toronto 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont 
United Brassfounders & Engineers Ltd 

Manchester. Eng. 
Wolverine. Ltd., Toronto, Ont 

CASTINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Fittings, Limited. Oshawa 

CELLAR DRAINERS 

Gait Brass Co., Limited, Gait. 
Empire Mfg. Ltd.. London and Toronto 
James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co.. Toronto 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto, and 
Hamilton. 

CIRCULATORS 

J. E. Farrell. 210 Galley Ave., Toronto, Ont. 
J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Grant E. Cole Co.. 23 River Street, Toronto. 

CHAINS 

Oshawa. 

Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Ont. 



Fittings. Limited, 
J. H. Williams & 
CLOSETS 

Canada Metal Co 
Empire M-fg. Co., . 
Gait Brass Co., Limited, Gait. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg., Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

Steel Trough & Machine Co., Ltd., Tweed, Ont 



. Ltd., Toronto. 
London and Toronto. 



CLOSETS— Chemical 

Steel Trough & Machine Co., Ltd., Tweed, Ont. 
CONDENSATION UNITS 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

J: E. Farrell, 210 Galley Ave.. Toronto, Ont. 

Smart Turner Machine Co., Ltd., Hamilton. Ont. 

The Westco Pumps, Limited, Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street. Toronto. 
COUNTRY RESIDENCE EQUIPMENTS 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Sarnia. Ont. 

Smart Turner Machine Co.. Ltd., Hamilton. Ont. 
COUPLINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Fittings Limited. Oshawa. 
DAMPER REGULATORS 

C. A. Dunham Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 
DRAINAGE FITTINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co.. Ltd.. London and Toronto. 

Fittings Limited, Oshawa. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd.. Man- 
chester, Eng. 

Warden King, Ltd.. Montreal. 
DRAIN PIPE SOLVENT 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill. Ltd.. Toronto. 

Hercules Chemical Co.. Inc., New York City. 
DRINKING FOUNTAINS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg., Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. » 
DROP FORGINGS 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
EJECTORS, STEAM 

Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
ENAMELWARE 

Amherst Foundry Co., Ltd., Amherst. N.S. 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

Gait Brass Co., Limited, Gait. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

Port Hope Sanitary Mfg. Co.. Ltd . Port Hope 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co.. Ltd.. Toronto. 
ELECTRIC PUMPING MACHINERY 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia. Ont. 

Smart Turner Machine Co., Ltd., Hamilton, OiiL 
EXPANSION TANKS 

Toronto Hardware Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
FITTINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto, 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

Fittings Limited. Oshawa. 

James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Sarnia. Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 

Warden King. Ltd.. Montreal. 
FLUSHOMETERS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd . Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co.. Ltd., London ard Toronto. 

Gait Brass Co . Ltd., Gait. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

Wolverine Ltd.. Toronto, Ont. 
FLOOR AND CEILING PLATES 

Beaton & Cadwell Mfg. Co., New Britain. Conn. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

Fittings, Limited. Oshawa. 

Wolverine Ltd.. Toronto, Ont. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
FURNACES 

Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto. 

Warden King, Ltd., Montreal. 

Spencer Heater Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Hamilton Stove & Heater Co., Homilton. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne, Hamilton. 

Hall-Zryd, Hespeler, Ont. 

Vulcan Co., London, Ont. 
GASOLINE ENGINES 

Empire Mfg. Co.. Ltd., London and Toronto 
GAS WATER HEATERS 

Bastian-Morley. Limited, Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co.. Ltd., London and Toronto. 





.lames Morrison Brass Mfg.. Toronto. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Sarnia. Ont. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill. Ltd., Toronto. 
GALVANIZING 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 
HEAT GENERATORS 

Gait Brass Co., Gait, Ont. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street. Toronco. \ 
HEATING APPARATUS 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Smart Turner Machine Co.. Ltd., Hamilton. Ont. 

J. E. Farrell. 210 Gallev Ave.. Toronto, Ont. 
HEATERS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co.. 23 River Street, Toronto. 

Lord & Burnham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Smart Turner Machine Co., Ltd.. Hamilton, Ont. 

Warden King, Ltd.. Montreal and Toronto. 

W. H. Cinningham & Hill. Ltd., Toronto. 
HEATING SYSTEMS 

C. A. Dunham Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 

J. E. Farrell, 210 Galley Ave.. Toronto. Ont. t 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
HOIST HOOKS 

J. H. Williams & Co.. Brooklyn, N.Y. 
JAPANNING 

Fittings. Limited. Oshawa. 
KEROSENE WATER HEATERS 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill. Ltd., Tororco. 
LAUNDRY TUBS 

The Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Toronto i 
Hamilton. 

Stee! Trough & Machine Co., Ltd.. Tweed. Ont. 
LAVATORIES 

Steel Trough & Machine Co., Ltd., Tweed. Ont. 

LEAD 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Sarnia. Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Toronto, 
Hamilton. 
MACHINISTS' TOOLS 

J. H. Williams & Co.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
MALLEABLE IRON CASTINGS 

Gurney Foundry Co.. Limited, Toronto. 

Fittings, Limited. Oshawa. 
MACHINE BOLTS AND NUTS 

Fittings. Limited. Oshawa. 
MIXING VALVES 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd.. Sarnia, Ont 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

Port Hope Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Port Hope. 
PACKING 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
RADIATOR FOOT RESTS 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

Wolverine Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill. Ltd., Toronto. 
PACKLESS RADIATOR VALVES 

Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville. 

C. A. Dunham Co.. Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 
PIPE AND RADIATOR HANGERS 

Beaton & Cadwell Mfg. Co., New Britain, 
Conn. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

Healy-Ruff Company. Minneapolis, Minn. 
PIPE, BLACK AND GALVANIZED 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Canadian Tube and Iron Co., Ltd.. Montreal. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 
PIPE CLEANSER 

Chamberlain Desolvo Co.. Ltd.. Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co.. Ltd., London and Toronto. 

Hercules Chemical Co., Inc., New York City. 

Wolverine. Ltd.. Toronto, Ont. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
PIPE JOINT COMPOUNDS 

Wolverine, Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill. Ltd., Toronto. 
PIPE, SOIL AND FITTINGS 

Anthes Foundry Co., Toronto and Winnipeg. 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 



February 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



39 




Don't Argue! 

You're wasting your time, patience and good-temper 
when you argue in the face of cold hard facts. 

You may be able to get along by basing your estimates 
on stale price information from irregular sources. You 
may be fairly certain that you're making a profit. But- 
Cold facts tell you plainly that only positive, reliable 
price information can protect you. 

ALLPRISER protects you on every job, small or large, 
by giving you an accurate, day-to-day service on prices. 
The successful Sanitary Engineer carries his ALLPRISER 
in his pocket at all times. 

Get acquainted with ALLPRISER to-day. 



WRITE TO 



K. B. ALLISON 

4 Irwin Avenue - Toronto, Ont. 



The Ideal Sewage System 

Includes a "Chicago" Pump 



Mt. Dennis Public 
School, Mt. Dennis, Ont. 

This sewage disposal system 
is considered the "last word" 
in sanitation and efficiency. 

Mr. Edwin Newsome's article 
in the January 1st issue of 
the Sanitary Engineer de- 
scribed the whole layout 
completely and vividly. The 
pumping equipment which he 
said played such an impor- 
tant part in the whole plan 
is a "CHICAGO" product. 



Our Engineering Department is at the disposal of 
any architect, engineer, contractor, plumber or 
steamfitter who is in need of information or assist- 
ance in connection with their pumping problems. 
Get in touch with our Toronto representative or 
come to us direct. 

Chicago Pump Company 

D. M. Allen, Representative 
50 DUNDONALD ST., TORONTO, ONT., 
Main Office and Works: 
2300-2336 Wolfram St., Chicago, 111. 





AMONG a plumber's best friends 
are his tools and, among his tools, 
many a plumber claims Williams' 
"Vulcan" Chain Pipe Vise as his best 
friend. 

It's the only Pipe Vise made entirely 
of wrought steel. 3 sizes for Vg to 8 
in. pipe. 

Ask your dealer. Literature? 

J. H. WILLIAMS & CO., Limited 

"The Drop-Forging Peopl"" 

77 Thorold Road, St. Catharines, Ontario 



40 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February 15, 1923 



Toronto Hardware Mfg., Co.. Toronto. 

Warden King, Ltd., Montreal. 
PIPE THREADING TOOLS AND MACHINERY 

Borden Canadian Co., Toronto. 

A. B. Jardine & Co.. Hespeler. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd.. Toronto. 
PIPE WRENCHES 

J. H. Williams Co., Brooklyn, New York. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill. Ltd., Toronto. 
PLUMBERS' TOOLS 

J. H. Williams & Co., Montreal, Que. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
PNEUMATIC WATER SUPPLY TANKS 

Empire Mfg. Co.. London and Toronto. 

Steel Trough & Machine Co., Ltd., Tweed, Ont. 
PORCELAIN WARE 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
PUMPS 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Limited. 

Smart Turner Machine Co.. Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 

Steel Trough & Machine Co., Ltd., Tweed, Ont. 

The Westco Puimps Limited, Toronto. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
PUMPING SYSTEMS, AUTOMATIC 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., ' Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Limited. 

Smart Turner Machine Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 

The Westco Pumps, Limited, Toronto. 

Beaton & Cadwell Mfg. Co., New Britain, Conn. 
RADIATORS 

Gumey Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto. , 

Lord & Burnham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Warden King Ltd., Montreal. 
RADIATOR HANGERS 

Healy Ruff Company. 
RADIATOR NIPPLES 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 
RADIATOR TRAPS (STEAM) 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co.. 23 River Street, Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Sarnia. Ont. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers Ltd., Man- 
chester, Eng. 
RIVETS 

Fittings. Limited, Oshawa. 
RANGE BOILERS 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

The Canadian John Wood Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Toronto Hardware Mfg. Co.. Toronto. 
REDUCING PRESSURE VALVES 
Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
C. A. Dunham Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 
J. E. Farrell. 210 Galley Ave.. Toronto. Ont. 



H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Sarnia, Ont. 
United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 

RETURN TILTING TRAPS 

J. E. Farrell, 210 Galley Ave.. Toronto, Ont. 
Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street. Toronto. 
ROOF FLANGES AND FLASHINGS 
Canada Metal Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto, 
Hamilton. 

SEPTIC TANK VALVES AND SYPHONS 

Anthes Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia. Ont. 
SINK BRACKETS 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 
SOCKETS. WIRE ROPE 

J. H. Williams & Co., Montreal, Que. 
SOLDER 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
STANDS. VISE, PORTABLE 

H. P. Martin & Sons. Owenshoro, Kentucky. 
STEAM SPECIALTIES 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

J. E. Farrell, 210 Galley Ave., Toronto, -Ont. 

Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 

Smart Turner Machine Co.. Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 

STEAM TRAPS 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

J. E. Farrell, 210 Galley Ave.. Toronto, Ont. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
STORAGE TANK HEATERS 

J. E. Farrell, 210 Galley Ave., Toronto, Ont. 
STOVES 

. Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto. 
STOVES. GAS AND COAL 

Gurney Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
SUMP PUMPS 

Smart Turner Machine Co.. Ltd.. Hamilton. Ont. 

SWIVELS. HOOK 

J. H. Williams & Co.. Brooklyn, N.Y. 
SYSTEM— ELECTRIC 

Steel Trough & Machine Co., Ltd.. Tweed. Ont. 
SYSTEMS— SCHOOL 

Steel Trough & Machine Co., Ltd., Tweed. Ont. 
TANKS— GASOLINE 

Steel Trough & Machine Co., Ltd., Tweed, Ont. 



TANKS. STEEL 

The Canadian John Wood Mfg. Co.. Toronto 
TANKS— STORAGE 

Steel Trough & Machine Co., Ltd., Tweed, Ont. 
TANK BULBS, (RUBBER) 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
THUMB SCREWS AND NUTS 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
TOOLS 

Wolverine, Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

J. H. Williams & Co.. Brooklyn, N.Y. 
W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
TORCHES 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill. Ltd., Toronto. 
UNIONS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Sarnia, Ont. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
VAPOR HEATING SYSTEMS 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
VISES, CHAIN, CLAMP, MOUNT 

J. H. Williams & Co.. Brooklyn. N.Y. 
VITRO TANKS 

Gait Brass Co.. Ltd.. Gait. 
VACUUM SYSTEMS OF HEATING 

C. A. Dunham Co.. Ltd.. Toronto. 

Smart Turner Machine Co., Ltd., Hamilton. Ont. 
VALVES 

Empire Mfg. Co.. London and Toronto. 
Jenkins Bros., Ltd., Montreal, Que. 
The Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
United Brassfounders & Engineers Ltd., 

Manchester, Eng. 
WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

Smart Turner Machine Co., Ltd., Hamilton. Ont.. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Hamilton. 

Steel Trough & Machine Co.. Ltd.. Tweed. Ont 

The Westco Pumps, Limited, Toronto 
WASHERS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill. Ltd., Toronto 
WASHING MACHINES 

Gurney Foundry Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 
WRENCHES, SET, DROP FORGED, 
ENGINEERS, SOCKET AND CHAIN PIPE 

J. H. Williams & Co.. Brooklyn, N.Y. 
WROUGHT COUPLINGS AND NIPPLES 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Fittings. Ltd., Oshawa. 




Fig. 153. 




Buy Your Heating and 
Plumbing Machinery 
Direct from the Maker 



You can save real money and at the same time 
be absolutely certain of getting what you want 
when you deal directly with us. 

Smart Turner equipment includes Automatic 
Feed Pumps — both steam and motor driven, 
Boiler Feed Pumps, Foot Valves and Strainers, 
Sump Pumps, Steam and Oil Separators. 



Write to-day for catalogue and prices 



The Smart Turner Machine Co, 

Limited 

Hamilton Canada 




No. 115 Screwed Foot 
Valve. 




Fig. W-155. 



Fig. W-202. 



February 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, Pl 



UMBER AND STEAM FITTER 



41 




For a Satisfactory Completion 
Use a Floor and Ceiling Plate 

A No. 10-A Narrow Flange Plate like the one 
illustrated is just the kind that will suit you. 
Steel Hinged Plate Flanges V wide. 
These plates cover up all places marred by 
boring, etc. 



Highly finished. 
Especially de- 
signed for twin 
connection "Nar- 
row" Made in 
1-2 inch to 2 
inches inclusive. 
Has 1 inch 
flange made in 
all sizes from i j 
to 6 inches in- 
clusive. 




the 
ob- 



Gem No. 4, 
Automatic Air 
Valve. 

Made of 
best brass 
kainable. 
Equipped with 
high grade car- 
bon. Guaran- 
teed. 

Catalogue sent 
on requfcst. 




The Beaton & Cadwell Mfg. Co. 

New Britain, Conn. 

EASTERN AGENTS: ONTARIO AGENTS: 

J. R. Devercaux & Co.. 602 L. N. Vanstone, s Wellingt 
New Birks Bklg., Montreal Street E., Toronto. Canada. 

WESTERN AGENTS: 
A. E. Hinds &. Co.. Chambel of 
Commerce. Winnipeg. 




THE TRADE 

Is Respectfully Cautioned 
to specify 

RIVETED 
RANGE BOILERS 

Made by the old reliable 

TORONTO HARDWARE 
MFG. CO., LIMITED 



A Size to suit Every one || 
of your Customers 



No task is too small, none too 
large for Royal Automatic 
Storage Gas Water Heaters. 

Doctors, dentists, barber shops, 
clubs, apartments, schools, 
theatres, restaurants, hotels 
there is a type of "Royal" to 
meet every need for instant 
hot water service. 

At present low prices you can 
sell a Royal as easily as an 
ordinary heater. 



Sold only by or 
plumbers. 



through 



Write for full information. 

Bastian-Morley Ltd. 

125 Hanson Street Toronto 




.Kou&L 



Automatic GasWater Heaters 



The Everlasting 
Veneer Toilet Seat 




Strong, Clean 
Hygienic 

This reliable, dependable 
toilet seat is made of r i 
and 9-ply. air-seasoned 
wood veneer, held to- 
gether by our special 
wood cement. This ce- 
ment is proof against 
heat, cold or dampness. 
The veneering is distri- 
buted according to the 
strain and wear required 
of the different parts. 
The Everlasting Seat will 
never crack, warp or 
split. 



It is a splendid seat for use in cold, damp basements 
where closets must be installed. The Everlasting Toilet 
Seat will meet, and successfully resist, these severe con- 
ditions of moisture, changing temperature, etc. 



Canadian 
Veneering Company, 
Incorporated 

Acton Vale Quebec 



42 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and jteamfitter i ebruary 15, 11)23" 




Rates for Classified Advertising 

Advertisements under this heading 3c per word for first insertion; 2c for each subsequent insertion. 

Where answers come to Box number in our care to be forwarded, 5 cents extra per insertion must 
be added to cover postage, etc. 

Contractions count as one word, but five figures (as $1,000), are allowed as one word. 

Rates (payable in advance). When panels are desired a charge of $2.50 is made for a panel 1 
inch deep by 2Vfe inches wide. Minimum charge for any ad. $1.00. 



WANTED 



AMERICAN MANUFACTURER WOULD LIKE 
to get in touch with live jobber or specialty 
house in plumbing supplies, to act as Canadian 
representatives for complete line of Roof Flash- 
ings. Medicine Cabinets, Shower Bath Cabinets. 
Radiator Shields, etc. Apply Box 836. Sanitary- 
Engineer. Toronto. 



Sanitary Engineer 



is the logical medium to 
use if you have a message 
for the Plumbing and 
Heating trade of Canada 



ENGLISH FIRM wishes to purchase 
large quantity of new and good secondhand 
screwed and socketted tubes, sizes 2" to 
6". Also Weldless Loose Flanged Tubes. 
Writes "Tubes" c/o Taylers, 30 Fleet St., 
London, England. 



FOR SALE 



pOR SALE— PLUMBING, HEATING AND 
tinsmithing business, established twelve years, 
in one of the best cities in Western Canada. 
Agency for a leading line of furnaces. Sickness 
the only cause for selling. Box 224, Hardware & 
Metal. Toronto. 



ADDRESSING MACHINE FOR SALE— WE 
have a complete Belknap Addressing Equip- 
ment for sale. This equipment is still in use in 
our Subscription Department and is in excellent 
working order. We have placed an attractive 
price on this outfit, and would advise manufac- 
turers or merchants having a mailing list to 
let us tell you how it will save you money. We 
will give a guarantee as to the proper working 
condition of this equipment. The MacLean Pub- 
lishing Co., Ltd.. 143 University Avenue. Toronto, 
Ontario. 



yAYLOR SAFES FOR SALE— RARE OPPOR- 
tunity to secure a safe at small cost. They 
are in splendid condition. Inside dimensions and 
prices are as follows: 15 in. deep, 2 ft. 6 in. wide, 

3 ft. llio in. high, fitted with built-in compart- 
ment. Price $250.00. 18 in. deep, 2 ft. 8 in. wide, 

4 ft. 5 in. high, fitted with steel compartment 
Price $200.00 Apply Box No. 701, Sanitary En- 
gineer, Toronto. 



Are your WANTS 
Supplied? 

Are you looking for help? 
Business for sale or to buy? 
A position or an agency? 
Have you anything to sell? 

Any of these wants may be taken 
care of at small cost through the 
medium of Sanitary Engineer 
Want Ad. columns. 

Read the 
Want Ad. Page 




Are These The Opportunities You're Looking For? 

Fan Heating and Ventilating Engineering is the pinnacle of all other forms of heating, and 
of all branches of steam fitting and sheet metal work. It prepares you for: 

1. For Employers it enlarges their business opportunities 100%. 

2. Employees it raises to Foremanship of a large shop. 

3. Or as Designing Engineer of some large Heating Contractor, 
t. As an intelligent Salesman of Heating Appliances. 

5. As Chief Engineer with a Heating or Furnace Manufacturing Co. 

6. Later a Consulting Engineer to Architects and Building Contractors, etc. 

Which of These Are Vou Working for? 

Full Information Free. Select Your Course. 

[ ] Fan Heating and Ventilating Engineering. [ ] Sheet Metal Design and Pattern Drafting. 
[ ] Business Management, for office folks. 



ST. LOUIS TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 



4543 Clayton Avenue 



O. W. Kothe, Prin. 



St. Louis, Mo. 



February 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, Pl 



MBER AND STEAMFITTER 



13 



Index to Advertisers 



Allison, K. B 39 

Amherst Foundry Co., Ltd 44 

Anthes Foundry Co 4-5 

Bastian-Morley 41 

Beaton & Cadwell Mfg. Co 41 

Canada Metal Co Inside Front Cover 

Canadian Tube & Steel Products ... 44 

Canadian Veneering Co., Inc 41 

Canadian Potteries, Ltd 1 

Chicago Pump Company 39 

Crane, Limited 6 

Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., W. H. . . . 10 

Dart Union Co., Ltd. . .Inside Back Cover 

Empire Brass Mfg. Co. 

Outside Front Cover 

Farrell, J. E 7 

Forwell Foundry, Ltd 7 

Gait Brass Co Outside Back Cover 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp 35 

Griffith, T. G. & Company 3 

Healey-Ruff Co 7 

Jardine & Co., A. B 10 

Katie Foundry Co 44 

Kerr Eng. Co., Ltd. . 37 

Lord & Burnham Co 7 

Martin, H. P. & Sons 44 

Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., H. . 22-23 

Smart Turner Machine Co 40 

St. Louis Technical Institute 42 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co 2- 

Steel Trough & Machine Co 44 

Toronto Hardware Mfg. Co., Ltd . . 41 

Wallaceburg Brass & Iron Mfg. Co., 

Ltd 37 

Want Ad. Page : 42 

Warden King, Ltd 8 

Williams & Co., J. H 39 

Wolverine, Limited 43 



Simplex Cast Iron 

Traps 
Built for Service 




Perfect 
Castings 
Machined 
Perfect 



No. 282 

Made in two sizes 1 Vi" and 1 V2 



Self - Scouring Adjustable 
Non-Syphoning 

Others may look the same but? 




Boiler Drain Cocks 




Full Waterway 
Heavy Body 
Raised Seat 
Red Fibre Seat 
Washer and Bonnet 
Packing 

Wolverine Guarantee 



No. 6B7R 



It pays to have Wolverine Articles on hand for 
instant use 

ORDER NOW 



44 



San.tary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter February 15, 1923 



l^l illlllillillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilill ^ 



BEAVER BRAND 

Porcelain Enamel Ware 

Your Guarantee of Quality 

Beaver Brand Enamelware by its ability to meet the 
highest demands for service under all conditions, 
has established itself in the confidence of the public 
to such an extent that each month witnesses an ever- 
increasing demand for products of Beaver manufac- 
ture. 

Amherst Foundry Co., Limited 

General Offices and Factory : Amherst, N.S. 



AGENTS: 



Ontario : 
MONARCH BRASS MFG. CO. 
71 Brown St., Toronto 



Manitoba and Northwest: 

E. B. PLEWES 
197 Princess St., Winnipeg 




Easier to attach 
More permanent 



Cost less 



Tapped Closet Bend 




WROUGHT PIPE 

Suitable for the approaching period of 
building activity, road construction, etc. 
Mrfv^^ This is a line of great importance in 
■ \ making successful, profitable contracts . 

^A/yT Our C. T. Brand of Wrought Pipe has 
been 

THOROUGHLY INSPECTED 

by practical, experienced men. It is tested to 600 
lbs. hydraulic pressure, and branded with our trade- 
mark. We carry this line of reliable pipe in size? 
Vfe-in. to 4-in. Black or Galvanized. We also manu- 
facture nipples and couplings, black and galvanized, 
in all sizes. 

Ask your Jobber for C. T. Brand Wrought Pipe 

Canadian Tube and Steel Products Co., Ltd. 

Operating Canadian Tube and Iron Co., Limited 
Works at Lachine Canal, Montreal 




NO. I -TWEED" 
Sanitary Closet with mahogany fin- 
ished seat and lid with nickel-plated 
hinges. 

The special "Tweed chemical used 
in connection with the closet, de- 
stroys every trace of odor. Easily 
installed, as no plumbing required. 



Out -of -Town Business 

Only those who have, to live the year 
around in a locality without city 
conveniences realize the hardships in- 
volved, anil it is among these that 
you can do a profitable business with 

"TWEED" 
SANITARY CLOSET 

A city .convenience at a fraction of 
the cost — anybody can afford one. 
Compactly packed for shipment and 
easily handled. 

We also make an attractive line of 
■Tweed" Baths and other home 

conveniences. 
Write for price lists and literature. 
Meel Trough & Machine Co., Ltd. 
TWEED. ONT., CANADA 

G. M. PRICE, 
10 Victoria St., Montreal. 
Quebec and Eastern Representative 




The Martin Portable 
Vise Stand 

light in weight — 
only fifty pounds 

Can be carried anywhere with- 
out inconvenience. 

Put up in two seconds; no bolts, screws or 
fastenings needed. 

Use the Martin Portable Vise Stand where 
pipe or conduit must be bent, cut or threaded. 
10 days free trial. 

If your jobber can't supply you — write us. 

H. P. MARTIN & SONS 

803 W. 12th Street OWENSBORO, KY- 

CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVE : — L. F. Mayne, 875 Trafalgar 
Street, London, Ontario. 




Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



Dart Union Pipe Couplings are 

& (Both Face and Seat) (J 



This feature prevents deterioration at the 
vital point, and is the Reason Why 

DART UNIONS 
STAY TIGHT 

— permanently 

Dart Unions are really Economical and 
Troubleproof. Have you tried them ? 

Sold by all Jobbers. 

Dart Union Co., Limited, Toronto, Ont. 




A Permanent Job 

When installing plumbing or fittings make your job permanent — with Rawlplugs. 

You can save time and know the job is done right when you use Rawlplugs, be- 
cause the screws will never fall out and there is no waste of labor. Rawlplugs 
hold screws securely in brick, concrete, cement, hollow tile, bath-room tiles, slate or 
any other material. 

Contractors who take part in the construction of a building should see that these 
fibre plugs are used with every screw. They are cheaper, neater and stronger. 
Positively the best device for securing screws that has ever been used. 

Write to us to-day for more interesting information, samples and price list. 

INVENTIONS LIMITED 

Sole Agents for 

THE RAWLPLUG CO.. OF CANADA— Southam Bldg, Bleury St., Mon real. 



Sales Agents for Ontario: 
DOMINION ENGINEERING 

AGENCY, LTD., 
24 Adelaide St. E., Toronto. 

Sales Agents for Manitoba: 
STERLING SPECIALTIES 
213 Somerset Building. Win- 
nipeg, Man. 




Sales Agents for Nova 
Scot'a and Prince 
Edward Island: 
BLACKADAR & STEVENS. 
139 Roy Building, Halifax, 
Nova Scotia. 

Agents wanted in Ottawa, 
Vancouver. St. John, N.B., 
and Halifax, N.S. 




Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



3 




v 



Perfection 



Here is a closet tank that is beautiful and attractive 
enough, externally, to satisfy the most fastidious pur- 
chaser, and yet is so perfect inwardly, mechanically, that 
every plumber knows it will give the most satisfaction 
for the greatest length of time for the least expenditure 
of money. 

That both the trade and the public are appreciative of 
this rare combination of beauty and mechanical ex- 
cellence is proved by the fact that the New Design Vitro 
Tank has the greatest sale of any tank in Canada. 



Gait Brass Company, Limited 



Your Jobber Sells Them 



GALT 



ONTARIO 






Plumber and STeam fitter of Canada 



Vol. XVII. 



PUBLICATION OFFICE, TORONTO, MARCH I, 1923 



No. 5 




The Acme of Refinement 

The bathroom of the finest mansion or the modest cottage 
gets its final touch of beauty in this new "Emco" White 
Tank. 

The bright snowy whiteness of our guaranteed composi- 
tion will not stain or discolor. The surface of glassy 
smoothness is easily kept immaculate with a damp cloth. 
"Emco" beauty in the open is matched by "Emco" effic- 
iency in the hidden equipment. 

Ask Your Jobber 

Empire Brass Mfg. Co. Limited 

London and Toronto, Canada 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



Plumbers! 

Pussyfoot 
Tanks 

are exceptionally cheap for present 
booking. 

Many Jobbers have taken advantage 
of the prevailing low prices, and 

"Pussyfoot" Closet Tanks 





Pussyfoot 

SIMPLEX VALVE 

are the Best value any Plumber can buy. 

DEMAND these from your Jobber and get 
the benefit of the highest Efficiency and 
greatest Value in your Tank requirements. 

Guaranteed in Every Way 
Buy from Your Jobber 



THE CANADA METAL COMPANY 

LIMITED 



Montreal Hamilton TORONTO Winnipeg Vancouver 



March 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



i 



No. 10-A 



The M> /„ 

C»,V • '"or 



JSiit 

m 
W 



"Genuine' 



New York Office 
and Warehous e— 
234 Water Street 



Perfection 
Line 



Originators of the Genuine 
No. 10 and 10A Plates 
Your Jobber can supply you 



2 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 1, 1923 



"A Quality Product" 

Anthes Soil Pipe 

When it is a "particular" job ; when you do a piece of work for 
a man who wants "the best you've got" — use Anthes Soil Pipe. 

For that matter use Anthes Soil Pipe for every job. It costs no 
more than inferior pipe, wears longer, gives infinitely better ser- 
vice and brings you in a generous measure that goodwill upon 
which successful business is built. 




Immediate shipments from stock at Toronto or Winnipeg 



Anthes Foundry 

Limited 

Toronto Winnipeg 

Manufacturers of Cast Iron Soil Pipe and Fittings 



March 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



3 



R P. BLAKEY. 

Provincial Architect 

Jas. Ballantine Co. Ltd. 

Heating & Plumbing 
Contractor 




CRANE 

Plumbing and Heating Equipment 

Embracing practically everything needed 
for heating, plumbing, and sanitation for 
buildings of all kinds 

CRANE SERVICE 

enables the architect to safeguard his 
clients with uniform quality obtained 
through one central source of supply. 



Manufacturers of Valves, Fittings and Piping Equipment and Distributors 
of Pipe, Plumbing and Heating Supplies, 



CR A N E 

HEAD OFFICE & EXHIBIT ROOMS: 386 BEAVER HALL SQUARE, MONTREAL 
WORKS: 1280 ST. PATRICK ST., MONTREAL 

Branches and Warehouses Halifax, Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, London, 
Winnipeg, Regina, Calgary, Vancouver . Sales Offices: St. John, N.B., 
Quebec, Sherbrook.e, Edmonton and Victoria. Sydney, Australia. 



Crane-Bennett, Ltd. Head Office and Warehouse, 
London, England. Sales Offices: Birmingham. 
- C.ardiff. Glasgow, Leeds, Manchester, - 




4? 



Crane Hydraulic Globe Vale* 



4 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 1, 1S23 





The Result of Guessing at Prices 



75% of the failures in the plumbing and heating 
business are caused by prices being too low. 



We Guarantee 
your profits 



Years of actual experience in the Plumbing and Heating busi- 
ness fits us to compile suggested selling: prices. Whether it be a 
Vs plug or a bath tub we absolutely guarantee you a reasonable 
profit. Our system has saved many a Sanitary Engineer from 
bankruptcy during the past 5 years. 

Here's How 

We furnish you with a large leather covered loose leaf book 
containing suggested selling prices on over 3,000 items. No 
matter how often prices change it's our business to keep your 
book up-to-date and we have 4 people in our office who do nothing 
else but watch your profits. You should try out this Service for a 
year but if you are skeptical, send and get our booklet. It's in- 
teresting. 




Get This 
Book Free > 



I 

Henderson Business Service, Ltd., 

Box 123, Brantford, Ont. 

Send us your booklet "Profit Insurance" without obligation. 




Name . . 
Address 



Henderson Business Service Ltd. 

Specialists 
Box 123 Brantford 

Brant Farmers Bldg. 



6 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 1, 1923 



Tubular Plumbing Goods 



We Manufacture 




No. 4350 
Waste and Overflow 



and can supply from stock: 

Waste and Overflows: 

Adjustable horizontally and vertically. 

Adjustable P. and S. Traps: 

Plain and Vented. 

Deep Seal Traps: 

Sink and P.O. Plug. 



All Traps and Waste and Overflows 
supplied in 19 Imp. Ga. Tubing. 



Lavatory Supplies: 

Wall and Floor. 

Bath Supplies: 

With Ell or one piece offset. 

Tank Supplies: 

Plain or with Stop. 



All Supply Pipes furnished in Iron Pipe 
size and weight. 



Attractive designs — Prime material — 
Superior finish. 



Ask your Jobber. 




No. 4301 
Deep Seal Trap 



The Wallaceburg Brass & Iron Manufacturing Co., Limited 

WALLACEBURG, ONTARIO 



TORONTO OFFICE: 

10 Wellington St. E., Phone Main 2355. 
Mr. L. N. Van stone. 



MONTREAL OFFICE: 

10 Victoria St., Phone Uptown 945. 
Mr. G. M. Price. 



WINNIPEG: 
Moncrieff & Endress, Ltd., Gait B!dg.. 
Telephone: A. 9135. 



March 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



7 



Your Own Salesmanship 
Is Not Enough 



The testimony of satisfied owners- 
owners of boilers and radiators that you 
have installed, is necessary to the up- 
building of a successful heating busi- 



ness. 



The average Canadian wants, and de- 
mands from his heating plant adequate 
heat — and wants it at a minimum of 
trouble and of fuel consumption. 




Daisy Boilers and Viking Radiators al- 
ways, unfailingly, give just this service ; 
they build good will for the dealer; they 
enhance his reputation; they are his 
surest salesman. 

Spring Home-Builders are alive to the 
necessity for reliable heating systems. 
Estimates are being furnished and plans 
being made — now. Your golden op- 
portunity is at hand to recommend, sell, 
and instal "Daisy Boilers" and "Viking 
Radiators." We are ready to go over 
specifications with you. 



WARDEN KING LIMITED 

MONTREAL 
Branch Office: 136 Simcoe St., Toronto 




8 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 1, 1923 




Cast iron or steel shells; seamless drawn 
copper tubes. "Out of Service" periods 
are few and far between where National 
"U" Bend Heaters are installed. The ease 
with which the heating element may be 
removed, for cleaning or repair, is ap- 




STORAGE HEATERS 



Years of Experience in the De- 
sign and Construction of Feed 
Water and Storage Heaters ex- 
plains in part the preference 
so many engineers show for 
heaters that bear the National 
name. 

preciated by owner and engineer alike. 

National "U" Bend Storage Heaters assure 
a hot water supply whenever you want it. 
They use live or exhaust steam, and heat 
either continuously or intermittently. 



Canadian Representatives 

Grant E. Cole Company 

21-23 River St. - Toronto, Ontario 

Representatives in the leading cities of Canada. 



We have found the Perfect Burner 

The Seymour Oil Burner 

To-day the using of oil fuel for domestic heating has passed the experimental stage; it 
is a thoroughly proven success — with the right type of burner. 

We have been carefully watching this new development in the heating field, and two years 
ago we began to examine and test various types of burners. 

We examined 22 different oil burners and each was unsatisfactory. Then we found it — 
the perfect burner. It had been made in Toronto for over three years. 

THE SEYMOUR BURNER 
Prominent engineers and professors from the University of Toronto were called upon to 
make tests; investigators interviewed every user — some of the burners had been in use 
three years. The burner passed every test with flying colors and every user was more 
than satisfied with the service he was getting. 

We took over the manufacture of the Seymour Burner and have sold it all over Canada. 
Every dealer has re-ordered. 

Mr. E. H. Jewett, president of this company, is a founder and director of the Page and 
Jewett automobile companies. Jealous for his business reputation, only the highest quality 
merchandise is manufactured in our plant. 

The Jewett reputation and a Million Dollar Company guarantee the worth of the Seymour 
Oil Burner. 

The Price is Reasonable. For further information write: 

GENERAL NECESSITIES CORPORATION 

SALES AGENTS FOR 

Jewett Radio — Phonographs, Ltd. 

Walkerville - - Ontario 



March 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



9 




USE 

TESTED Soil Pipe 

IT COSTS NO MORE AND YOU KNOW THE JOB IS RIGHT 

Manufactured by 

FORWELL FOUNDRY, LTD. 

KITCHENER, ONT. 




Farrfhern Atmospheric 

Steam Heating Systems 

Farrfhern Systems effect large savings in coal bills, 
frequently from 10 to 25%. They are much less 
expensive to instal than vacuum or other heating 
systems. You do away with Radiator Traps and 
Air Valves and a lot of unnecessary fittings, also 
complicated protective devices used on other 
systems. 

Whether steam is from an individual boiler, high 
pressure plant, or exhaust steam, the Farrfhern 
System of Atmospheric Heating is the most eco- 
nomical and satisfactory. 

Send us the plans of your next prospect, and submit 
a Farrfhern proposal. 

J.E.Farrell - Sales Engineer 

210 Galley Ave. Toronto 




No Other Die Stock Like It 

No. 6 Beaverette 



Threads 

Vi to 





Instantly 
Adjustable 



No Loose Parts 

No. 6 Beaverette cuts perfect threads 
on Vi, %, V2 and %" with greatest 
ease, speed and convenience. 

No loose parts— instantly adjustable— simply 
set the handle. Universal chuck avoids 
bushing. Cuts a thread while changing 
dies on other tools. Always ready to use 
when needed. 100,000 in daily use in 
leading shops the world over. 

Write for the Beaver catalog — the most 
complete pipe tool catalog issued. 

THE BORDEN COMPANY 

518 Dana Ave., Warren, 0. 



REAVER 

The Easiest Way To Cut Good Threads* 




TRY IT! The E-Z Radiator Hanger 

You'll only have to try it once because it always works satisfactorily and 
there is a demand for more all the time. 

It hangs radiators securely and is a real device to give a neat and complete 
finish to the interior of every home. 

The E. Z. Radiator Hanger has one Bolt, Invisible Washer, Horizontal 
Adjustment. Vertical Adjustment, Baseboard Adjustment. 
Made for Wall and Column Radiators. 

IMMEDIATE SHIPMENTS FROM LARGE STOCKS 




MADE IN CANADA 



HEALY-RUFF CO. 



J. H. Leonard. Tribune Bldg.. Winnipeg. 

D. G. Brison, Standard Bank Building 
Vancouver. 

A. Walker, 514 McLean Bldg.. Calgarv, 

E. T. Flanigan. 229 College St.. Tor- 
onto. 



MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Eager Coombs & Co., Ltd. Halifax, 

Can. 

Shaver Bros., Booth Bldg., Ottawa. 

S. T. Had ley, 304 University St. 
Montreal. 




"Style R." 



! 



LO 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 1, 1923 | 




Are You Lying Down 
on the Job^ 



Only a plumber's very best endeavors will bring him success in these days of 
keen competition. He must not only know the practical and technical end of 
his business, have a capacity for hard work, and a shrewd grasp of salesman- 
ship, but he must also know his markets — where to buy to best advantage. 

The plumber who through carelessness or neglect fails in any of these import- 
ant matters is lying down on the job. 

There is no excuse for a plumber being uncertain or ignorant of prices in his 
field. With an Allpriser on his desk and the Allpriser service, he takes the 
guess out of estimates and substitutes accuracy — the cost is negligible. 

Write Today 

K. B. ALLISON 

4 Irwin Avenue - Toronto, Ont. 



steam heating SiTHo^L 





Dunham Pack- 
less Radiator 
Valve. 



Users of Dun- 
ham Heating 
often remark, 
"Zero or be- 
low has caused 
us to appre- 
ciate still more 
our Dunham 
System." 



Dunham 
tor 



Radia 
Trap. 



DUNHAM 

^^^m REG TRADE -M»OK 

■^HEATING SERVICE 

(Made in Canada) 



THE merits of Dunham Steam Heating in large 
buildings have been universally recognized. Con- 
tractors recommending and installing Dunham Steam 
Heat in homes do so because it provides the same 
characteristic services: 

Simplicity in operation. Quick response to changes 
in outside temperature. Individual radiator control 
with Dunham Packless Valve, which admits as much 
or as little heat as required. Freedom of circula- 
tion through each and every radiator, insured by 
the Dunham Radiator Trap, attached as an outlet 
on the radiator. No noise; no cold radiators. Ideal 
heat in spring and fall, when only a little fire is 
required and unsurpassed efficiency in bitter cold 
weather. 

'Phone or write any Dunham office for information 
or assistance in putting your Dunham Steam System 
proposal before your customers. 

C. A. Dunham Co., Limited 

TORONTO - ONTARIO 

Manufacturers of a popular line of Heating Specialties. 

Halifax Vancouver Winnipeg Ottawa Montreal Calgary 
London: 18 St. Thomas St., S. E. 1 



March 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



11 



SANITARY ENGINEER 

PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER OF CANADA 

ESTABLISHED 1907 PUBLISHED TWICE MONTHLY 

Vol. XVII PUBLICATION OFFICE : TORONTO, MARCH 1, 1928 No. 5 



CONTENTS 

First Installation Hardest to Get . 13 

Plumbers Discuss Raising of Standards — The Luxury of a Bath in 

Constantinople 14 

Using the Windows for Merchandising Plumbing and Heating 

Goods 15 

Plumbing, Heating and Ventilating Installation in New Mount 
Royal Hotel, Montreal 16-22 

Giving Preference in Heating Systems 23 

Tinsmith Series of Patterns 25 

Editorial Comment 26 

Minute Message by Frank Stockdale 27 

Further Progress by Jerry in Selling Old Sigh Low a Compleat 

Bathroom Job 28 

News Notes From Coast to Coast 30 

Market Conditions and Tendencies 32-38 



The MacLean Publishing Company, Ltd. 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN, President. H. T. HUNTER, Vice-President. 

H. V. TYRRELL, General Manager. 

Publishers of Sanitary Engineer, Hardware and Metal. The Financial Post, MacLean's Magazine, 
Canadian Grocer, (Dry Goods Review, Men's Wear Review, Canadian Printer and Publisher, 
Bookseller and Stationer, Canadian Machinery and Manufacturing (News, Power House, Canadian 
Foundryman. Canadian Shipping and Marine Engineering News. Canadian Automotive Trade 

Journal, Druggists' Weekly. 
Cable Address : Macpubeo, Toronto : Atabek, London, Eng. 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter of Canada 

Published on the First and Fifteenth of Each Month 

Office of Publication: 143-153 University Avenue, Toronto, Canada. 
GEO. D. DAVIS. Manager. 

H. L. SOUTHALL. Managing Editor. N. A. KEARNS, Contributing Editor. 

F. R. McKINLEY, Associate Editor O. W. KOTHE. Contributing Editor. 

O. T. MARTIN, Associate Editor. EDWIN NEWSOME, Technical Editor. 

CHIEF OFFICES 

CANADA— Montreal, Southam Bldg.. 128 Bleury St., Phone Plateau 946. Toronto, 143-153 University Ave, Tele- 
phone Adel. 5740 ; Winnipeg, 810 Confederation Life Bldg., Telephone A. 3773. 

GREAT BRITAIN— London, The MacLean Company of Great Britain, Limited, 88 Fleet Street, E.C.. E. J. Dodd, 
Director, Telephone Central 12960. Cable Address : Atabek, London, England. 

UNITED STATES — New York L. H. Meyer, 1606 St. James Bldg.. 1133 Broadway, Telephone Watkins 5868 ; 
Boston, C. L. Morton, Room 734, Old South Buildings, Telephone Main 1024; Chicago, 405-6 Transportation 
Bldg., 608 So. Dearborn St.. Wabash 9430. 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE— Canada, £2.00 a year; Great Britain. South Africa, and West Indies, 8s. 6d. a year; 
United States, $2.50 a year; other countries. $3.00 a year. Single copies, 10 cents. Invariably in advance. 



12 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 1, 1923 





More Work and Better Work 

with 

Toledo and Jardine 
Pipe Threading Tools 

This tool threads pipe with less labor than others. It is 
so simple in construction that it is easier to do work 
right than to do it wrong. It is compact, light in weight, 
strong and durable, accurate and speedy. It costs no 
more than imitations and in one month's production it 
will more than pay for itself. 

Ask the man that uses them. 

Made in Canada — Leading Supply Houses will quote you. 

A. B. Jardine & Co., Limited, Hespeler, Ontario 



No. 2 Toledo Geared Threading 
Tool. Capacity 2%" to 4". 

One Man Does the 
Work of Two 



Ontario. West of Broekville: 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill. 
269 Richmond St. W.. Toronto. Ont. 



Broekville and East: 

J. R. Devereaux & Co., 
New Kirks Bldg.. Montreal, C 



Winnipeg and West : 

Stanley Brock, Ltd.. Winnipeg. Man. 
Calgary, Alta., Vancouver, B.C. 



SIGN AND MAIL THIS COUPON AND GET A CATALOGUE 



Address 



, Sanitary Engineer , 



Most Plumbers Prefer It 
Hercules Solvent 

No Fumes 



Hercules Drain Pipe Solvent works fast. It 
works surely too and with less expenditure of 
solvent materials — n wonder it is the best 
selling solvent on the market. 

If you have never tested out Hercules Solvent 
you are overlooking- a good bet. Hercules 
costs no more , and is exclusively the Sanitary 
Engineer's specialty. 

Some Jobbers have it. We always have a 
stock. 




ABSOLUTELY 
No Portland Cement in 
C. & H. Pipe Joint Cement 



C. & H. Pipe Joint Cement is guaranteed not to 
contain any particle of Portland Cement. One 
pound will do the work of three pounds of red 
lead and do it far better. 

Our sales are increasing rapidly — there is a rea- 
son and the reason is QUALITY. 

You may be able to buy something cheaper per 
pound but C. & H. goes farther and is actually a 
big money-saver for you. 

If you have not used C. & H. Cement we will 
guarantee to please you. 



W. H. CUNNINGHAM & HILL, LIMITED 

We Have Everything in Specialties 




r o R 



PIPE JOINTCtf 

XON-UAK CEMENT 
Cl^M.WATEB&a* 5 ' 



Established 
1907 

Circulates 
Throughout 
Canada 



Plumber and Steam filler of Canada 



Published 
First 
and 
Fifteenth 
of Month 



VOL. XVII. 



TORONTO, MARCH 1, L923 



NO. 5 



First Installation Hardest to Get 

Garth Company, Ottawa, Talk Winter Conditions Hard and 
Long to Farmer Prospects for Water and Sewage Systems- 
Farmer Will Buy Automobile in Hurry But Hesitates Over 

Sanitary Conveniences 



SELLING the farmer on the idea 
of water systems and sewage dis- 
posal systems is no mean task, 
but like every other business proposi- 
tion, there are ways and means of land- 
ing your prospect. Some very telling 
methods along this line have been adopt- 
ed by the Ottawa branch of the Garth 
Company of Montreal, as outlined to 
Sanitary Engineer by T. E. McGrail, 
branch manager. 

This company has been successful in 
the immediate past in putting across the 
idea of steel septic tanks in conditions 
where water difficulties threaten and 
where it is necessary to eliminate the 
possibility of heaving on account of 
clay. This system has been sold largely 
on the strength of its money saving pos- 
sibilities. The farmer has been brought 
to realize that it is a cheaper proposi- 
tion than others, because no concrete 
work is necessary. 

Mr. McGrail pointed out that these 
tanks were being made in steel, adapt- 
able to any condition, and in such a 
manner that they could be installed in 
basements of buildings. This was prov- 
ing quite a feature, and it was the in- 
tention of his company to boost it as 
much as possible in rural communities. 

House Canvass 

When it came to a discussion of the 
methods of getting prospects, Mr. Mc- 
Grail very emphatically stated that he 
favored the house-to-house canvass in 
preference to any other idea which 
might be carried out. 

He did not think there was a great 
deal to be accomplished by sending cir- 
culars or letters. It was much more 
satisfactory for the contractor or trader 
to sit down with the farmer in his own 
house and tell him in the most convinc- 
ing manner how he was going to bene- 
fit by the installation of modern sani- 
tary improvements. 

"I have found," said Mr. McGrail, 
"that if you talk winter conditions hard 
and long enough to the average farmer, 
you will win him over. A discussion of 
the danger of outside privies especial- 
ly to his children will at first, in most 



case's be met with the rejoinder: 'Well, 
what has been good enough for me is 
surely good enough for my children.' 
But I have found that the self-same 
farmer can be sold on the strength of 
examples of young people who are con- 
stantly leaving their rural homes for 
life in the city where sanitary condi- 
tions are more agreeable and healthful. 

Doesn't Hesitate to Buy Car 

"Very often you can 'get' your farmer 
prospect by drawing comparisons. And 
one comparison which will set him 
thinking is that he does not hesitate to 
spend a thousand dollars on an automo- 
bile, whereas for an outlay of less than 
half that amount he could have modern 
sanitary conveniences installed in his 
home. Where you find a farmer putting 
up a good building to replace the old 
home you have a chance of a lifetime 




Show farmer danger to his 
family of outside privies. 



to sell him, and he can usually be sold 
on the argument that his new home will 
lack a great deal to make it up-to-date, 
through the absence of modern sanitary 
improvements. 

Land the First One 

"In districts where people live fairly 
close together, the big thing is to land 
the first installation, the remainder will 
come easier. That has been our exper- 
ience. There is a great deal of pride 
among farmers and where they live 
close together one fellow is not over- 
joyed at seeing his neighbor get some- 
thing he has not got." 

Mr. McGrail when asked what he 
thought of the idea of trying to influ- 
ence the farmers through the agency of 
the county council replied that he did 
not place much faith in this method for 
the simple reason that members of 
county councils, were as a rule the most 
difficult class of people to sell. "And 
if you cannot sell the councillor him- 
self, there is little use in spending time 
trying to get him to influence others," 
he said. 

Give Immediate Estimate 

Speaking from the experience he had 
gained while representing the T. G. 
Griffith Company of Toronto, Mr. Mc- 
Grail laid emphasis upon the necessity 
of giving the farmer an immediate 
estimate on the job. He always asked 
for it. Therefore it was essential that 
whoever went after the job, whether it 
be the manufacturer, the trader or the 
contractor, he should have a combined 
knowledge of estimating, installation, 
and the principles of water supply and 
sewage disposal. A good man, Mr. Mc- 
Grail thought, should have little diffi- 
culty in giving an estimate on the spot. 

Other plumbers with much experience 
in rural business have also told of the 
necessity of giving careful estimates to 
farmers. In view of the approach of the 
season when farmers will appreciate the 
value of farm sanitary equipment, now 
is a good time to figure on putting these 
suggestions into practice. 



14 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 1, 1923 



Plumbers Discuss Raising of Standards 

Committee Appointed to Draw Up Amendments 
to Existing Plumbing By-laws of York Township 
— Value of the Plumbing Trade Paper 



THE York Township Master Plumb- 
bers' Association held their month- 
ly meeting, followed by a repast, 
at Hunt's Limited, Yonge St., Toronto, 
on Wednesday evening. 

Under the able direction of President 
MacDonald and Secretary Garrick, the 
meeting got away to a good start, and 
after regular routine business had been 
dealt with, a lengthy and thorough dis- 
cussion under the heading of "Raising 
the Standard of Work," took place. 

Reeve W. S. Jury, known to the trade 
through his many years' connection with 
the Gurney Foundry Co. and Crane 
Limited, showed in his interesting ad- 
dress that a vast amount of time had 
been given by him toward the general 
improvement of conditions in the Town- 
ship, and particularly toward making 



the class of work done by the craft as 
safe and sane as possible for the pub- 
lic good. 

He made a spirited appeal for sound 
plumbing by-laws and advocated rigid 
and impartial enforcement. 

That his views expressed the con- 
sensus of opinion of the majority pre- 
sent was shown by the general spirit 
of the meeting. 

Harry W. Rushby and John McCand- 
lish particularly stressed the idea that 
by-laws and their enforcement must be 
primarily for the protection of the pub- 
lic, and with this end in view the meet- 
ing approved a motion, giving a com- 
mittee under the chairmanship of Mr. 
Rushby, power to draw up proposed 
amendments to the existing by-laws in 



York Township. These will be discus- 
sed at the next meeting in detail. 

This was followed by a splendid edu- 
cational talk by Kenneth B. Allison, 
whose illuminating and convincing ar- 
guments in which the subject of over- 
head was dealt with very fully and 
clearly. 

Mr. Allison made reference to the 
value of the trade paper in collecting 
and passing on news and technical in- 
formation of value to the craft, and 
made particular reference to ' Sani- 
tary Engineer, as being the only 
paper of its kind in Canada. The ap- 
plause which Mr. Allison received upon 
finishing his address indicated in a very 
striking way the attitude of members 
present. 




Following items dealing: with develop- 
ments in the plumbing and heating field in 
Canada in 1903 are reproduced from the 
trade paper files of the MacLean Publish- 
ing Company: 



"An excellent sewerage system has been 
installed in Amherst, N.S., and plumbers 
are very busy." 



Where a Bath is a Rare Luxury 





"Purdy, Mansell & Co., Toronto, have 
the contract for hot water heating for 
the R. C. Presbvter'v, Penetanguishene, 
Ont." 



"It is rumored a new hotel will be built 
in Montreal this summer, to be called the 
Grand Central and to be built on Victoria 
Square." 



"Toronto journeymen plumbers will hold 
their annual At Home in the Temple Bldg. 
on Friday evening. President J. A. Drogan 
is chairman." 



"The trouble between Lemmon, Claxton 
& Lawrenson and the Plumbers and Sheet 
Metal Workers' Union at Kingston, Ont., 
has been amicablv settled." 



"Permits issued for building in Toronto 
total $3,834,923 against $3,568,883 in 1901 
when the permit for the $1,000,000 King 
Edward Hotel was taken out," 




Here are shown two burden bearers in the city of Constantinople, the city where 
much hardship has been experienced as result of the varying fortunes of war. 
This mode of transportation would hardly be in keeping with the Canadian 
plumbers' ideas of profitable business and turnover would be pretty small in 
proportion to costs if it were done this way in this country. Someone is- soon to 
have a new bath tub, which is a rare luxury in Constantinople. The style of 
the bath is not altogether unlike some of those found in this country. 



"At the last meeting of the Plumbers' 
Supply Association, the following resolu^ 
tion was passed: 'Resolved, that each mem- 
ber notify all his travellers, agents, etc., 
that associational prices are now firmly 
enforced and must be rigidly adhered to.'" 



"It often happens that the droppings 
from a nickel-plated pipe or from a brass 
pipe, stain an enamelled bath. It is not easy 
to clean stains from enamelled ware but 
in this instance it will be found that a 
complete polish can be obtained with ox- 
ide of tin which does not destroy the 
enamel." 



March 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



15 



Merchandising Plumbing Goods Through the 
Best Use of Window Displays 

Standard Plumbing and Heating Co., of Winnipeg, Man., Find 
Windows Big Help in Selling Small Bathroom Accessories and 
Bringing Prospects for Heavier Equipment — Selling the Western 
Farmer on Quality Plumbing and Heating Goods 




Window displays are an important factor in the success of the Standard Plumbing & Healing Co., Ltd., of Winni- 
peg, Man., in the merchandising of plumbing and heating equipment of all classes from small bathroom accessories to 
large installations. The windows dressed as illustrated created quite a sensation, the Christmas tree idea, as suggested 
in Sanitary Engineer in December last, being quite a sensation. Sales of lines displayed were in fair volume but the 
chief advantage was the list of prospects secured for follow-up work. 



A SURVEY of the plumbing field 
in Canada, recently made by one 
interested in this field, brought 
home very forcibly the impression that 
the progressive plumbers who were get- 
ting the business and not talking of 
hard times were ones who, among other 
things, were making best use of their 
window displays to merchandise plumb- 
ing equipment. The idea of varying the 
display according to seasons and sub- 
jects has been used by a number of 
plumbers, and the Christmas tree idea 
as suggested in an issue of Sanitary 
Engineer last December was very wide- 
ly used with good effect. . 

One of the plumbing firms which has 
great faith in the value of the windows 
is the Standard Plumbing and Heating 
Co. Ltd., of Winnipeg. In the accom- 
panying illustration are to be seen two 
broad windows and two windows at the 
door entrance, all dressed attractively 
with plumbing and heating equipment 
and kindred lines. On the right is seen 
a built-in type of bath, shower, and a 
group of small bathroom, accessories 
grouped around the tree. In one of the 
small windows is seen a pedestal lava- 
tory; coffee urn, mirrors, etc. In the 



opposite window a sink, closet seat's, 
etc., are arranged. The broad window 
on the left contains a grouping of elec- 
trical lines showing electric water 
heater connected up to range boiler, 
electrical grate, vacuum cleaner, range, 
etc. This latter business is conducted 
in conjunction with a firm of electri- 
cians. 

This firm is located at 290 Graham 
Ave., Winnipeg, and is under the direc- 
tion of Joseph Turner. Discussing 
plumbing and heating matters with Mr. 
Turner, it was pointed out to Sanitary 
Engineer that sales of high quality 



equipment to Westerners, particularly 
farmers, were made by the use of the 
argument that the average Westerner 
insisted upon having the best grade of 
tools and implements for harvesting, 
and that they should see to it that their 
household was equipped with modern 
sanitary fixtures. The idea of giving 
the farm housewife an even break on 
the deal is also stressed. 

In the City of Winnipeg, this firm 
does considerable contracting business 
and large installations, such as hotels, 
restaurants, etc. 



Householders First on List for Gas 



A COPY of the latest regulations 
made by the minister of mines un- 
der the Natural Gas Conservation 
Act of 1921, has been received. 

The regulations, as issued for the year 
1922, first designate the consumers to 
whom natural gas may be supplied. 
Householders have preference over all 
other users. The use of the gas for cook- 
ing meals anywhere comes second, the 
heating of dwelling houses third. A long- 



list of classes of structures which may 
also burn gas for heating follows. 

New consumers may be supplied where 
the property to be supplied abuts upon 
the present mains and can be reached 
by private service lines from the said 
mains. Further limitations are placed 
on the use for heating purposes in the 
following clause: 

"In the foregoing classifications the 
heating equipment for which gas may 
(Continued on page 38) 



16 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 1, 1923 



Sanitary and Heating Equipment 
of World's 



Largest 
Hotel 



Mount Royal Hotel Costing 
$7,000,000 Has Interesting Ven- 
tilating, Heating and Refriger- 
ating System 

By J. G. SOUCY 




DURING the last 10 years there has been felt a growing 
need for additional hotel accommodation in Montreal, 
designed not only to meet the needs of the travelling 
men and the ever-increasing number of tourists, but to 
meet the growing demand for better and larger accommoda- 
tion for general conferences and international conventions. 
The Mount Royal, with its many beautiful and convenient ap- 
pointments, was the logical outcome of such an unmistakable 
demand. The hotel is under the direction of the United Hotels 
Company of America. 

Much could be written about the commercial importance of 
this enterprise from both a national and an international 
aspect, but the outstanding purpose of this article is to des- 
cribe features of the plant equipment, which are of particular 
interest to our readers. 

The hotel has a most convenient location, just one block 
north of the busy corner of St. Catherine and Peel Sts. The main 
entrance is on the east side of Peel St. It is in the heart 
of Montreal's busy shopping district and convenient to all 
theatres, railroad depots and boat landings. 

Just north of it is Mount Royal and to the south flows the 
majestic St. Lawrence, with its important shipping facilities. 
To the east are to be seen large industrial centres, here and 
there studded with churches and office buildings. A little 
to the south, is the great financial centre, while to the west 
are fine residential districts. 

The Finished Undertaking and General Plan 

Some idea of the magnitude of the undertaking may be 
gained from the fact that the building is 130 feet high, oc- 
cupies a space 306 ft. long by 227 ft. wide, or an area of 70,- 
000 sq. ft., weighs approximately 150,000 tons; it has cost 
more than .$7,000,000 to build and required over one year to 
complete. There have been more than 1,500 men employed 
directly on the site, which included laborers, mechanics and 
artists; besides a large staff of expert architects, accountants, 



draftsmen, mechanical and electrical engineers, superintend- 
ents, supervisors and inspectors. 

Away from the site, hundreds of workmen were provided 
employment in quarries and forests, brick-kilns, cement works 
and saw-mills, steel works, foundries, and machine shops; 
various kinds of factories and warehouses, in stores and 
studios, all for the purpose of providing structural beauty 
and supplying necessary comfort to the travelling public. 

Besides being one of the finest hotel buildings in Canada 
from an architectural standpoint, it is fireproof throughout. It 
is the largest hotel in the British Empire. It has 1,100 rooms 
with bath and toilet conveniences, a large, commodious vesti- 
bule and main corridor, as well as two large convention halls. 
One of these halls, known as the" grand ball room, has a seat- 
ing capacity of 2,000 and the other of 1,200; also, there are 
several private dining rooms besides the large main dining 
room. 

The ground floor is occupied by stores and there are 10 
stories above for the accommodation of guests, the tenth floor 
being used for banquet and convention halls. In the "Pent 
House" above the roof, additional separate and complete units 
for ventilation, refrigeration, etc., are installed. The ground 
floor further contains the most complete and up-to-date kit- 
chen bake ovens, cold storage, refrigerators and general stor- 
age spaces. Below is the basement which contains the most 
modern laundry 'equipment, refrigerating and ice-making ma- 
chinery, also power plant for heating, lighting, ventilation, 
steam-driven refrigerating apparatus, steam-driven electrical 
generating sets and switchboards, also water softening and 
filtering systems. 

Architecture — Georgian and Italian Renaissance 

The exterior architecture of the building is "Georgian," 
and the materials used were well selected for the style so 
adopted. The principal materials used consist of Stanstead 
granite and Canadian Benedict buff stone also Hocking Valley 



March I, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



17 



and Upper Kittanic light buff brick. The interior design is 
generally what is known as "Italian Renaissance." 

The "Georgian" is a neo-classic style of architecture which 
flourished in England from 1715 to 1800, during the reign of 
the Georges. It is a combination of the Italian and the Palla- 
dian styles, divested of excessive ornamentation. 

The architects were Ross & MacDonald, 1 Belmont Place, 
Montreal. The general contractors were Thompson, Starrett 
Company, Ltd., Drummond Building, Montreal, A. G. Moulton, 
vice-president and general manager. 

Power Plant and Equipment 

Some idea of the amount of plant equipment required to 
I meet the needs of this hotel may be gained from the fact 
that there is about 8,000,000 cubic feet of space to be lighted, 
heated and ventilated ; besides the fact that the hotel may be 
called upon to entertain, feed and otherwise look after the 
personal comforts of four to five thousand people at any time, 
and provide sleeping quarters, fully equipped wdth bath, 
toilet, etc., for 1,100 to 2,500 persons. 

The basement and sub-basements are probably better ven- 
tilated than the average hotel or private home, and the whole 
arrangement is so complete in every detail that nearly all the 
wants or needs of its patrons can be supplied within the con- 
fines of this building. 

Ample space and capacity is provided for store-rooms, kit- 
chen bake ovens, laundries, work-shops, ice-making, refriger- 
ating and cold storage; also an abundant supply of fresh air 
• and cold drinking water to each room. 



VISION — THEN AND NOW 

INDOMITABLE faith and wonderful vision are terms 
that have been frequently used in descriptions of 
the New Mount Royal Hotel. It may be interesting 
to recall that faith and vision had much to do with the 
founding of Ville Marie de Montreal in 1641—1642. 
The romantic story had its beginning in Old France 
where one, Jerome de la Dauversiere, desirous of 
launching some plan whereby the red men of Canada 
might be won over to Christianity, claimed to have 
been told by an angel that the first step toward this 
object would be the setting up of a mission on the 
Island of Montreal. From this inspiration developed 
the expedition of Maisonneuve who, with a company 
of fifty, landed on the site of the future metropolis 
some two hundred and eighty years ago. The spot 
had been visited by Cartier one hundred years before, 
but there had been no subsequent settlement. Not 
long did the Iroquois permit the newcomers to re- 
main unmolested and the story of Maisonneuve's heroic 
defence is one of the finest epics of early days in this 
country. His memory has been perpetuated in grace- 
ful form by the statue in Place d'Armes Square. It 
is from this soot that the eastern metropolis has ra- 
diated with characteristic faith, courage, perseverance. 
Maisonneuve and his little company might easily lose 
themselves in the splendid structure that has just 
been completed. It is not the only instance in Can- 
adian history where the visit of a missioner has form- 
ed the foundation for modern perspective and enter- 
prise. 




Steam Engine Driving Stoker. 

The drinking water is supplied from an artesian well, 10 
inches in diameter and 830 feet deep, (875 feet below street 
level). The well penetrates and gets its supply from two 
veins, located respectively at levels of 362 and 830 feet below 
the basement floor. The supply would seem ample, as a test 
made showed a capacity flow of 7,200 gallons per hour of pure 
water at 42 °F. The water is elevated from the 91 foot level 
by means of an air lift or ejector, and the air compressors 
used will be described later in this article. The water, after 
passing through suitable filters, is circulated through brine- 
cooled coils which reduces its temperature to that desired for 
human consumption. The brass pipes through which it is 
circulated are all covered with heavy cork insulation. The 
surplus water goes into the two large storage tanks on the 
roof used for general supply. 

The power plant proper consists of 4 Robb water tube 
boilers, 2 steam-driven generators, 2 steam-driven feed pumps, 
2 steam-driven vacuum pumps, 2 steam-driven supply pumps, 
2 air compressors (one steam-driven and one motor driven) ; 
2 steam-driven refrigerating machines, 2 motor generator 
sets and large motor-driven ventilating fans, motor-driven 



elevator hoists and numerous smaller electric driven circulat- 
ing and sump pumps. The boiler and engine room floors are 
approximately 30 feet below the street level and the main 
portion of the power plant is located in the north-east por- 
tion of the sub-basement or near the corner of Burnside and 
Medcalf Streets. 

About 10 feet below the boiler room floor is the smoke tun- 



300HP BOILERS 



400HP BOILERS 




CATES 

Plan and Elevation of Coal Bunker and Conveyor. 



IS 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 1, 1923 




nel, ash pit tunnel and coal conveyor tunnel. The bottom 
horizontal section of the coal conveyor is about 100 feet long. 

Boiler Room Equipment 

There are installed in the boiler room 4 Robb water tube 
boilers. Two of the boilers are of 400 h.p. capacity each and 
two others are of 300 h.p. each, making a total of 1,400 h.p. 
installed. The boilers are of the double cross-drum type and 
designed to carry 160 lbs. pressure. 

They are not equipped with regular super-heater units, al- 
though there has been provided a special superheating 



Cable Connection To 
Counter-weighted Damper 




feature, the top rows of tubes being so designed that the equal- 
izing steam passing through them is exposed to the hot com- 
bustion gasses in the first stage or pass. The boiler ratings 
are based on the usual formula of 10 sq. ft. of heating sur- 
face per h.p. The boilers are supported upon steel columns. 
The boilers are equipped with Turner baffles, which together 
with the brick settings, and furnace linings, were installed by 
Mander & Lucas. The furnaces are lined with Glenboig fire 
brick and the back passes with Lumber City fire brick. The 
boilers are all equipped with stokers, furnished by the Taylor 
Stoker Company of Canada, Ltd. Two of the stokers have 
3 retorts each and the two others 4 retorts each, there being 
one retort per 100 h.p. demand. Each retort is provided with 
17 tuyeres. The stokers are driven by 4 12% h.p. vertical 
steam engines. The stokers are intended to burn either 
anthracite screenings or slack (bituminous) coal or a mixture 
of both. The overload capacity of these stokers is 200% of 
rating. 

The compressor plant is described as comprising an In- 
gerso'll-Rand class ER-1 single stage straight line short belt 
motor driven air compressor equipped with the latest type of 
I-R plate valves, permitting higher overall efficiency than 
any similar equipment yet produced. This unit is used for 
regular operation, and for standby purposes, an Ingersoll- 
Rand class FR-1 I-R single stage straight line steam driven 
compressor is installed. This machine is also equipped with the 
latest type o'f plate valves and I-R balanced piston steam 
valve. An unique feature of the compressor or plant, which is 
strictly up-to-date in all respects, is that special precautions 
were made to prevent the noise of operation from travelling 
throughout the building. 

The advantages of this plant are extreme simplicity and 



Direct To Combustion 
Chamber 




Damper Regulator 



Inside view of furnace showing multiple retorts of stoker. 



March 1, 1923 



19 




Sectional view of stoker, showing series of coal feeding p.ungers 

reliability, large capacity, limited only by the source of supply, 
low maintenance cost and great flexibility. A further ad- 
vantage is that the water is very thoroughly aerated by the 
amalgamation of the air and water passing through the dis- 
charge pipe. The extensive aeration to which the water is sub- 
jected and the natural filtration due to the subterranean 
sources of supply produce a pure undefiled water which is 
particularly adapted to hotels, breweries, bottling works and 
municipalities. 

The advantages of the particular type of pump installed 
are: Realization in the most efficient manner of all of the ad- 
vantages to be gained by use of an air lift pump. In practice 
the air in the Type "VA" Pump is divided into fine streams 
which is an essential requirement in air lift pump efficiency. 

A proper amount of back pressure is held in the pump and 
prevents sudden rush of air due to the coalescence o'f bubbles 
and lightening of the discharge column. There are no moving 
parts whatever. The foot piece offers a smooth, unobstructed 



entrance and discharge chamber. There are no nozzles or ob- 
structions. 

It is impossible to prevent scale and dirt passing down the 
air lines into the pumps, consequently provision must be made 
to eliminate any such trouble with certainty. In the class 
"VA" pump any foreign material which may come down the 
air pipe falls through the unobstructed openings between the 
outside casing and the inner tube. 

This regulator made by the Craig Regulator Company of 
Canada is a very simple device, and its control of the damper 
is actuated by fluctuation in the draft over the fire, with the 
result that if the draft becomes excessive beyond the point for 
which the regulator is set, the damper is closed sufficiently 
to bring it back to normal, and vice versa. 

A glance at the line drawing will make the following de- 
scription very clear. The 2 in. pipe B opens directly into the 
combustion chamber, at one end, and as shown under the gaso- 
meter float A in the regulator itself, the gasometer float is 
connected through a chain F to a plunger C which moves 
vertically in a multi-port valve opening and closing the ports 
with the movement of A. The piston E is in a cylinder off 
which the multi-ports of the valve just mentioned open. This 
cylinder is fed by water from a pipe G from city water supply, 
which is controlled by a needle valve. The counterweight D bal- 
ances the plunger C, chain F, and gasometer float A, and any 
extra weight in this counterweight takes care of the position 
of the damper to give the required draft. 

The action, briefly, is as follows: Any extra suction at D 
exerts a downward pull on A, and consequent downward move- 
ment of C, closing off the ports in the multi-port valve. Im- 
mediately the pressure in the piston chamber above E is built 
up through the inflow of water at G, causing a downward 
movement of the piston and a closing of the damper which 
will reduce the suction. It should be noted that the piston E 
by the closing action of the damper, will be comparatively 
slow, as the inflow of water through G is cut down to a min- 
imum by the needle valve. On the other hand, when the reverse 
action takes place, the plunger C rises and opens as many ports 
in the valve as the decreased draft condition dictates, allow- 
ing a quick rise of the piston E, and the consequent quick 
opening of the damper. 

Forced (Balanced) Draft System 

The forced draft equipment consists of 2 (Keith) Shel- 
don's, Ltd., fans supplied by Ross G. Greig, of Montreal. The 
fans are driven by two 25 h.p. vertical steam engines, by the 
Troy Engine Foundry & Machinery Company, of Troy, Pa. 
The forced draft fans and engines are set in an offset direct- 
ly in front of the boilers. These fans are used in combination 




Pressure Filters. 



Water Softener. 



H. W. Supply Tank. 



20 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 1, 1923 




Vacuum Pumps and Return Traps. 



with a Craig damper regulator attached to each boiler which 
results in a balanced draft being maintained automatically. 

An unusual feature encountered here is the "down-draft" 
direction of the gases or products of combustion from the 
last pass to a smoke tunnel below and thence up to a round 
(brick-lined) steel stack or chimney. 

The water columns are all equipped with high and low 
water alarms. The safety valves consist of two 4" "Pop" or 
spring leaded type of valve supplied by T. McAvity & Sons. 

Feed water regulators — Each boiler is equipped with 




Main Sump-Pumps and Fan Room. 



Copes feed water regulators, made by the Northern Equip- 
ment Company, and supplied by Peacock Bros., Montreal. 
They automatically regulate the flow of feed water to meet 
requirements. 

Main stop and non-return valves — There are four 6 "D" main 
stop non-return Lunkenheimer steam valves, supplied by the 
Garth Company, Montreal; also Lunkenheimer stop and check 
valves in the feed water lines. 

Blow-down valves — There are two sets of blow-down valves 
to each boiler, one is of the type of everlasting B. O. valve; 
and the other consists of Lunkenheimer gate valves. The 




Brine and Fresh Water Pumps. 



blow-down discharges into a large B. 0. or expansion tank, 
made by Darling B ros., Montreal. The drains from the above 
tank are led into a sump-pit or tank below the boiler room 
floor, and a set of ejector pumps remove the waste water to 
the main sump-pit. The steam gauges, made by the Foxboro 
Company, Foxboro, Mass., and were supplied by Peacock 
Bros., of Montreal. 

Boiler meters. — Each boiler is equipped with a Bailey boiler 
meter type 26, class 56, which indicates and records the air 
flow, steam flow and the flue gas temperature, also the draft 
in the fire box; in addition to the above there is an integrat- 
ing feature which totalizes the flow of steam for any desired 
period. 

Steam flow meters. — There are two Bailey steam flow 
meters, type C6, class 1, which indicate and record the flow 
of steam other than that used for power and heating pur- 
poses. They are also equipped with an integrating feature 
for totalizing the amount used for any desired period. One 
of them is used to meter the steam used in the kitchen, and 
the other to meter the steam used in the laundry. It is quite 
important that the steam used for power in summer and that 
used for heating in winter should be determined by similar 
instruments. In this way the amount of condensate going 
to the sewer could be determined and in such a large plant 
the corrective value of such information would prove valuable 
and result in a direct economy. 

Steam and Hot Water Distribution 

Steam branches from the boilers are all connected into 
a 10 in. main steam header or "log" from which an 8 in. loop 
provided steam for all the auxiliary steam pumps and en- 
gines located in the engine and fan room. 

The steam is distributed first at 160 lbs. as above described, 
another line known as the high intermediate carries 80 lbs., 
another known as the low intermediate carries 40 lbs. and the 
low pressure from 2 to 3 lbs. is used for heating purposes 
entirely. All the steam piping from 5" up to 10" as well as 
all brass and iron pipe is of the Crane make, and all high 
pressure steam valves are of the Lunkenheimer make; Crane 
valves are used for low pressure steam heating. 

Philip Carey — 85 per cent, magnesia pipe covering was 
used by Wm. Rutherford & Sons for all tanks and steam 
pipes. The feed water control and check valves are Lunken- 
heimer make supplied by Garth & Co. 

A Bailey feed water meter, type C2, class A, is used to in- 
dicate and record the flow of feed water to the boilers; the 
temperature of the feed water is also indicated and recorded; 
also this meter is equipped with a special integrating feature 
which totalizes the amount of feed water used for any desired 
period. 

Feed water pumps.— The two 10y2x8x24" steam driven, 
vertical direct acting. Weir feed water pumps, through Pea- 
cock Bros., are the latest design of the G. & J. Weir Pump 
Company. Their capacity is, in excess of that required, (200 
lbs. head at a speed of 12 double strokes per minute), 5,930 
imp. gallons each per hour. These pumps are equipped with 
Copes feed water pump regulators. There are two size 5 
Blackburn & Smith Corp. feed water filters. 

The feed water heater, illustrated here, has a capacity of 
3,950 gallons per hour and is of the closed type. It 
is heated generally by exhaust steam and is equipped with a 
Powers automatic temperature regulator. 

In the winter time there will be a large amount of conden- 
sate from the heating system returned to the hot well or feed 
water supply tank; and the make-up water is taken from the 
two large storage tanks upon the roof. Each storage tank 
has a capacity of 10,000 gallons of filtered water. Further 
provision has been made for supplying the boilers direct from 
the two city water service connections. There are in all five 
sources of feed water supply. 

(1) High pressure city water direct to boilers at 135 lb 

(2) Filtered water from the service supply pumps at 150 
lbs. 

(3) Low pressure city water (60 lbs.) by feed pumps at 
175 lbs. 



March- 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



21 




Air Compressor Outfits. 




Refrigerating Machine. 



(4) Hot Water returns from the heating system by feed 
pumps at 175 lbs. 

(5) Water from the artesian well, should an emergency 
require at 15 to 175 lbs. 

City water connections — Provision has been made for two 
water connections, one from the high pressure service (Peel 
St.) at 135 lbs., and another from the low pressure (Burn- 
side) at 60 lb. One very objectionable feature, an engineer 
will note here, is the ust by the city of Montreal of left- 
handed stop valves. Such a practice should be discontinued 
at the earliest possible moment. 

Pressure water filters — The 6-78" Refinite pressure fil- 
ters shown here have a capacity each of 6,000 Imperial gals, 
on a basis of three gallons per square foot per 
minute. The hot water supply for wash basins, baths and 
shower baths, also kitchen and laundry, is provided for by 
five large cylindrical tanks, heated by exhaust steam. One 
of them is used exclusively for the laundry. They have a 
combined capacity of 19,000 gallons per hour. 



Water softener and brine tank — The 60 inch water soft- 
ener and brine tank by Refinite Co. of Canada has a guar- 
anteed capacity of 46,000 Imperial gals, in 10 hours. The 
softened water is provided for use in the laundry. 

General supply and fire pumps — The general water supply 
for the building, also en.ergency for fire purposes, is pro- 
vided for by two steam driven 17x12x21 direct acting vertical 
Weir pumps. They were supplied by Peacock Bros., and have 
a capacity each of 24,000 Imperial gals, per hour at 170 lbs., 
(speed 26 double strokes per minute). Although the build- 
ing is thoroughly fireproof, there will be at times consider- 
able combustible material stored in it, so that arrangements 
were made that either one or both of these pumps could be 
used for fire purposes. 

Vacuum pumps — The condensate from the heating system 
is handled by means of four Darling Bros, steam-driven vac- 
uum pumps. 

Condensate from the laundry during the summer is handled 
by Crane lifting traps. 




Engine and Fan For Forced Draft. 



Johnson Regulator and Air Compressor 



22 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 1, 1923 



An air compressor in a modern power plant is now con- 
sidered indispensable. The Mount Royal is provided with two 
12x10, made by the Canadian Ingersoll-Rand Company, Sher- 
braoke, Que. One is a steam driven unit and the other is 
motor driven by a Westinghouse electric motor. 

Direct and Indirect Heating 

Direct Heating — Some idea of the amount of radiation re- 
quired may be gained from the fact that there is approximate- 
ly 8,000,000 cubic feet of space to be heated, with a very large 
glass and outside wall exposure. There are installed 2,500 
units of varying sizes of steam radiators by the Dominion 
Radiator Co. in the various bed, bath, reception, dining and 
special rooms, and the heating of them is controlled as re- 
quired by modulation valves and thermostatic traps. It is es- 
timated that from 60,000 to 63,000 square feet of radiation 




WALTER T. ARMSTRONG, 



was required to heat the building, including, both the direct 
and indirect systems. 

Indirect Heating — In connection with each fresh air supply 
fan, is a heating unit consisting of a bank of steam-heated 
pipe coils and in combination with it is an air washing or 
spraying system which controls and regulates the humidity or 
proper amount of moisture which the air should contain for 
health and comfort. The indirect radiation installed is approx- 
imately 11,000 square feet. 

The heating equipment, the Kieley & Mueller steam pres- 
sure reducing valves, as well as Lunkenheimer valves consti- 
tute a Garth Co. installation. Low pressure steam valves were 
by Crane Company. All steam and water pressure gauges 
used, both indicating and recording, were of Foxboro make 
through Peacock Bros., Montreal. The condensate or hot water 
returns are handled in winter time by four Darling vacuum 
pumps. During the summer time the hot water returns are 
handled by Crane tilting and lifting traps. 

Ventilation and Air Exhaust 

There are a number- of screened openings from which a 
fresh air supply is taken in at different parts of the building; 
however, there has been provided a cold air shaft direct from 
the roof which supplies fresh air to the main fan room situated 
in the sub-basement. 

The fresh air supply to the main indirect heating is washed 
and carries the proper amount of moisture introduced before 
it is delivered to the lobby, main dining and special rooms. 
There are installed 10 fresh air supply fans and 14 air ex- 
haust fans, all of which are of the Keith pattern, by Sheldons, 
Ltd., of Gait, Ont. They are driven by Westinghouse motors, 



which vary in capacity from 3 to 30 h.p. Auxiliary ventilation 
in the "Pent House" on roof is provided to take care of the 
grand ball or banquet room and convention halls on the 9th 

floor. 

The hot air supplied to -the various roonis passes thi-ough 
a "diagonal grill" or lattice-like face plate, by Tuttle & Bailey, 
Bridgeburg, Ont. The galvanized air-boxes or duct through 
which the hot air is supplied to the rooms and the used air is 
changed frequently or exhausted, are by Baxter & Webber, 
Montreal. Two hundred tons of Keystone galvanized iron was 
used to complete the amount of air duct required, and an 
average of 30 men have been employed constantly for several 
months making and erecting the work right on the job. 

Ice-Making and Refrigeration 

The main refrigerating and ice-making machines consist 
of what is said to be the first steam uniflow engines with 
poppet valves for both intake and exhaust, driving ammonia 
gas compressors. The complete outfit was manufactured and 
installed by the Frick. Ice and Refrigerating Machine Com- 
pany, Montreal. The engines are fly-wheel-governed and de- 
signed to operate at high speeds, ranging from 150 r.p.m. 
normal to 325 r.p.m. maximum. The vertical enclosed type of 
ammonia compressors are designed to compress the gas to 
125 lbs. normal and 175 lbs. maximum. They have a capacity, 
each of 40 tons normal and 60 tons maximum. They were 
installed with a guaranteed capacity of 75 tons of ice per day. 

The ammonia gas, after being compressed, is passed through 
a bank of condenser coils, where the temperature of the com- 
pressed gas is further reduced at least to 52 F., after which 
some of it passes either to a low temperature refrigerator or 
the ice making room, where expansion caKes place and the gas 
absorbs the heat from the substances to be frozen. Another 




Frick Uniflow Engine and Ammonia Compressors. 



portion of the compressed gas is expanded in coils about which 
the brine is circulated. The brine, after imparting its heat to 
the ammonia gas while it is expanding, becomes reduced in 
temperature and is circulated to the various tanks and re- 
frigerators where only a moderately low temperature is de- 
sired. The drinking water supply for the guests is cooled by 
passing through a brine-cooled tank. The ammonia gas after 
expansion and absorption is drawn back into the compressors 
by the suction effect of the receding compressor pistons, and 
there compressed as previously described, thus completing the 
cycle. 

In the ice-making room, which is about 30 feet square, there 
are about 500 large cans (8" x 16" x 32"), immersed in a tank 
full of a brine solution. The brine is circulated around and in 
between the immersed cans by means of two special brine 
agitators, driven by two 54 h.p. Relience electric motors. The 
cans are filled with 100 lbs. of filtered water and when frozen 
are removed from the tank to the unloading and ice storage 
room ; the cans are later returned to the tank filled with water 
and immersed again in the brine circulation. 



March 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer. Plumber and Steamfitter 



23 



Giving Preference in Heating Systems 

The High Spots Told in Story Form — First Applications, and 
How History Appears to be Repeating Itself — Why, How and 
When to Give Preference to the Various Systems of Heating- 
Steam Vapor, or Hot Water Heating 

By Edwin Newsome, Consulting Engineer 



WHEN steam is looked upon as 
dangerous, when vapor or 
vacuum steam heating is viewed 
with some amount of suspicion, when 
one pipe jobs are preferred to regular 
two pipe jobs, when hot water heating is 
boosted sky'high no matter what the con- 
ditions are, well — there's something 
wrong. The heating engineer who, un- 
der every condition prefers any of the 
systems referred to, has not taken the 
subject of heating seriously. 

The "smart alec" who invented a one 
pipe steam job should have lived to hear 
all the hammering and all the "cuss 
words" caused by such impractical and 
unnatural systems, and he would have 
made a capital booster for two pipe jobs, 
or else held both hands up in favor of 
hot water heating. Steam should be 
looked upon as a blessing in the heating 
world and it is to those who know what 
steam is and the flexibility of a steam 
heating system. This does not mean 
that no matter what kind of a building 
is to be heated, that steam should be 
given preference. But, before entering 
with the fundamentals governing sys- 
tems of heating one thing at least can be 
said in favor of steam, that while it 
can reasonably be adapted to the heat- 
ing of any building in some form or 
another under any condition, the same 
cannot be said of hot water heating 
every time. It has its limitations. 

Big Strides Made 

The heating engineer, therefore, if 
he ever truly wishes to be worthy of the 
name, must accept the responsibilities 
attached to such a title, and must study 
thoroughly the fundamental principles 
connected and related to the science of 
heating. And, if he does so he will be 
amazed at the great strides being made 
in the application of heat, and the vari- 
ous methods now being adopted. 

Some of the most radical steps made 
recently in the heating of buildings, ap- 
pear to be taking us back to a period 
something like 4,000 years ago, that of 
the method of indirect heating adopted 
in the Oriental countries and by the cave 
men of prehistoric times. 

The prehistoric cave man built fire 
places outside his cave, made tunnels un- 
der the floor of his abode to act as a 
kind of chimney, and the heat from the 
flame and the smoke were utilized to 
heat the interior of his home. • 

In Japan, houses were built, and, it is 
said, are still built with hollow tile floors. 



Some of these hollow tiles are similarly 
used. 

How System is Laid Out 

In the British Isles the very same 
method or rather .the principle is adopt- 
ed by some of the largest heating engin- 
eering firms there. The general sys- 
tem is laid out in the following man- 
ner: 

First, a steam boiler is installed in a 
basement or sub-basement, vento radia- 
tors or box coils are hung up in 
the ceilings of the basement, #nd iron 
casings placed around the coils or 
vento radiators, cold air pipes are 
fitted to same with a small individual 
fan to each box, warm air ducts are 
placed in the boxes too, and installed un- 
der floors and through walls. The fans 



2 i g Boiling 
water 




Melting 
i c e 



also re-circulate the air through the 
warm air ducts, and no outlets in the 
floors or walls are installed, so that none 
of the actual heated air is allowed to 
enter the buildings, none of this warm 
air is inhaled by the occupants of the 
rooms. 

As the heat passes through the ducts, 
it warms the rooms. Of course, the 
walls and floors are literally full of 
warm air ducts, so that one would al- 
most be led to believe that we are only 
a few steps ahead in the final results 
procured by our prehistoric ancestors, if 
results are to be considered. 

What is Heat? 

It is regrettable to note how very few 
men who are engaged in the installing 
of heating systems, know even the first 
principles involved in the heating of a 
building or buildings. Too many by far, 
are there who (while to be admired for 
the apparent courage) know so little 
about heating. They are those who, 
having worked a few years with pipe fit- 
ting tools, installed a few jobs that have 
been laid out by manufacturers of boilers 
and radiators, think they know all about 
heating. It would be safe to say that 
20 per cent, more coal is wasted than 
would be if some laws were put into 
force that would require each man en- 
gaged in the heating engineering pro- 
fession to pass some examination and 
all his work be inspected by competent 
engineers. However, this is taking us 
away from the question, "What is 
Heat?" 

Very often the simplest question re- 
garding every-d.ay phenomena, wil puzzle 
the wisest of us. We are so familiar 
with the effect, with the things we look 
upon as quite commonplace, and the ef- 
fects which those things have upon our 
daily life that we seldom, if ever, trouble 
ourselves as to the cause of these various 
conditions so very necessary to our 
standard of living and as a matter of 
fact to every progressive stride made. 

If we could only see what really hap- 
pens when we strike a match, and watch 
it burn, we would witness such an ele 
emental battle as has never taken place 
on any battle field recorded in history. 

Thousands of trillions of minute mole- 
cules clashing with enormous velocity 
against each other, countless brigades of 
contestants forming and reforming into 
battle line, hurling each other together 
against as many trillions of apparent 



24 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 1, 1923 



enemies. Such a battle as would make 
the battle of the Marne appear more like 
a garden party conducted by a Sunday 
school executive. 

A Form of Motion 

And the application of heat, in vari- 
ous forms is wonderful, which to know 
of would fill one with wonderment. If 
we could only see what takes place when 
heat is applied to iron or steel, bras.;, 
copper or any other incompressible mat- 
ter we would be filled with awe. And, 
more than all, we would then only begin 
to realize what heat is. "Heat is a 
form of motion." "Heat is energy." 
"Life is heat." 

Matter is made up of tiny particles 
called molecules, so small, says Sir 
William Thomson, that if a small drop 
of water was magnified to the size of 
the earth, the molecules of water would 
each be less than the size of an ordinary 
baseball. 

On the other hand, if we cool, or al- 
low to cool, either water or gases, steam 
or even anything compressible, as well 
as iron, brass, copper, steel or any other 
incompressible solids, these tiny, tiny 
molecules move slower. Proving still 
conclusively that according to tempera- 
ture all elements, material of a metal, 
fluid or gaseous nature, is warmer when 
the natural or specific molecules are in 
active motion. 

How Molecules Move 

There is, however, a difference in the 
molecules, and the molecular motion in 
the three conditions in which matter ex- 
ists: — In solids, the moleclues move back 
and forth, just like tiny pendulums; in 
liquids, the molecules wander all around 
without any apparent aim and in no reg- 
ular set path; in gases the motion is 
supposed to be in perfectly straight lines. 

We are all familiar with the effects of 
heat upon the body, and are not slow to 
recognize the presence or absence of heat 
by the sense of feeling. This heat or 
temperature, we would define as sensible 
unsafe guide to the real condition of 
substance with respect to their tempera- 
ture. 

A person, returning from a walk in 
zero weather, entering a room the tem- 
perature therein being, say, 50° Faht., 
has the impression that the room is very 
nice and warm, whereas if another per- 
son entering the same room at the same 
moment from another room in which the 
temperature registered 75° Faht. would 
feel the room very cold, hence the need 
for some reliable temperature recording 
instrument which will tell the occupants 
of a room or building, exactly what the 
actual temperature of a room is. 

The first practical thermometer was 
invented by Galileo prior to the year 
1597. It consisted of a glass bulb, fill- 
ed with air and dipping it into a vessel 
containing colored water. 

When the air in the bulb became hot- 



ter, its molecules moved faster and ex- 
erted more pressure upon anything with 
which they came in contact. They sub- 
sequently pushed the liquid down the 
tube. When the air was cooled, the very 
reverse happened and the atmospheric 
pressure forced the liquid up the tube. 
This tube is marked with an arbitrary 
scale. 

This instrument crude as it was did 
one thing, or at least convinced scientists 
that some standard and reliable fixed 
scale must be formed if such instrument 
were ever to rise to the dignity of an 
accurate "measurer" of temperature. 

It was then found that water at sea 
level will boil at 212° Faht. and this was 
adopted as one of the important mark- 
ings. Then it was found that water 
would become frozen at 32° Faht. sea 
level. But more interesting than all is 
how even these figures were arrived at 
by Fahrenheit, cumbersome as they no 
doubt are. He did, however, plan to 
make a thermometer that would without 
question tell the truth, the absolute 
truth about the temperature of a body, 
no matter in what form that body may 
be. 

Fahrenheit did not want to start his 
scale at freezing point, because he knew 
quite well that there was a lower de- 
gree, or many degrees below mere freez- 
ing point, because he could create a low- 
er temperature than 32° by mixing pound- 
ed ice with common salt. This he could 
do any time of the year, at any altitude 
ard in any place. He then, in his ex- 
perimental work, took such a mixture, 
suddenly plunged a tube and bulb con- 
taining mercury, into a vessel contain- 
ing the ice and salt and scratched a zero 
mark on the glass tube at the top of 
the mercury column and this was the be- 
ginning of the Fahrenheit thermo- 
meter. The temperature thus recorded, he 
defined as being the absolute zero point. 

He then calculated the mercury volume 
at that temperature and found it to be 
11,124 parts. Next he promptly ex- 
panded the mercury in the same tube, 
by placing it in a mixture of ice and 
water and found that it occupied 11,156 
parts by volume or 32 parts of an in- 
crease over the zero volume, and accord- 
ingly scratched the number 32 at this 
new height of the mercury column, and 
called it freezing point of water. Next 
he placed his newly designed "themo- 
meter" in boiling water. The mercury 
expanded to 11,3"6 parts, or 212 parts 
higher than zero. This he called the 
boiling point of water. He then divided 
the scale between 32 and 212 into 180 
equal divisions which he called degrees, 
and his scale was complete. 

Our readers will see by the above ex- 
periments, that there appears to be a 
motive power in mercury and air, as 
well as in all substances, when such ma- 
terials are subjected to varying tem- 
peratures. This motive power requires 
some form of energy such as coal, fuel 



oil, wood or any substance containing 
heat and subjected to the ordinary treat- 
ment we call burning. Thus bringing 
us to our main subject, that of the 
science of heating systems. 

(To Be Continued) 




DeBroke (roused by his wife): 
"What's that you say? A burglar?" 

Mrs. DeBroke: "Yes. Fancy a burg- 
lar calling on us!" 

DeBroke: "Suppose we let him climb 
in. Then I'll give a yell and it may 
make him drop something he has got 
somewhere else." 

* * * * 

"I can't do a thing with Jones," said 
the manager. "I've had him in three de- 
partments, and he dozes all day long." 

"That's easy," replied the really effi- 
cient efficiency engineer. 

"Put him at the pyjama counter, and 
fasten this card on him: 

" 'Our night-clothes are of such su- 
perior quality that even the man who 
sells them cannot keep awake.' " 

* ' $ if- * 

A tourist in Scotland, stopping at a 
cottage for a drink, observed the old 
inhabitant attempting to chop a large 
log of wood with an ancient-looking axe. 

"That's an old axe you've got there, 
isn't it, dad?" he asked. 

"Aye, it is," came the reply; "it's nigh 
on a hundred years old." 

"Indeed," said the surprised tourist, 
"I shouldn't have thought it was so old 
as that." 

"A'well, mebbe it's not exactly that," 
answered the old man. "It's had two 
new heads and three new handles since 
then!" 



Old Ebenezer was whitewashing his 
barn with a brush that had very few 
bristles left in it. The squire happened 
to pass and said: 

"Why don't you get a brush with 
more bristles in it, Ebenezer?" 

"What for, squire?" asked the old 
man. 

"What for?" shouted the squire. 
"Why, man, if you had a proper brush 
you could do twice as much work." 

"Mebbe so, squire; mebbe so," re- 
sponded the old chap placidly. "Only 
I ain't got twice as much work to do." 



March 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



25 



Compound Angle Elbow Patterns 

Prepared for Sanitary Engineer by O. W. Kothe, Principal, St. 
Louis Technical Institute, St. Louis, Missouri 




Designs for Compound Angle Elbows. 



IN HEATING and ventilating square 
duct work, it is often necessary to 
make fittings that branch out from 
a main duct, taking on a quarter turn 
and also drop in the space of a few feet. 
Fittings of this kind are necessary in 
public buildings as well as ventilation 
systems on board ships. For such a prob- 
lem we first draw a section through 
main duct and then we describe the 
amount of angle this branch is to have, 
giving the radius of throat preferably 
two diameters or widths. Next describe 
the plan of duct and the branch from the 
center Y. Observe the end elevation 
branch is described from X and that we 
divide the throat of plan in equal spaces. 
From each of these points we erect lines 
to cross the heel of plan and also the 
throat and heel lines of end elevation. 

Observe this treatment adjusts the 
lines on all sides of the fitting if though 
lines were square around all four sides 
made equal to the width as they will 
work out on that side, which widths are 
shown on the lines I, II. Ill and IV. The 
shaded rectangle of plan begets its line 
from the elevation which is bisected in 
order to treat that space which could not 
be treated from the throat of plan. 
Now to set out the patterns, we pick 



the girth from the end elevation and de- 
velop it from the plan, while the girth 
from the plan is picked and developed 
from the end elevation. So we pick the 
girth, taking each space separately from 
the heel III and set it on line A-B in 
pattern III. Drop stretchout lines and 
from each point in branch of end eleva- 
tion square over lines, thus developing 
the miters as shown. In the same way 
pick the girth from the throat of plan 
IV and set on a line as E-F and develop 
in the same way. Repeat this by picking 
the girth from elevation as heel I and set 
on line G-H and develop from plan. Next 
pick the throat line from elevation II and 
set on line C-D and develop from plan 
as shown. . 

Observe the throat and heel lines of 
both the elevation and plan are used as 
staves for forming these patterns, since 
the patterns must take on the same bend 
shown by these heel and throat lines in 
our working drawings. 



Fairbanks-Morse Co. Sales 
Convention 
Montreal. — A five-day sales conven- 
tion of the Canadian Fairbanks-Morse 
Co. Ltd., was held in Montreal, those 



present including a number of heads of 
divisions of the United States Company, 
including the following from Chicago: J. 
P. Harper, oil engines; E. D. West, 
farm engines; F. V. Roy, scales; L. J. 
Osborn, electrical. Henry J. Fuller, New 
York, chairman of the board of direc- 
tors, was also in attendance. 

Speaking at the opening session of the 
convention on Tuesday, Mr. Fuller evinc- 
ed much optimism regarding trade pros- 
pects for the year, both as regards the 
company and as to the business world as 
a whole. A similar trend of thought ran 
through all the addresses which follow- 
ed. Each of the visiting division heads 
addressed the convention along the par- 
ticular line in which he is a specialist. 

The sessions were held in the new 
Mount Royal Hotel, a dinner being held 
there on Thursday followed by a theatre 
the whole staff of the head office were 
the guests of the firm. 

The following managers of the Cana- 
dian branches of the organization were 
in Montreal for the convention: W. A. 
Akhurst, Vancouver; K. N. Forbes, Win- 
nipeg; F. W. Evans, Toronto; W. J. 
Hill, St. John; J. N. Charles, Windsor; 
T. H. McWilliam, Ottawa; J. J. Marnell, 
Quebec; M. V. Cordell, Montreal. 



26 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 1, 1923 



Plumber anddteam fitter of Canada 

ESTABLISHED 1907 

Member Audit Bureau of Circulations 
PUBLISHED TWICE MONTHLY BY 

The MacLeafi Publishing Company, Limited 

Montreal TORONTO, CANADA Winnipeg 

Vol. XVII. MARCH 1, 1923 No. 5 



Inter-Provincial Boiler Code 

'-pHE Inter-Provincial boiler code is now a fact, and is in use 
in the larger number of the provinces of the Dominion. 
The regulations have been set out in book form, and are now 
available to the public, at a price of SI per copy. 

It is interesting to note that the first conference held at 
which representatives of the different provincial governments 
were present, to consider a uniform law, was as far back as 
1909. The provinces represented on that occasion were Bri- 
tish Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario. 
The regulations drawn up at that conference were adopted by 
the provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Ontario. 

The regulations then adopted, while good in their way, were 
not comprehensive enough, and left many points uncovered, so 
that there naturally arose differences of interpretation. Owing 
to this, a further conference was held in Ontario in 1914, at 
which the regulations were revised and amendments recom- 
mended, but owing to the outbreak of war, and the general 
disorganization which followed, these recommendations were 
not officially adopted. 

Nothing more was done until 1918, when a further meet- 
ing of the interested provinces was held in the Manitoba pro- 
vincial buildings, at which the whole question was thoroughly 
gone into, and consideration given to suggestions which had 
been put forward by manufacturers, boiler makers, etc. The 
regulations as drawn up at this meeting were submitted to the 
Boiler Code Committee of the Engineering Institute of Canada, 
the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, and others for criti- 
cism. After this, a meeting was held in New Westminster in 
1920, at which final revision of the code was made after study- 
ing the reports received. It will thus be seen that from the 
time of the first consideration of this question until its final 
adoption a period of thirteen years has elapsed. Of course, 
there is no doubt that the war threw things back to some ex- 
tent, but in any case, it is evident that at least eight or nine 
years would have been consumed in effecting this very desir- 
able reform. 

It is an excellent thing from the point of view of the boiler 
manufacturer, and also of the boiler purchaser. It ensures 
the manufacturer the opportunity of building a boiler that will 
comply with the regulations in any province, while the pur- 
chaser has no fear of buying a boiler in Ontario that will not 
pass inspection in Manitoba, and vice versa. The regulations 
adopted have also provided for the use of boiler material which 
has been made to the specifications of the British Board of 
Trade, so that a manufacturer importing his plates, or a firm 
importing boilers from Great Britain will not be penalised. 

Practically every province, with the exception of New 
Brunswick and Prince Edward Island, have adopted these regu- 
lations, and it will most likely be but a short time until they 
are in force in these latter provinces. The advantages of uni- 
formity are too many for them to be neglected by any modern 
government department or private business concern. 



Watching Your Collections 

"T^OO MANY plumbers are hesitant in forcing payment of 
long outstanding bills against families which have been 
trading with them for years. They take the attitude that they 
are good and will eventuajly pay up, and for the sake of old 
friendships don't like to force them into payment for fear of 
alienating associations and losing their trade." Thus 
spoke a credit man connected with a large wholesale institu- 
tion to the writer recently. There is undoubtedly good 
grounds for the above assertion and we could even go a little 
farther and add that some plumbers make little effort to 
collect any account be it long outstanding or not. Apparently 
they are quite content to sit back and wait until the customers 
are good and ready to pay up. 

At this period in the year when the business has been in- 
ventoried and profits and perhaps losses are being tallied, 
there is no better time' to get after some of the slow pays and 
for the plumber to establish a system of credit which will bring 
in the money more promptly. 

One good rule to follow is to adhere rigidly to a set time 
when accounts should be paid. An understanding should be 
had with customers as to when that time should be. A 
plumber may find he has some customers who get a weekly pay 
envelope while others get theirs fortnightly or monthly, but 
whatever the credit limit is, the plumber should see that the 
account is settled on the date specified. This may mean los- 
ing a few accounts, but once a credit policy is determined 
and adopted, it will not be long before the trade will come 
around, willing to play the game according to the rules of 
the plumber. 

Keen competition and the establishing of cash and carry 
stores are two factors which are working hand in hand to 
eliminate "long time accounts" but to help the good thing 
along it needs the shoulder of every plumber at the wheel. 
Outstanding accounts of long duration should be cleared up. 
Bills should be collected promptly. No balances should be 
allowed to accumulate and a firm policy of credits should be 
adopted and enforced. 



Character Through Advertising 

fHILE attending a recent convention, of which an ex- 
hibition of manufactured products was a feature, a 
large buyer observed that he, more or less unconsciously, felt 
a keener interest in those goods that were always most con- 
sistently advertised. This feeling he attributed to the fact 
that he had been made familiar with those lines through their 
advertising, and felt that he needed no introduction in his 
visit of inspection to their displays. 

Another phase of the same matter was commented upon 
by the president of a manufacturing concern doing an export 
business. He emphasized the fact that advertising was valu- 
able to salesmen because it prepared beforehand those terri- 
tories with which he was unfamiliar. In other words, the 
advertising preceded the salesmen and did a certain amount 
of pioneering work for them. 

Advertisers are sometimes inclined to overlook the de- 
velopment work that is always going on through the columns 
of their trade newspapers. It emphasizes the fact that an 
advertising appropriation well placed is of the nature of an 
investment. 



Two years ago ribald journalists were commenting in- 
elegantly on the advertising of deodorants for ladies; to-day 
we find advertising of deodorants for men. 

Now that every well-regulated hotel and apartment is sup- 
posed to have at least as many baths as rooms, is a reaction 
starting ? 



March 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



27 



MINUTE MESSAGE 

Written for "Sanitary Engineer" by FRANK STOCKDALE 

(Profit Figuring Series) 




Take a Tip from this Fellow — He 
Cuts the Right Pie 

WHEN you say your cost of doing business is 25%, or whatever it happens to be, 
you mean 25% of the sale. And you are right. 

The reason is that you divided the total amount of your expenses by the total 
amount of your sales to get this 25%. 25% is the same as a quarter of the pie and it is 
plain to see that a quarter of the cost pie is not as much as a quarter of the sale pie. 

There is no chance for you to get anything out of the small pie, because that goes to 
the wholesaler or manufacturer who sold you the goods. The one place to get your 
share is from the larger pie, and — 

To get your share you must mark your goods right. 

Suppose for example you want to make a net profit of 5% of your sales. What you 
want is 5% or 1 /20 of the larger pie. In this case your gross profit or margin must be 
25% to cover your cost of doing business and 5% for your net profit or a total of 30% 
of the sale. 

The total sale, of course, is 100% and if the margin (gross profit) is 30%, the cost 
of the goods must be 70%. If the cost of your goods is 70% of your sale, then divide 
your cost by 70 and you have the right selling price. 

Apply this to any article in your store. 

First cost of goods -f- (100% — gross profit) — selling price. 
Example: $1.40 -f- (100%— 30%) 70 = $2.00. 

Substitute your own figures. You can depend on this method. It always works out 
right. 

THINK IT OVER— APPLY IT IN YOUR BUSINESS 
All Rights Reserved 
(Exclusive Publication in the Plumbing Trade in Canada) 



2 s 



janitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 1, 192a 



Landing Old Sigh Low for a Compleat 
Plumbing and Heating Job" 

Jerry Continues His Relation of Experiences Commenced in Last 
Issue, Showing His Progress With Old Sigh Low 

With apologies to Ring Lardner, by MAJOR L. L. ANTHES, Managing Director 
Anthes Foundry Company, Toronto 



Tarraboonie, Feb. 26, 1923. 
Dear Friend Al — 

Well, Old Cock, line still on the trale 
of Old Sigh Low. Ive swoarne to miself 
that Ime goin to land the old chinwhis- 
ker for a compleat plumbing and heating 
job, and wen I make up my mind to put 
ennything over — well, you know me Al. 

I tolde you of my 1st visit and as how 
I left sum catalogs & kutz & etc. with 
him beesides a cuppla nocksious wead 
torches, like the kind my friend Johnny 
Yowston of the Robberson Co. smoaks. 

Nxt. time I goes 2 sea Sigh I startz 
abt. the middl. of the p. m. When I 
gets their I walks bolddy threw the gait 
and up 2 the front dore. I nox severial 
timse but theirs no response. I finely 
went arnd. 2 to the bak, & their I scene 
an old dame climbin up the hill with a 
pale of water. 

I hurried down 2 her & sez, "Hear 
laidy let me carry that." She was 2 
suprized 2 offar enny resistns. as I tuk 
the pale frm. her. 

"Do you have to go all the weigh 
down their for water?" I sez, indycatin 
the barn yard. 

"Oh Ime ust £ it," i-he sez. "Ive bean 
doin it fer 40 yrs." 

"Forty years," I exclmd. "Why you 
musta bean a babie then." 

Honest 2 goodness she lookd abt. 90 
but its always fatel 2 tell a womman 
the trewth where her aige is concrnd. 

The old dame smiled and shook her 
hed. "A purty big one," she sez, "seen 
as I was marryed." 

"Aw gwan," I came bak, "I guess it 
jest seams like 40 yrs. Is Mr. Low 
around ? " 

"Hees down in the lower feeld, but he 
& the men will bee along for supper be- 
fore long. If you dont mind a walk 
you kin go down their if your in a 
hurry," & she pointed out to where the 
old geezer was pushin a plow abt. a % 
of a ml. away. 

"Oh lie wait," I respondz careless 
like. "Ime in no hurry." 

2 tell the honnest trewth I had come 
early on the chanct that the old boy wld. 
bee out of the weigh and I eld. get a 
slant at the old laidy. If you kin get 
the wimmen 2 yr. weigh of thinkin Vz 
the batl is 1. So I interdooced myself 
& told her all abt. the wunders of mod- 
ern plumbing & heating. 

♦'If your the gent what left them 
books hear last wk.," she sez. "Ive 
beah lookin them over — but Ime afraide 
their 2 xpensif." 



"Dont you bleeve it mother," I sez in 
my most engraishiating manor, "not 
when you figger all you get fer yer 
money. Whats the good of monney if 
you dont spend it on the comforts of 
life ? Youve got a good farm hear and lots 
of money in the bank — why not live in 




comfoit and have conveenyances like 
city fokes has?" 

"I gess your rite," sez the old dame 
with a sie, "but its hard to make my 
old man see things that way. But I 
bleeve hees thinkin abt. it tho he dont 
say nothin. When he think nobodys 
lookin he goes over thoze books you 
left last week & yesterday I see him go 
up-stairs with a yard stick & 1 of thoze 
books in his hand." 

"Good news," I xclames, "hees fallin." 

"Hees what," said the old sister look- 
in around scared-like. 

"Only an xprsn. meanin weeve got him 
goin; He betcha a slop-sink 2 a .pale 
of potatoes youll hev plumbing in hear 
in lessn a month." 

The old dame smiled but shook her 
hed. I new she felt it was 2 good 2 be 
trew. 

"Well hear he comes," she announces, 
looking down the road & sure enuff old 
whiskers & his gang were headin our 
weigh for the eyenin banquit. 

The old laidy hustled inside wile I wait- 
ed fer eld alfalfa-chin to come up and 
kick me off the lot. 



Unbenoticed to me the Heavings had 
become overclouded & while Si was still 
abt. 3 base hits off old Jupeter Polluvius 
begin to spill in rite ernest. 

This give me an xcuse to keap under 
the verandy. The hirde men hed 
switched off to the barn with the hoarses 
but Si kept rite on 2 the house. I hed 
that feeling of wonderin jest ware he 
was goin to bite me 1st, but Ide maid 
up my mind to stick like grimm dethe. 

"Good evein Mr. Low," I sez as affible 
as I eld. with a week hart. 

"Huh," he grunted. "Good evenin."' 

So far so good. He warnt goin to 
bite ennyway. 

"Goin to rain I guess," I contd. fol- 
lerin up my addvantage. 

"Purty good gesser aint you?" he come 
back a little sourcastic like. 

It was a bum remark I addmit, but 
yule agrea the conditns was tryeing. 
However he dident order me off the 
premmises so I begin to feal more at 
eeze. I watched the old geezer dip some 
water into a tin basin & then perceed to 
try and reemove a pek of dirt with a 
qt. of water. Wen he thot heed gone 
the limit he tries to dry hiself on a 
roaler towl witch hung at the side of the 
verandy but witch towl was wettern his 
faice on ac. of the rain driven in & etc. 
Wile the towl was no grate sucess at 
drieing, it did make up for the unsuf- 
ficiency of the water fer accordin to 
apeariences after Si had performed his 
absolutions their was more dirt on the 
towl than they was in the basin judgin 
by looks. 

I maid a mential note of all this in- 
tendin to use it when the propper time 
come. 

The rain hed settled down purty stiff 
& steddy and I begin to think Ide hev I 
my troubles gettin home on ac. of the 
roads & etc if I waited much longer. I 
But my currage wasnt registerin high 
enough to maik a brake for it. 

The hirde men come along in a few | 
minits & looked me over. 

"Good evenin," they sez seamin enclin- 
ed to be friendly-like & I replied in like 
manor. 

Then they went at the wash basin & i 
the wet towl. They tride to dry the | 
towl by usin some hot languidge on it ( 
but it dident do no good & they had to 
wiggle there faices like rabbits to dry 
them in the wind. 

"A shower'd go ood," I sed casual- 
like. 

"Aint we gettin enuff," sez 1 of the 



March 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



.29 




hirde men lookin up at the sky. 

"Oh I meen a showr-bath," I sez. 

"Bath 'ell — hot chanct around hear," 
sez the other feller under his voice so 
the old man who had gone inside cldnt 
here. 

I eld. smell supper cookin & bleeve me 
Al it smelt good. I begin to reelize I 
was hungriern a starved wulf. I eld. 
I heer the old man & woman inside talkin 
; in undertones, & I begins to feel cheep 
like what a feller does when the con- 
ductor asts him sudden fer his ticket & 
he can't find it. 

Finely I herd the old man say, "Bet- 
ter ast him to stay." 

With that the old lady came to the 
kitchen door and meerly sez, "I'm settin 
a plaice fer you." 

Honest to goodness Al, I felt like 
1 what someboddy had give me a wallup 
in the souler plecksus. 

I tride to murmer some xcuse but the 
old laidy was gone back into the kitchen. 

"Should I stay," I ast my inner con- 
! science of myself. "Dampfool if you 
dont," sez my inner conscience, and that 
settled it. Somethin seamed 2 tell me 
that opertunitie was nockin at the dore 
so I staid. 

It was a libberal edycation to see them 
hirde men fawl 2. The old man may hev 
a rep as a tite-wad but he new how to 
feed hirde men and the old laidy new 
how to cook it. Talk abt. eatin peeze 
with a nife, they wasn't nothin the old 
man cldnt eat with hissn. He had me 
hypnertized. 

But as time pergressed) I felt it was up 
to me to do some stunt to make up fer 
my feed. The old mans nife act had en- 
nything I eld. do backed off the map, 
J but I hev a loose tung and I know base- 
ball and when I talk baseball the gang 
has jist nactely got to lissen — you know 
me Al. I side-stepped enny ref. to plumb- 
ing but give a luminated treaties on 
I baseball as she should be played and has 
[ been played and wasnt enny more. Them 
! talks Johnny McGraw is runnin threw 
| the noosepapers is all rite in its weigh 
! but wen it comes down to intymate stuff 
McGraws not their. Does he make enny 
' ref. to you or mee in those artickles? 
You bet he doant. He nose who put base- 
ball on the map but he wants the publick 
to think its McGraw. But we know, 
dont we Al ? You bet we do. 

So I let these hicks into some of the 
inside doap and if they didnt soon tum- 
ble as to hooze hoo in baseball well it 
wasnt my fault. You know me Al. 

Well, after supper was over the stok 
; hed to be milked and fed and bedded, so 
I went down to the barn with the gang. 

It hed stopped rainen and the sun was 
just abt. winkin good nite threw some 
bloody tear-stained clouds and as their 
. was a gcod gravel walk I dident worry 
abt-. gettin my feet wet. The stock was 
holding a convention around the water 
' trowfs and 1 of the hirde men begin to 
pump. I noticed the water looked a little 
riley but he sez it was alwys like that 
after a rain. A littl of the serfice water 
alwys leeked threw. I maid annother 
mential note rite heer. 



I hed took a new brand of cigars with 
me and passed them all round after we 
was on the weigh 2 the house ag-en. They 
was good wons and even the old man no- 
ticied that fact. The old feller didnt seem 
so bad after you git to know him and 
soon I interdooced the delycate subject 
of plumbing. As he dident seem to object 
but got down on a chair in the corner 
of the verandy as if he had maid up his 
mind he mite as well lissen to the bitter 
end. 1st as finis., I was soon warmin up 
in good shape. Befoar long the hole fam- 
ily, hirde men and awl was listenin jest 
the same as wen I was talking baseball. 
Oh boy but I did put my hart in it. No 
Mother eld. hev pleeded with a judge 
over her weighward boy with greater 
ferver. The old man was unrestless at 
times as if his conscyience was trubbling 
him, especailly wen the old laidy wld. 
say,' "Oh my, Oh my." Onct the old laidy 
actlly wept. It was wen I maid refernce 
to young fokes leavin the farm. I find 
that uslly hits a soft spot in the wimmin. 
Why? Because its the trewth. 

Finely it was time to go home, and I 
thanked them fer the nice time I had and 
scd Ide call agen. I invited them all to 
pay the shop a visit wen in town and no 
oblygations 



The boys helped me start the lizzy as 
she always get a water jag on wen she 
hez been standin in the rain, but I got 
away finely, everyboddy but the old man 
wavin good by. He was busy thinkin and 
I was hopin it was plumbing he was 
thinkin of. 

I was feelin pretty good goin hoam as 
I felt that job was well on the way to be 
landed. Shure I dident hev the contrack 
in my pokt, but the spaid werk hed bean 
done. 

Wen I get time He tell you wat hap- 
pened laiter on. 

Yourse & etc., 
Jerry. 



METERS WOULD SAVE MORE 

London, Ont. — General Manager E. V. 
Buchanan of the public utilities, pointed 
out that enough money can be saved 
through the meter system, either to re- 
duce the water rate, or, after paying for 
the purchase and installation of the 
meters, within two or three years, turn 
a large annual surplus over to the city 
treasury, which would go to materially 
reduce the tax rate. 



30 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfittek 



March 1, 1923 



News Notes From Coast to Coast 



FIRE LOSS 

J. E. Rouillard, plumber, Quebec City, 
suffered fire loss. 



FORT ERIE PLUMBER LEFT LARGE 
ESTATE 

Welland, Out.— Charles E. Harris, a 
plumber of Fort Erie, whose will is filed 
for probate, left an estate of 815,500. 



NEW FIRMS 

Ramsay & Mcintosh, Limited, have 
opened up a new plumbing shop at 114 
Jarvis St., Toronto. Both Mr. Ramsay 
and Mr. Mcintosh were formerly con- 
nected with W. G. Edge, Limited, and 
carry the good wishes of all their 
friends for success in their new en- 
deavors. 



PERSONAL 

C. E. Burnett, president of The Duro 
Pump & Manufacturing Co., Dayton, 
Ohio, has just returned from a vacation 
in the Bermudas, where he enjoyed a 
complete rest for the last month. 

C. A. Kuebler, general sales manager 
and H. I. Field, Eastern sales manager 
of the Duro Pump & Manufacturing Co., 
Dayton, Ohio, are in Cuba looking after 
some of the foreign interests of the Duro 
Co. They will also conduct echo conven- 
tions throughout some of the southern 
distributing points upon their return to 
Dayton. 



THIEVES LOOT SAFE IN PLUMBING 
SHOP 

Windsor, Ont. — Gaining an entrance 
by means of a front door that had been 
left open, burglars robbed a safe in the 
office of the Edwards' Plumbing shop, 
London and Church streets, of S150. 

When the police arrived at the scene 
of the robbery they found that not only 
the front door but the door of the safe 
had been left unlocked and it was a 
simple matter for anyone to walk in 
and help themselves to the safe's con- 
tents. Whoever removed the money left 
no clue to his identity. 



STEAMFITTER MEETS FATAL 
ACCIDENT 

Toronto. — Ray Metcalfe, aged 19, died 
in the Western Hospital of a fractured 
skull as the result of falling down an 
elevator shaft at the Samuels Building, 
431 King Street, West. 

Metcalfe was a steamfitter employed 
by the Western Plumbing Company, and 
he and his helper were fixing some pipes 
on the third floor of the Samuels Build- 
ing. While the helper was absent on an 
errand, Metcalfe in some as yet unex- 
plained manner fell down the elevator 



Doings in the Plumbing and 
Heating Industry 



shaft. His body was found in the well 
in the basement. No one saw the tra- 
gedy. Metcalfe was picked up and re- 
moved to the hospital, where he died a 
short time after admittance. 



NO EXCUSE 
Hamilton, Ont. — Alex. Bonner, busi- 
ness agent of the Plumbers' and Steam- 
fitters' Union, stated that business in 
that trade is quiet at present, and that 
quite a few tradesmen are out of work. 
In view of this, he said, the reason given 
by the house owner in police court that 
he had not been able to make sanitary 
improvements ordered by the board of 
health was a very poor one. 



REPORTS BIG INCREASE IN 
BUSINESS 

W. H. Cunningham of W. H. Cunning- 
ham & Hill, Richmond St. West, To- 
ronto, stated to a Sanitary En- 
gineer representative that his com- 
pany had noted a marked increase in 
business during the past few months, 
and so far as his own company was 
concerned they had an increase of 100 
per cent, in their business during an 
eight-month period. Another indica- 
tion of returning prosperity pointed out 
by Mi\ Cunningham was that their com- 
pany when they closed their books for 
the year, reported losses from bad debts 
as amounting to $12.60. This is a most 
unusual record and is an indication of 
the soundness of the trade at this time. 

Mr. Cunningham is exceedingly op- 
timistic regarding the future in the 
plumbing trade in Canada. 



EXPERT ADVICE ON WATER 
QUESTION 

Kingston. — At the inaugural meeting 
of the Public Utilities Commission it 
was decided that first the commission 
would have to consider the question of 
water pumping. Altogether too much 
water was pumped by the Kingston sta- 
tion, the total amount being over four 
million gallons a day, or about from 175 
to 200 gallons per capita. The average 
water consumption of cities was from 
sixty-five to seventy gallons per capita. 
It cost money to pump water. The leaks 
would have to be reduced wherever they 
were. The second big question before 
the commission would be the purification 
of the water supply. This was a matter 
that would require the greatest consid- 
eration and the advice to the commission 
was to not be stampeded into doing any- 
thing without the fullest information. 
The best expert advice was needed. 



LEAVE TAPS RUNNING ALL NIGHT 

Montreal. — While it is impossible to 
judge accurately the amount of extra 
water being thus consumed, much extra 
pumping has been required in Montreal 
this winter on account of people leaving 
their taps running all night long to avoid 
freezing. It is estimated that as many 
as 30,000 taps are open at night. Such 
a large flow of water increases the de- 
mand on the pumping service with the 
result that the winter peak has on oc- 
casions been higher than the summer 
peak. 



PUMPS FORCED TO DO MUCH UN- 
NECESSARY WORK 

Montreal. — Local waterworks officials 
puzzled for a week over the mysterious 
reduction in the level of water at the 
McTavish Street reservoir where a drop 
of over four feet had taken place some ; 
days ago and had been maintained, with 
the result that the pumps were forced j 
to do extra work to keep up the neces- ! 
sary supply. On investigating it was 
found that the twelve-inch pipe which 
serves this street had broken. There 
was no evidence on the surface to indi- i 
cate any leak, it being found that the 
escaping water, instead of forcing its 
way upward to the street, had found 1 
a weak point in the brick sewer and had 
been flowing into it, thus draining much ! 
of the reservoir reserve. 



WATER PIPED THROUGH TREE 
TRUNKS 

Relics of ancient water pipes, consist- 
ing of the hollow truuks of very fine elm 
trees were recently dug up in London. 
These wooden conduits, although thy had 
ben laid down more than two hundred 
years ago, were still in a wonderful state 
of preservation. Up to the early part of 
last century the New River Company 
had laid several hundred of miles of 
wooden pipes. But they needed so much 
attention and repairing that they were 
replaced by iron piping at a cost of 300,- 
000 pounds. Another advantage of the 
change was that whereas the tree trunks 
had a bore of a few inches only, the 
metal substitutes measured several feet 
across. Consequently a much greater vol- 
ume of water was obtainable. In those 
days the water for London came either 
from the waterworks at London Bridge 
or from those of the New River Com- 
pany. Before this, the water was ob- 
tained from the Thames or the springs 
which arise in the elevated ground on 
the north or west of the city. It was con- 
veyed by means of earthern or leaden 
pipes to different conduits or fountains 
erected to receive it. 



March 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



Waterworks Men Discuss Water Purification 

Delegates to Meeting of American Water Works 
Association in Toronto Consider Violet Ray and 
Other Means of Purifying Water 



SOME 150 delegates, including a num- 
ber from Quebec and the United 
States, registered at the mid-winter 
meeting of the Canadian Section, Amer- 
ican Water Works Association, in the 
Carls-Rite Hotel, Toronto. In the ab- 
sence of Mayor Maguire, the convention 
was welcomed at its luncheon by Com- 
missioner of Works R. C. Harris. 

In extending the official welcome of 
the city, Mayor Maguire took occasion 
to comment ( upon the purity of Toronto 
water since the installation of a filtra- 
tion plant. He recognized the responsi- 
bility which devolved upon them in 
guarding- the public health of their re- 
spective municipalities. 

With the liberal use of charts and 
blackboards, different speakers dis- 
cussed water works problems. Prof. R. 
W. Angus, of the University of Toronto, 
read a scholarly paper upon intakes, 
drawing upon his extensive experience in 
laboratory work. F. A. Dallyn, provin- 
cial sanitary engineer, contributed a 
paper which dealt with the preparation 
of water for filtration. He weighed the 
comparative merits of various chemicals 
in destroying what he termed "the bac- 
teriological efficiency of water." 

Some discussion centred about a re- 
: cent act which requires firms equipped 
with the sprinkler system to have dual 
checks between the private system and 
the main. The reason advanced for such 
legislation was that water frequently 
remained in the firm's tank for lengthy 
periods, and, on getting back into the 
main, contaminated the city water sup- 
, ply. Several members thought that an 
unnecessary inconvenience was being oc- 
casioned the firms. 
Quite an extensive exhibit of equip- 
i ment and chemicals employed in water 
works systems was situated on the same 
floor. Of interest, as marking the in- 
novation in Canada of the preparation of 
liquid chlorine, was a huge cylinder con- 
tainer of that deadly gas. It was being- 
used in that form for the chlorination of 
water in preference to chloride of lime, 
as the latter contains only about 35 per- 
cent, chlorine. 

The officers of the Canadian section 
are: Chairman, R. L. Dobbin, Peterboro, 
who presided; vice-president, F. A. Dal- 
lyn, Toronto; trustees, R. H. Starr of 
Orillia, N. R. Wilson of Brantford, and 
James J. Salmond of Toronto. The sec- 
retary-treasurer is C. D. Brown of Walk- 
erville, Ont. 

Members spent a profitable hour or 
two in a discussion of the methods of 
purifying- public water supplies. The 
discussion was based on the paper re- 
cently prepared by Norman J. Howard, 
bacteriologist in charge of the Toronto 
filtration plant. The paper dealt in de- 
tail with various methods, such as sedi- 



mentation or storage, slow sand filtra- 
tion, mechanical or rapid sand filtration 
and sterilization. Under the last head 
the reagent properties of chlorine, ozone 
and violet rays were discussed. 

The treatment by violet rays was stat- 
ed to be very effective but rather costly. 
The treatment consists in the exposure 
of the water to the rays from an electric 
mercury vapor lamp with walls of 
quartz. Exposure. to the rays not only 
kills bacteria, but imparts a potential 
sterilizing power which kills bacteria 
subsequently encountered. This method 
has not been found practical for very 
large plants, however. 

In the discussion members from dif- 
ferent parts of the Dominion gave their 
views on the different processes and the 
general trend of the discussion showed 
that no particular system could be 
singled out for special commendation, as 
the question resolved itself into one that 
was dependent on the different elements 



SEPTIC TANKS DISAPPEARING 
IN ST. JOHN 

St. John, N. B. — Septic tanks and cess- 
pools will soon become a thing of the 
past in St. John, N. B., as the whole area 
is rapidly being linked up with the 
sewerage system. Splendid progress is 
being made with a new trunk sewer, and 
owing to the nature of the soil, the com- 
missioner of water and sewerage states 
that headway is made much more rapid- 
ly during the cold weather, as the frost 
in the ground does away with the- neces- 
sity of lining the trench with timber to 
keep it from caving in, thereby lessen- 
ing the expense considerably. 



He phoned his fiancee, aged twenty- 
four, that he was sending her a rose 
for every year of her age. To the 
florist he gave the order to send the 
lady two dozen of the finest roses he 
could procure. 

"He is a very good customer," re- 
marked the florist to his assistant who' 
was packing the bouquet, "so put in an 
extra half dozen." 

That is how the engagement was 
wrecked. 



Fred Holliday is Appointed 

Advertising Manager of 

"Sanitary Engineer" 

Also other additions to the staff 

SANITARY ENGINEER, Plumber and Steamfitter of 
Canada is glad to announce the appointment of Fred 
Holliday as Advertising Manager. 
Mr. Holliday has had many years' advertising experience, 
particularly in connection with lines closely allied with fields 
served by this paper. Mr. Holliday has also had wide ex- 
perience in publication work, having been connected with 
publications such as Construction, Western Canada Contractor 
and other well known publications. The coming of Mr. 
Holliday to Sanitary Engineer Advertising Department will 
add strength to an already strong department. 

Mr. B. C. Culley has been appointed advertising represen- 
tative in Montreal. Mr. Culley has had considerable exper- 
ience in trade publication work with the MacLean organiza- 
tion. 

Mr. O. T. Martin with four years' editorial experience, has 
been appointed to the editorial staff of Sanitary Engineer at 
the Montreal branch and will cover the City of Montreal and 
Quebec province. 

Mr. F. R. McKinley has recently been added to the 
Editorial staff at the Toronto office. Mr. McKinley is well 
known among the trade, having done business with many 
firms when in business in Parry Sound. 

The next issue, March 15, will carry several new features, 
and in the April 1 issue an announcement of unusual in- 
terest will appear regarding a new editorial development of 
Sanitary Engineer. 



32 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 1, 1U2.J 



Market Conditions and Tendencies 



Price Trend on Sanitary and 
Heating Supplies 



Markets at a Glance 



HEAVY price changes feature the local mar- 
kets for this week. Many of the changes 
have been forecasts in recent reports from 
primary market sources, but the upward trend of 
prices has spread to other branches of the trade 
and higher quotations have resulted. 

The latest advances include 3i/ 3 % on enameled 
goods which are now quoted at list less 30% 
whereas formerly the discount was 33Vi$%, an ad- 
vance of about 10% on galvanized sheets. Sap 
buckets and blow torches, as well as a further ad- 
vance of about 10% on galvanized sheets. Scrap 
materials have firmed up locally, new quotations 



being from 5% to 15% higher on carlot quantities 
and further developments are said to be the pos- 
sibility in cotton and tin goods. 

The advance in solder noted, is the result of 
several raises in price which have occurred in tin 
and lead at primary sources, the new quotations 
are being rigidly maintained. 

The recent optimistic feeling evident in local 
trade circles is being borne out by business ac- 
tivity, evidences of which are to be seen daily. 
Reports indicate a substantial increase in volume of 
business over last year will be reached. 



Montreal Markets 

MONTREAL, Feb. 26: — The upward tendency of the market is 
reflected in recent price revisions in several lines, while in a 
number of others where the quotations remain unchanged 
there are indications of an upward revision in the near future. 'One of 
the most important changes noted is the revision in discount on enam- 
eled wares where a 3!/3 per cent, change has taken place, the new 
discount being 30 per cent, as compared with the previous discount of 
331/3 per cent. Zinc and lead products have undergone a general re- 
vision, all solders increasing one cent per pound and lead pipe and 
waste advancing half a cent. A slight upward change has also 
been announced in copper and brass scrap. Sheets are expected to 
advance at the end of the week, a twenty-five cent advance having 
already been made in Queen's Head and Fleur de Lis lines of 
English galvanized. 



SLIGHT ADVANCE IS QUOTED ON 
ENAMELED WARE 

Montreal. 

Enameled ware has taken a slight ad- 
vance during the past week, discounts 
now being quoted at 30 per cent., where- 
as the former discount was 33 1-3 per 
cent. Spring trading has not yet opened 
up to any appreciable extent but early 
season sales are maintaining a firm un- 
dertone. The present quotations are as 
follows: 

ENAMELED WARE — 

Sinks, roll rim — 

18 x SO $23 00 

Sinks, flat rim — 1 only 2 only 8 only 

16 x 24 $ 7 60 $ 7 40 $ 7 30 

18 x 30 8 70 8 60 8 50 

20 x 30 9 90 9 80 9 70 

Bath tubs, roll rim, 4. 4%, 6 feet, 24 to 
30 in. wide 61 40 

Bath tubs, 6% feet 67 10 

Lavatories — 

17x19 in. Apron F139 or P4045 15 30 

18x24 In. Apron F164 or P3845 or P3847 23 60 

18x21 In. Apron F169 or P4205 17 60 

17x19 In. Roll rim. F241 or P4345 12 60 

Less 30 per cent. 



FIRM MARKET MAINITAINED IN 
SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS 

Montreal. 

Although sales are affected by the off 
season, local manufacturers report a 
satisfactory state of affairs so far as 
soil pipe and fittings are concerned. Ris- 
ing productive costs have given the mar- 
ket a strong undertone and the prices 
quoted recently are maintained without 
difficulty. The quotations at present are 
as follows: 
SOIL PIPE— 

2 and 3 inch 35% 

4 inch 35% 

5 and 6 inch 35% 

8 inch net 

PITTINGS— 

2 to 6 inch 45% 

8 inch , net 



TRADING REPORTED LIGHT IN 
CLOSET COMBINATIONS 

Montreal. 

Quotations on closet combinations, 
bowls, seats and tanks remain unchang- 
ed at recent decreased revisions. Trad- 
ing on the local market is not heavy 



as yet but indications point to a success- 
ful season with trading brisk within the 
next few weeks. Current quotations are 
as follows: 

closet combinations- 
low Down Outfits, each 

Closet, standard outfit, oak 24 00 

Do., post hinge seat 25 00 

Do., oak vitro or Pussyfoot 24 00 

Do., post hinge seat 25 00 

Do., mahogany vitro or Pussyfoot, post 

hinge seat and cover 27 45 

Do., vitreous china, oak post hinge seat 

and cover 28 45 

Do., vitreous china. mahogany post 

hinge seat and cover 29 00 

Do., white vitro or Pussyfoot, mahogany 

post hinge seat and cover 27 50 

Do., enamelled iron tan.:, , ak post 

hinge seat and cover 29 50 

Do., enamelled iron tank, mahogany 

post hinge seat and cover 29 50 

Add for %" valve on supply pipe i 25 

Add for spud 60 

Add for reverse trap bowl 1 oO 

Add for syphon jet bowl 7 00 

Deduct for supply pipe 80 

Deduct for floor hinge 60 

CLOSET BOWLS— 

Riche'-'eu bowl ? 00 

Washdown bowl with spud 9 50 

Reverse trap bowl with spud 9 50 

Syphon jet bowl with spud 15 00 

CLOSET SEATS— 

Oak post hinge seat and cover 3 85 

Oak wood strip seat and cover 3 50 

Mahogany finish post hinge seat and cover 4 05 

closet tanks- 
Low down, oak vitro or Pussyfoot with 

fittings less seat 13 20 

White vitro or Pussyfoot with fittings, 

flush elbow and supply 15 65 

Vitreous china tank with fittings, flush 

elbow and supply 18 00 

Enamelled iron with fittings, flush elbow 

and supply 18 00 



FURTHER UPWARD REVISION IN 
LEAD PRODUCTS 

Montreal. 

Lead and zinc products have shown a 
generally upward tendency of late, a 
more or -less general price revision hav- 
ing been experienced. Solders, both bar 
and wire, are advanced one cent per 1 
pound, this making the second increase 
in the past three weeks. Lead pipe and 
waste are one-half cent higher, while 



March 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



33 



lead sheets in all weights show a cor- 
responding tendency. Metals on primary 
markets are very firm, prices of lead 
and tin being again on the climb. Re- 
vised quotations on the finished products 
are as follows: |j 

LEAD AND ZINC PRODUCTS — 

Lead pipe, per 100 lbs., up to 2" 14 00 

Do., 2" to 8" 15 00 

Do., 8" and over 16 00 

Lead waste, per 100 lbs 15 00 

Note — Lead pipe is subject to a discount of 10%. 

Lead traps and bends 15% 

Lead wool, lb 14'/ 2 

Lead sheets, 2% lbs., sq. ft. lb 12 

Lead sheets, 3 to 3% lbs., sq. ft. lb... lll% 

Do., 4 to 8 lbs., sq. ft. lb 11 

Cut sheets, Vic. lb. extra and cut sheets 
to size, %c. lb. extra. 

Solder, guaranteed, lb 28 

Do., strictly, lb 25 

Do., commercial 24 

Do., wiping, lb 24 

Do., wire, lb 38% 

Zinc, sheets, casks 011 

Do., broken lots 12 



ASBESTOS PRODUCTS PROMISE 
SPRING ACTIVITY 

Montreal. ' 

The local asbestos products market is 
quiet at present, little new business be- 
ing offered and dealers well caught up 
with orders on hand. Inquiries being re- 
ceived, however, indicate that the lat- 
ter part of March will see the opening 
of a brisk spring business which will! 
reach its full development in April. Prices 
being quoted show no change during re- 
cent weeks, current quotations being as 
follows: 

ASBESTOS PRODUCTS— 

Off list prices 

2 ply pipe covering 57%% 

3 ply pipe covering 55% 

4 ply pipe covering 50% 

85% magnesia 40% 

Per b?.o 

Boiler covering $1 50 

Per 100 lbs 

Asbestos sheathing 7 75 8 25 



BOILER TUBE QUOTATIONS SHOW 
NO CHANGES 

Montreal. 

Movement of boiler tubes shows a 
slight improvement and will continue to 
do so as the season advances. There has 
been no revision of prices since higher 
prices were quoted earlier in the month, 
although there is a slight intimation in 
some sources that another small advance 
is not out of the question. The quota- 
tions at present are as follows: 

BOILER TUBES— 

Seamless Lapweld 

t inch 20 00 .... 

1% inch 22 00 

1% inch 21 00 .... 

1% inch 24 50 24 00 

2 inch 21 50 20 00 

2% inch 24 50 23 00 

2 inch 29 00 24 50 

3 inch 34 00 31 00 

3V 2 inch 39 50 35 50 

4 inch 50 00 45 00 

Prices, per 100 ft., f.o.b. Montreal. 



COTTON WASTES CONTINUE ON 
FIRM BASIS 

Montreal. — 

Market quotations on cotton waste 
still remain at the January revision on 
the local market with a firm undertone 
to the market. It had been expected in 
some quarters that an upward revision 
would take place on March 1, but the lo- 
cal situation does not warrant the 
change at the present time, although 



there is little doubt but that it will 
come within a few weeks' time. In the 
meantime quotations remain as follows: 

COTTON WASTES— Per lb. 

Cream polishing 21 

White, XXX extra 18 

White. XX grand 17 

White XLCR 16 

X Empire 14% 

X Press o 13 

Colored — 

Fancy o 15 

Lion 13% 

Standard 12 

Popular ■ o 10 

Keen o 08 

Wool Packing — 

Arrow 25 

Axle o 21 

Anvil 17 

Dominion Wipers — 

White cotton 18 

Colored cotton 13 



NO CHANGE IN QUOTATIONS ON 
RANGE BOILERS 

Montreal. — 

There is no change in the quotations 
on range boilers, the market having re- 
mained stationary for some time now. 
Trading is described as not particularly 
heavy with a firmer trend anticipated in 
the very near future. List prices and dis- 
counts are as follows: 
RANGE BOILERS:— 

5 Gallon $13.50 

12 " 14.00 

18 " 15.00 

25 " 16.50 

30 " 17.60 

35 " 20.50 

40 " 22.75 

52 " 38.00 

66 " 60.76 

82 " 74.00 

100 " 103.00 

] 20 *' 117.00 

14 * " 164.00 

16 l " 187.00 

' 9Z " 210.00 

Std., less 40 per cent. : Ex. Heavy, 30 per cent. 



STRENGTHENING TENDENCY IN 
COPPER SCRAP 

Montreal. — 

A firmer tone is noticed in practically 
all lines in the scrap materials market, 
copper and brass waste showing a slight 
increase during the past two weeks. 
Rubber scrap is firm at recent advances 
and iron and steel is improved, although 
nominal quotations are unchanged. Av- 
erage buying prices of local dealers are: 
SCRAP MATERIALS— 

Automobile tires 60 

Rubber shoes 03 

Yellow brass O 05% to 06 

Red brass 09 

Light brass 04% 

Scrap zinc 04% 

Lead, heavy 05 

Lead, tea 03 

Light copper 08% to 09 

Heavy copper 11% 

Wrought iron, R. Rd., No. 1, per gr. ton 12 00 

Malleable scrap (ton) 9 00 to 10 00 

Pipe scrap (ton) 7 00 

Heavy melting steel 9 00 9 50 

No. 2 busheling 3 00 

Bciler plate i 00 to fl 00 

No. 1 machinery cast 20 00 to 22 00 



FIRM TONE MAINTAINED IN PIPE 
FITTINGS MARKETS 

Montreal. — 

Trading in pipe fittings continues with 
a firm tone which may have a tendency 
towards increased price within a very 
short while, labor and fuel troubles mak- 
ing delivery uncertain at present. In the 
meantime, there is no change in the quo- 



tations on the local market, they being 
as follows: 

PIPE FITTINGS — 

Cast iron fittings 22% 

Plugs, cast iron 22% 

Do., solid 22% 

Do., countersunk 22% 

Bushings, cast 25% 

Do., malleable 25% 

Unions 40% 

Flanged unions 22% 

Flanged fittings 27%% 

Dart unions, black, % to 2 in 331-3% 

Do., % in., 2% in., and larger 23% 

Do., galv. add to black 30% 

Nipples, % to 4", close and short 50% 

Do., long 55% 

Do., 4% to 8", close and short 40% 

Do., long 45% 

Couplings, 4" and under 25% 

Do., 4%" and larger 6% 

Malleable Fittings — 

Piece list effective June 1st, 1922. Discoun* 
68 per cent. 



NO CHANGES ARE RECORDED IN 
COMPRESSION GOODS 

Montreal. — 

There have been no changes in the 
price of compression goods since the last 
lists issued but with the upward tenden- 
cy of the primary markets, there is some 
likelihood that an upward revision may 
result shortly. Present quotations are as 
follows: 

VALVES AND BIBBS— 

Compression work, standard 45% 

Fuller work, standard 30% 

Quick opening compression bibbs 43% 

Bath cocks, quick opening 41% 

Bath cocks, compression 41% 

Basin cocks, quick opening 46% 

Flatway stop and waste cocks, standard 56% 
Roundway stop and waste cocks, standard 56% 

Brass steam cocks, standard, % in 50% 

Radiator valves, standard 55/25% 

Do., removable discs 55/25% 

Globe, angle and check valves, standard 25% 

Gate or straightway 25% 

Emco globe valves 33.% 

Emco check valves 33% 

Jenkins globe, angle, check and swing 

check 10% 

Jenkins gate or straightway 16% 

Jenkins iron body, globe and angle . . . . 15% 

Jenkins iron body, gate 25% 

N P. "O" and "S" traps 40% 



RADIATION PRODUCTS STEADY AT 
REVISED DISCOUNTS 

Montreal. — 

Radiation quotations remain unchang- 
ed from the last listing. There has been 
a continued firm undertone in these pro- 
ducts. The following are the prevailing 
quotations: 

RADIATOR'S AND BOILERS — 

Radiator list prices are for 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 
column radiators, per sq. ft. 

45 in. to 38 in.. $1; 32 in., $1.10; 30 in., $1.15; 
26 in., $1.20; 23 in, $1.26; 22 in., $1.30; 20 in., 
$1.36; 18 in., $1.40; 16 in., $1.50; 14 in.. $1.55; 
13 in., $1.60. Discount 51 per cent for hot 
water, and 52 per cent for steam. 

Wall radiators— 5 ft., $1.15 ; 6 ft., $1.10; 7 ft., 
$1.05; 9 ft., $1.05; 12 ft., $1.05; Discount 48 
per cent. 

Boilers — Roulnd hvt water boilers, sizes from 0> 
to 10, 60 per cent, off list. Square or sectional 
hot water or steam boilers, 15 in., 15 per cent. 
Square or sectional water boilers, 19 in. to 36 
in.. 20 per cent. Square or sectional steam boil- 
ers, 19 in., to 36 in 17 per cent. Ontario Gov- 
erment trimmings, 15 per cent. 

Round steam boilers, standard trimmings, 28 
per cent. Ontario Government trimmings, 25 per 
cent. 

F.o.b. Montreal. Toronto. Guelph. 



CEMENT QUOTATIONS REMAINING 
AT RECENT REVISION 

Montreal. — 

While cement sales to-day are merely 
nominal, to remain so until the opening 
of the spring building season, local man- 
ufacturers declare sales to be of good 



34 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 1, 1923 



proportion. There has been no change in 
price since the six-cent drop of some 
time ago. Present quotations are as fol- 
lows: | 

CEMENT — ~ 

Gar load lots, per bag. F.o.b. steam cars 86 

Per Bag, delivered 94 

Less car lots, per bag, f.o.b. yard — 

Per bag, delivered 94 

Less 5 per cent 1 04 

Rebate of 20 cents for empty bags. 



SAP BUCKETS SHOW REVISION IN 
AN UPWARD DIRECTION 

Montreal. 

A revision has taken place in the 
prices of sap buckets on the local mar- 
ket, an increase being made in all buck- 
et prices. There has been no change in 
square syrup cans and spouts. Trading 
in the local market has been fairly good. 
The following are the new prices: 

SAP BUCKETS— 

Straight Pattern— Per 100, No. 7, $16.10; No. 
8, S17.50; No. 9. $19.60; No. 12. S21.00 ; No. 16, 
525.20. 

Extra Heavy— No. 12, $25.90 : No. 16. S31.50. 
Frontenac — 10 qt., $22.19. 

Western Pattern— 6 qt.. £15.75 ; 10 qt., $21.00. 

Galvanized Straight — No. 9, $23.00; No. 10, 
$27.00; No. 12. $27.00; No. 16, S31.00. 

Square Syrup Cans, one gallon, $16.75 per 
hundred. 

Spouts— Perfection. $20.00; Eureka, $17.00; 
Sterling, $24.65 in lots of 1000. 



ENGLISH GALVANIZED SHEETS 
ARE ADVANCED 

Mon rcnl 

A 25-cer.t advance is announced in 
English galvanized sheets, the price hav- 
ing been increased by the makers in 
England. The new quotations on Queen's 
Head and Fleur de Lis, respectively, are 
as follows: 28 gauge, $7.50 and $7.25; 
26 gauge, $7.25 and $7.00; 24 gauge, 
$6.95 and $6.70; 22 gauge, $6.90 and 
S6.65; 18-20 gauge, $6.65 and $6.40. 



ADVANCED PRICES GENERAL IN 
METAL MARKETS 

Montreal. — 

The metal market remains firm with 
tin and copper especially strong and the 



SOLDERING COPPERS ARE AT 
OLD LIST 

To-nnto. 

There has been no change in the price 
on soldering coppers. The rising prices 
of ingot copper, however, are expected 
to have an effect on quotations on this 
line in the near future. 

COPPERS. SOLDERING— 

Base 4 to 8 lbs., 35c. per lb.; 3-lb., 38c; 2 1 i-lb. 
41c; 1%-lb. 44c; 1-lb. 48c. per lb. 

F.o.b. Toronto. Hamilton. 



former has shown a very sharp advance. 
The advance is a little too rapid to be 
healthy and while the situation is un- 
doubtedly firm, a reaction temporarily 
would not be surprising. 

TIN. — The London market registered 
a new high level on this movement of 
£210 with New York on an equal basis. 
Speculation is quite active and consum- 
ers are naturally a little chary about 
buying at present prices. The local mar- 
ket is firm at 51 cents. 

COPPER. — This is also very firm in 
London and New York and with buyers 
bidding against one another the market 
has been forced up considerably. It is 
difficult to buy at less than 17 cents re- 
finery for electro. The local market is 
also firm at 20V2 cents for electro and 
20 cents for casting. 

SPELTER. — This is also very firm in 
both London and U. S. A. and East St. 
Louis has touched a new high point at 
7.70 cents. The situation appears strong 
at the moment and with stocks not very 
large a firm market may be expected for 
the next few months. The local market is 
firm at 10% cents. 

LEAD. — This remains steady with lit- 
tle change in prices and it is probable 
that there will not be much advance 
from present levels. The situation re- 
mains firm, however, with supplies none 
too plentiful. The local market is firm 
at 9 cents. 

ANTIMONY.— The is very firm ow- 
ing to lack of offerings from China and 
there is a keen demand for the little 
available. The local market is higher 
at 8 J /4 cents for English and 7% cents 
for Chinese. 

ALUMINIUM. — This is also firmer in 
tone and the market has advanced to 24 
cents per lb. 



ENAMELED WARE PRICES . 
ADVANCED 

Toronto. 

The discount on enameled ware has 
been reduced from 33 1-3% to 30% as a 
result of higher prices on basic metals, 
and the continued firmness noted in pri- 
mary sources. The advance, while not 
large, affects the complete range of en- 
ameled goods including baths, basins, 



sinks and backs. Following is the list 
with the new discount now in effect. 



ENAMELED WARE— 

Enameled Iron Baths, 3" roll rim, 4 ft,. 

4 ft. 6 in., 6 ft . . 61 40 

Do., 6% ft 67 10 

Lavatories — 

17x10" Apron F139 or P4045 15 30 

18x24" Apron F154 or P3845 or P3847 23 60 

18x21" Apron F169 or P4206 17 60 

18x21" Roll Rim, F197, F199 or 

P4656-6 16 40 

17x19" Roll Rim, F241 or P4345 12 60 

Sinks, Roll Rim, 16x24 in 18 10 

Do., 18 x 30 in 23 00 

Do., 20 x 30 in 24 70 

Sinks, Flat Rim— 3 only 2 only 1 only 

16x24 f7 60 $7 70 *7 80 

18x30 8 50 8 60 8 70 

20x30 9 70 9 80 9 90 



Above prices, list less 30 per cent. 



LEAD AND ZINC GOODS PRICES 
RISE 

Toronto. 

The steady advances in tin and lead 
prices have been reflected in quotations 
on solder. This is the second advance 
within a month and it is stated that the 
present levels will be well maintained in 
view of present primary market condi- 



tions. The new list follows: 
LEAD AND ZINC GOODS — 

Lead pipe, per 100 lbs., up to 2" 14 50 

Do., 2" to 8" 15 50 

Do, 8" and over 16 50 

Lead waste, per 100 lbs 15 50 

Note — Lead pipe is subject to a discount of 10 

per cent. 

Lead traps and bends 15% 

Lead wool, lb 14% 

Lead sheets, 2% lbs. sq. ft. per lb 12% 

Lead sheets, 3 to 3% lbs 11% 

Do., 4 to 8 lbs., sq. ft. lb 11% 

Do., 4 to 8 lbs. sq. ft. lb 11% 

Solder, guaranteed, lb 29 

Do., strictly, lb 26 

Do., commercial, lb 25 

Do,, wiping, lb 25 

Do., wire, lb 39% 

Zinc sheets, casks 11 

Do., broken lots : 0»12 



GALVANIZED SHEETS AGAIN 
ADVANCED 

Toronto. 

Galvanized sheet prices are again re- 
vised to higher levels. The steadily ad- 
vancing prices at the mills and the 1 
scarcity of foreign sheets have caused 
local quotations to be adjusted to meet 
the new levels. It is pointed out that 
further advances may be looked for, if | 
basic prices go any higher. The prices j 
now in effect follow: 

GALVANIZED SHEETS- 

Premier and Apollo 

10% oz 6 65 7 00 

U. S. 28 base 6 50 

U. S. 26 base 6 20 

22 and 24 6 05 

18 and 20 \ . 5 90 

16 5 75 II 

12 and 14 5 60 

Queen's Head 

28 gauge base 7 15 7 50 

26 6 75 7 10 -' I 

24 6 45 6 90 

22 6 30 6 70 

Fleur de Lis 

28 gauge, base 6 90 

26 6 50 

24 6 20 

22 6 06 XI 

An extra 40c. per 100 lbs. is charged for Key- 
stone and Premier bands copper-bearing sheets. 

An extra is now charged on galvanized sheets. 
10% oz. and 28 ga., when shipped out in sheets 
3 feet wide. The extra charged over prices shown 
in 20c. per 100 pounds. 



FIRM TONE MAINTAINED IN SOIL 
PIPE PRICES 

Toronto. 

Increasing business in the soil pipe 
trade is reported in local circles. Prices 
have remained unchanged but dealers 



Toronto Markets 

TORONTO, March 1. — There are several important price changes 
noted in this week's market reports, all of which are in the up- 
ward direction. Among the more important are the new dis- 
counts on enameled goods, the advanced price on sap buckets, new 
higher lists on blow torches and the advance in copper rivets and 
burrs. Galvanized sheets are also quoted at higher prices. 

The continued activity of primary markets has kept quotations in 
an uncertain state, particularly in ingot metals, iron, steel and sheet 
metal. Many dealers being afraid to quote definite prices, not know- 
ing what replacement figures will be. This feeling is offset to some 
extent by the feeling that a wave of prosperity is at hand and that 
even if higher prices are reached, goods could be readily disposed of 
without loss. 



March 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



35 



state that advances in price are war- 
ranted in view of the rising prices of 
raw materials. 
KANGE BOILERS — 
Size. List Price. 

f,-Kiillon $13 60 

12 to IB gallon 14 00 

IB-gallon 15 00 

26-gallon 16 60 

30-u:illon 17 60 

35-gallon 20 50 

40-gallon 22 76 

62-eallon 38 00 

BU-Kallon 60 75 

K2-Biil!on 74 00 

100-gailon 103 CO 

120-gallon 117 00 

144-sallon 164 00 

168-eallon 187 00 

192-gallon 210 00 

Discounts, Standard weight, 40 per cent. 
Extra heavy, 30 per cent. 



WROUGHT PIPE PRICES REMAIN 
UNCHANGED 

Toronto. 

There has been no further change in 
the quotations on wrought pipe since the 
recent upward revision. Sales are grad- 
ually taking on larger proportions at the 
list following. Local dealers assert that 
they are looking for an active season's 
business in pipe. 

WROUGHT PIPE 
Price List No. 57. February, 1922. 

Standard Buttweld Pipe S/C 

Steel Gen. Wrot. Iron 
Blk. Galv. Flk. Galv. 

Size 

V 8 in 6.00 8.00 

Yi in 4.14 6.12 7.38 9.42 

% in 4.14 6.12 7.38 9.42 

y, in 5.27 6.72 7.57 9.10 

% in 6.44 8.05 9.20 10.93 

1 in 9.18 11.56 1326 15.81 

1% in 12.42 15 64 17.94 21.39 

iy> in 14.85 18.70 21.45 25.68 

2 in 19.38 25.16 28.86 34.41 

2Y> in 31.59 39.78 

3 in 41.31 52.02 

3V> in 53 36. 66.24 

4 " in 63.22 78.48 

Standard Lapweld Pipe S/C 
Per 100 feet. 

Steel Gen. Wrot. Iron 
Blk. Galv. Blk. Galv. 

Size 

2 in 23.31 28.49 32.19 37.74 

2Y" in 34.52 42.71 48.56 57.33 

3 in 45.14 55.85 63.50 74.97 

31/, in 54.28 67.16 76.36 90.16 

4 in 64.31 79.57 90.47 106.82 

iYi in 74.93 92.71 110.00 1.30 

5 in 87.32 108.04 1.29 1.51 

6 in 1.13 1.40 1.67 1.96 

7 in 1.48 1.83 2.14 2.55 

8L in 1.55 1.93 2.25 2.68 

8 in 1.79 2.22 2.59 3.08 

9 in 2.17 2.69 

10L in 2.02 2.50 2.91 3.46 

10 in 2.60 3.21 3.75 4.45 



LARGER BUSINESS IN SOIL PIPE 

Toronto. 

Soil pipe and fittings are becoming 
active in local trade circles. There is no 
change in price since the recent adjust- 
ment. Discounts in effect follow: 

SOIL PIPE— 

2 inch Less 33 1-3% 

3 inch Less 33 1-3% 

4 inch Less 33 1-3% 

5 and 6 inch Less 33 1-3% 

8 inch net 

FITTINGS — ' 

8 inch fittings net. 

2 to 6 inch Less 45 per cent. 



CLOSET COMBINATIONS AND 
BOWLS REMAIN UNCHANGED 

Toronto. 

No changes are reported in the prices 
governing closet combinations, bowls, 
tanks and seats. Local trade in these 
lines is said to be moderately good and 
in excess of last season. The recent re- 



duction in price in closet combinations 
and tanks has been adopted in outside 
markets corresponding with the recently 
revised list given below. 

CLOSET COMBINATIONS— Each 
Oak, Wood Tank, Oak W. S. Seat and Cover 24 00 
Oak Vitro Tank, Oak W.S. .Seat and Cover 24 'Ju 

Oak Pi fr.yfoot Tank, Oak W S. Seat and 

C-.ver 24 00 

Oak Wood Tank Oak P.H., feat and Cov'r 24 50 
Oak Vitro Tank. Oak P.H. Scat and Cover 21 50 
White Vitro Oak Woodstrip Seat and Cover 24 60 
White, Pussyfoot Oak Woodstlip, Seat and 

Cover 25 50 

White Pussyfoot, Woodstrip Seat and Cover 25 50 
White Vitro Tank, Malhog., P.H. Seat and 

Cover : 26 50 

White Pussyfoot, Mahog., P.H. Seat and 

Cover 26 50 

White Vitro or Pussyfoot, oak, P.H. Seat 

and Cover 26 00 

Mahog. Pussyfoot, Mahogany P.H., Seat and 

Cover 27 00 

Vitreous China Tank, Oak P.H., Seat and 

Cover 27 00 

Enam. Iron Tank. Oak P.H. Seat and Cover 28 75 
Vitreous China Tank, Mahog., P.H. Seat 

and Cover 29 00 

Enam. Iron Tank, Mahog., P.H., Seat and 

Cover 28 75 

ADDITIONS OR REDUCTIONS ON ABOVE— 
If supplied less bend or offset, deduct. . 50 
If supplied with reverse trap bowl, add 1 50 
If supplied with BOT Reverse Trap bowl 

Add 2 25 

If supplied with plain syphon jet bowl 

Add 7 00 

If supplied with N.P. stock cock on sup- 
ply Pipe, Add 1 50 

If supplied less brass and rubber floor 

flange and bolts. Deduct 60 

If supplied less bend or offset, deduct. . 50 
If supplied less N. P. supply pipe deduct 70 
CLOSET BOWLS— 

Washdown bowl with spud 10 60 

Reverse trap bowl, with spud 12 10 

Syphon jet bowl, with spud 17 00 

"Richelieu" bowl 10 50 

CLOSET TANKS— LOW DOWN — 

Oak wood, Tank and inside fittings with 

bend and supply 13 20 

Mahog. Wood Tank, and inside Fittings 

with bend and supply 15 40 

Oak Vitro or Pussyfoot Tank and inside 

Fittings with bend and supply 13 45 

White Vitro or Pussyfoot Tank and Inside 

Fittings with bend and supply 3 3 40 

White Enam. Tank F.-585 or P. 9262, or 

White Vitreous China Belmeade Tank 

with fittings (as above) 18 00 

CLOSET SEATS— 

Oak Rich. Seat and Cover to wall 3 50 

Oak Woodstrip Seat and Cover with bolts 3 f.0 
Oak Woodstrip Seat less Cover with bolts 2 90 

Oak Post Hinge Seat and Cover 3 85 

Mahog. Fin. Post Hinge Seat and Cove. - 4 75 



BOILERS AND RADIATORS SHOW 
NO CHANGE 

Toronto. 

Following the recent advance on boil- 
ers and radiators, no price developments 
have occurred in this line. Trade is said 
to be satisfactory for this season and 
spring requirements are expected to 
reach large proportions. 

RADIATORS— 

Revised radiator list prices are for 1, 
and 5-column radiators per square foot. 

38 in., $1 ; 32 in., $1.10; 30 in., $1.15 
$1.20; 23 in., $1.26; 22 in., $1.30; 20 in 
18 in., $1.40; 16 in., $1.50; 14 in., $1.55 
$1.60. 

Discount on 2, 3, 4 and 5 column standard 
sizes, 51 per cent, for water and 52 per cent, for 
steam. 

Discount on 1-column standard size, and 2, 3, 
and 4-column hospital sizes 43 per cent, for water 
and 44 per cent, for steam. 

Discounts on 1-column hospital size, water 29 
per cent; steam, 30 per cent. 

Wall radiators— 5 ft., $1.15 ; 6 ft.. $1.10; 7 
ft., »1.05; 9 ft., $1.05: 12 ft., $1.05. Discount 48 
per cent. 
BOILERS— 
Water: 

Round 60 per cent, off list. Square 20 per 
cent, off list. 
Steam : 

Round, 25 per cent, off list ; Square, 15 per 
cent, off list. 



2. 3, 4 

26 in., 
, $1.36; 
13 in.. 



BOILER TUBE I'KICKS REMAIN 
STATIONARY 

Toronto. 

No change is made in quotations on 
boiler tubes. Present prices are being 
well maintained, moderate business be- 
ing reported in most quarters. 

BOILER TUBES — 

Size Seamless. Lavweld 
% inch M9 00 $ 

1 inch 20 00 

lYi inch 22 00 

1% inch 24 00 

1% inch 24 00 

2 inch 22 00 

2Y4. inch 24 00 

2V2 inch 27 00 

3 inch 34 00 

3Yi inch 36 00 

3% inch 38 00 

4 inch 50 00 



23 00 
19 00 
21 60 
23 50 
28 50 
33 00 
33 00 
42 00 



CANADA PLATES ON A FIRM PRICE 
BASIS 

Toronto. 

Canada plates, Welsh, tin and terne 
plates remain stationary in price. There 
is no heavy movement reported in these 
lines and although reports from basic 
sources emphasize the steadily increas- 
ing firmness in tin and Canada plates, 
no adjustments have been made in local 
quotations. 

PLATES, CANADA— 1 Per box 

Ordinary, 52 sheets 4 90 

Dull, 60 sheets 5 00 

Blued and oiled, boxes 52's 5 60 

Do., boxes, 60's 6 60 

WELSH CANADA PLATES— 

Cold polished. 18 x 24, 60's 6 25 

Cold polished, 18 x 24, 60's 6 60 

PLATES, COKE TON- 
IC, 20 x 28, 112 sheets 12 75 

IX, 20 x 28, 112 sheets 15 00 

IX, 20 x 28, 56 sheets 8 bO 

PLATES, CHARCOAL TIN— 

IX, 20 x 28, 112 sheets 10 00 

IXX. 20 x 28 , 56 sheets 12 00 

PLATES, TERNE— 

IC. 14 x 20, 112 sheets 12 00 



CLAYTON AND LAMBERT TORCHES 
ADVANCE 

Toronto. 

Recently noted climbing tendencies in 
brass and copper primary markets are 
being reflected in some lines of finish- 
ed products. Torches are among the ear- 
lier lines affected and an adivance of 10 
per cent, is now quoted. Below is the re- 
vised list: 

CLAYTON AND LAMBERT TORCHES— 

No. 32, each 10 35 

No. 208, each 11 00 

No. 122, each 7 75 

No. 38, each 9 25 



SPRING PRICES ON SAP BUCKETS 
ANNOUNCED 

Toronto. 

New spring quotations on sap buckets 
are announced. Early quotations were 
for the most part lower than those now 
in effect and substantial bookings were 
reported at the lower price. New busi- 
ness, however, will be at the revised list 
which is given below: 

SAP BUCKETS— Per 100 

No. 7 straight 16 30 

No. 8 17 50 

No. 9 19 60 

No. 12 21 00 

No. 16 25 20 

No. 6, Western 15 75 

No. 10 21 00 

No. 8, galvanized straight 23 00 

No. 12 27 00 

No. 16 31 00 

No. 10, Western, galvanized 27 00 



36 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and 



Steamfitter 



March 1, 1923 



COMPRESSION GOODS PRICES 
HAVE REMAINED UN- 
CHANGED 

Toronto. . „ 

No change is recorded m the price oi 
compression goods. This line has shown 
a gradual improvement in turnover, sales 
are reported moderate to good for this 
season. Discounts shown are in effect lo- 
cally. 

COMPRESSION GOODS — 

Compression work, standard 4j> A> 

Fuller work, standard • »«|a> 

Quick opening compression bibbs 4<>£ 

Bath cocks, compression " v° 

Jenkins iron body, gate **ve 

Bath cocks, quick opening 

Basin cocks, quick opening 4b% 

Flatway stop and waste cocks, standard 5fr% 
Roundway stop and waste cocks, standard 5b% 

Brass steam cocks, standard • ™* 

Radiator valves, standard \%'m-a 

Do., removable discs nVn 

Globe, angle and check valves, standard. 25% 

Gate or straightway 25% 

Emco Globe valves 

Emco check valves 

Jenkins gate or straightway 16% 

Jenkins iron body, globe and angle 16% 

Jenkins Globe, angle, check and swing 

check 10 % 

Jenkins iron body, gate 25% 

NO CHANGE IN FITTINGS PRICES 

Toronto. 

The price of fittings is stationary at 
the old list. There is no special activity 
noted in this line, but good business is 
looked for as the season advances. 
FITTINGS— Mont. Tor 

% % 

Cast iron fittings 27 22 

Malleable bushings 30 25 

Cast bushings 30 25 

Unions 45 40 

Flanged unions 27 22 

Plugs, cast iron 27 22 

Couplings, 4 in., and under 25 25 

Do., 4% in. and larger 5 5 

MALLEABLE FITTINGS— 

New piece list adopted June 1, 1922. Discount, 

68 per cent. 



EAVESTROUGH AND CONDUCTOR 
PIPE FIRM 

T ° Fallowing the recent price revision 
noted recently, quotations on eaves- 
trough and conductor pipe have been 
well maintained at the new levels. The 
discount of 60 per cent, which replaces 
the former one of 70 per cent, is in force 
on the local market. 
TROUGH (EAVB)— 
O. G. Square Bead— 

Per 100 ft. Per 100 ft. 

8 inch $15 90 15 inch 34 50 

10 inch .. .. 17 70 18 inch 44 00 

12 inch 21 20 

O. G. Round and Half Round 

» inch 16 90 15 inch 3d 50 

10 inch 18 70 18 inch 45 00 

12 inch 22 20 

Less 60 per cent. 
PIPE (CONDUCTOR) — 

Plain, round or corrugated. 

Per 100 ft. in 10 ft. lengths 

2 in., in 10 ft. lengths, list 18 40 

3 in., in 10 ft. lengths, list 22 30 

4 in., in 10 ft. lengths, list 29 60 

5 in., in 10 ft. lengths, list 48 ,°.° on 

6 in., in 10 ft. lengths 58 80 

Less 60 per cent. 

ELBOWS (CONDUCTOR) — 

2 inch, list ■ ° j» 

3 inch, list 9 00 

4 inch, list J? *J» 

5 inch, list 24 00 

6 inch, list 29 00 

Less 60 per cent. 



REVISED QUOTATIONS IN EFFECT 
ON WROUGHT PIPE 

Winnipeg. . 

Quotations on wrought iron pipe have 
registered an advance of approximately 
five dollars per ton. Latest quotations 
are as follows: 

WROUGHT PIPE— Per 100 ft.— 

Black Galv'd. 

Size % inch 6 90 9 30 

Size Yi inch 4 90 7 25 

Size % inch 5 00 7 40 

Size V> inch « 45 8 20 

Size % inch 7 90 9 85 

Size 1 inch 11 30 14 10 

Size 1% inch 15 25 19 10 

Size IV, inch 18 25 22 &5 

Size 2 inch 24 55 30 75 

Size 2V, inch 38 80 48 65 

Size 3 inch 50 75 63 60 

Size 3V> inch 65 50 80 95 

Size 4 "inch 77 60 95 90 

Size 4V-, inch 91 90 113 25 

Size 5 "inches 107 15 132 05 

Size 6 inches 139 00 171 2'5 

Size 7 inches 200 50 

Size 8 inches 210 60 

. Size 9 inches 295 00 

Size 10 inches 273 90 

GENUINE WROUGHT IRON PIPE— 

Size 1V± inch 26 00 

Size iy 2 inch 31 10 

Size 2 inch 41 85 



WROUGHT NIPPLES REMAIN FIRM 

Toronto. 

The recently revised discounts on 
wrought nipples are still in effect. Fur- 
ther changes to higher levels have been 
looked for but no move in this direction 
has taken place to date. Below is the 
list of discounts governing nipples. 

NIPPLES. WROUGHT— 

Close and short, 4 in. and under, 50 per cent., 
41/i and larger. 40 per cent; long, 4 in. and under, 
55" per cent ; iYs in. and larger. 45 per cent ; 
running thread, 4 in. and under, 30 per cent. 



Winnipeg Markets 

WINNIPEG, February 28. — A firm tendency in the markets for 
plumbing and steam fitting supplies is again evidenced by a 
number of price revisions in an upward direction. Wrought 
iron pipe has shown an advance of approximately $5 per ton. 
Malleable iron fittings show a revision in price. New discounts are 
in effect on wrought nipples. The strong tendency in primary 
markets is reflected in a firm local market on corrugated sheets, 
boiler tubes and soil pipe. Business is reported satisfactory for this 
time of the year and with the approach of Spring and renewed 
building activities an improvement is looked forward to. 



REVISION IN DISCOUNTS ON MAL- 
LEABLE IRON FITTINGS 

Winnipeg. 

Revised discounts on malleable iron 
fittings are in effect. This revision is 
upward and class A is quoted at 55 per 
cent, with class B and C at 65 pef cent. 



PRIMARY LEAD MARKETS SHOW 
FIRMNESS 

Winnipeg. 

There' is a steady tone to lead and 
zinc goods at primary points and it is 
expected that this strength will be re- 
flected on the local market very shortly. 



NEW DISCOUNTS ANNOUNCED ON 
WROUGHT NIPPLES 

Winnipeg. 

New revisions upward are in effect 
this week on wrought iron nipples. Be- 
low is the new schedule of discounts: 

NIPPLES— 

Close and short 4 in. and under 45 per cent. ; 
4 1 /-; in. and larger 35 per cent; Long 4 in. and 
smaller, 50 per cent ; 4M> inch and larger, 40 
per cent. \ 



SOIL PIPE SHOWS NO CHANGE 

Winnipeg. 

There is no change in quotations on 
soil pipe but owing to productive cost 
the market is showing a strong- under- 
tone. The movement at present is quiet 
but with the approach of spring and 
building activities an improvement is 
expected. 



CORRUGATED SHEETS REMAIN ON 
FIRM PRICE BASIS 

Winnipeg. 

There is a firm tone to the galvanized 
sheet market and indications point to 
an upward direction. 



FIRM TONE TO BOILER TUBES 

Winnipeg. 

The upward tendency which has pre- 
vailed in the boiler tube market during 
recent weeks is likely to result in slight- 
ly higher price levels in the near future. 
Prices at the present time show no 
change. 



REVISED QUOTATIONS ON GATE 
VALVES 

Winnipeg. 

There is a revision in quotations on 
gate valves; half inch to two inch is 
quoted at list less 35 per cent, with two 
and one half inch to six inch at list less 
30 per cent. 



PRICE REVISION ON MALLEABLE 
RAIL FITTINGS 

Winnipeg. 

Revision in discounts is in effect on 
malleable rail fittings. The revised price 
is list less 40 per cent. 



BRASS STEAM COCKS MOVE 
UPWARD 

Winnipeg. 

Lower discounts are in effect on brass 
steam cocks. Sizes one quarter inch to 
two and one half inch are list less 40 per 

cent. 



JACKSON BALL COCKS SHOW AN 
ADVANCE 

Winnipeg. 

Higher quotations are in effect on 
Jackson ball cocks without floats and the 
present prices are $1.85 each. 



March 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 




Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 1, 1923 



CCRBIN ECOR CHECKS AT HIGHER 
PRICES 

^Virnipeff. 

There has been a slight advance in 
Columbian bronzed, dead black, antique 
copper and antique brass Corbin door 
checks. Screen door checks and brack- 
ets as well as coil springs have moved 
upward. The following lines are quot- 
ed as follows: 

SCREEN DOOR CHECKS — 

No. 01 each 3 75 

Brackets — Each — 

No. 26, size 1. $1.10: No. 26. size 2, SI. 40 ; 
No. 26, size 3, $1.60 ; No. 26. size 4. $2.00 : No. 
26, size 5, 52.45; No. 26, size 6. $2.60. 

No. 28. size 1. 95c: No. 28. size 2. SI. 10: No. 28, 
size 3. $1.40 ; No. 28. size 4. $1.60 : No. 28. size 
5. $1.95 : No. 28, size 6. $2.00. 

No. 25. size 1. 75c ; No. 25, size 2. 85c ; No. 25, 
size 3. 95c; No. 25. size 4. $1.20: No 25. size 
5. $160 ; No. 25, size 6. $1.75. 
CORBIN DOOR CHECKS— 

Columbian bronzed, each — 

No. 1 $6.95; 2 $9.10; 3 $10.65; 4 $12.80; 5 
$17.00; 6 $21.35. 
Dead Black, each — 

No. 1 $6.95; 2 $9.10; 3 $10.65; 4 $12.80; 5 
$17.00; 6 $21.35. 

Antique Copper, each — 

No. T. R. 1 $12.25: 2 $14.40; 3 $16.00; 4 
$18.15: 5 $22.40: 6 $26.65. 
Antiqule Brass, each — 

No. T. E. A. 1 $12.25; 2 $14.40; 3 $16.00; 4 
$18.15; 5 $22.40: 6 $26.65. 

coil springs- 
no. 139—53—15 list price plus 33-1/3%. 



CLOSET COMBINATIONS AT 
REDUCED PRICES 

Winnipeg:. 

A reduction has been recorded on some 
lines of low-down closet combinations. 
One line with a syphon wash-down bowl 
is quoted at $32.65 and one with a sy- 
phon jet-bowl at S37.00. 



HIGHER PRICES ON PORCELAIN 
ENAMELED LAVATORIES 

Toronto. 

A slight advance has been recorded on 
porcelain enameled lavatories with slab, 
rear outlet, oval bowl and apron in one- 
piece, supported on porcelain pedestal. 
Quotations on sizes 20 x 24 is $33.00 and 
22 x 27, $39.40. 



STEEL BATHS AT LOWER 
QUOTATIONS 

Winnipeg. 

A slight reduction has been recor.ded 
on some sizes of steel baths, five-foot 
steel baths are quoted at $13.00 and five- 
and one half foot at $14.50. 



HIGHER PRICES ON CORBIN TRAN- 
SOM LIFTERS 

Winnipeg-. 

An advance of five to forty-five cents 
each has been recorded on Corbin tran- 
som lifters and the following prices are 
now in effect: 
corbin transom lifters- 
no. 83 length 3 ft. each 48 

No. 83 length 4 ft. each.. 48 

No. 84 length 4 ft. each 72 

No. 84 length 5 ft. each 85 

No. 85 length 6 ft. each 1 20 

No. R. O. 83 lengths 3 ft. each 70 

No. R. O. 83 length 4 ft. each 70 

No. K. A. 83 length 3 ft. each 70 

No. K. A. 83 length 4 ft. each 70 

No. R. O. 84 length 4 ft. each 95 

No. R. O. 84 length 5 ft. each 1 10 

No. K. A. 84 length 4 ft. each 95 

No. K. A. 84 length 5 ft. each 1 10 

No. R. O. and K. A. 85 length 6 ft. each 1 45 



HIGHER PRICES ON CLOSET 
BOWLS 

Winnipeg. 

A slight advance has been recorded 
on china water closet bowls, one line fit- 
ted with spud is quoted at $10.60 and the 
same with rear vent at $10.90. 



HIGH TANK CLOSET COMBINA- 
TIONS MOVE UPWARDS 

Winnipeg. 

There has been an advance in high 
tank closet combinations. One line of 
golden oak finish with varnished high 
tank, copper lining and nickel-plated 
brackets is now quoted at $38.00. 



HIGHER PRICES ON CLOSET 
SEATS 

Winnipeg. 

Higher prices are in effect on some 
lines of closet seats. Golden oak and 
birch mahogany are quoted at $4.50 each 
and ivory white at $7.00. 

CLOSET TANKS AT HIGHER PRICES 

Winnipeg. 

Higher prices are quoted on closet 
tanks, one line complete with inside fit- 
tings, elbow and supply pipe is quoted 
at $16.00, another at $18.50 and one com- 
plete with supply pipe, elbow and coup- 
ling nut at $17.25. 



Are Opposed to Commercial Agreements I 
Act Now Before the Ontario^ House 



TORONTO, Ont.— An Act cited as 
Commercial Agreements Act has 
been given its first reading in the 
Ontario Legislature. This Act provides 
that an action may be brought by the At- 
torney-General of Ontario in the Su- 
preme Court for a declaration that an 
agreement exists which: — 

(a) — constitutes a conspiracy in re- 
straint of trade as being an agreement 
between two or more persons to do or 
procure to be done an unlawful act in 
restraint of trade, (b)- is an agreement 
to unduly limit for transporting, pro- 
ducing, manufacturing, supplying, stor- 
ing or dealing in any article or com- 
modity which may be a subject of trade 
or commerce, (c)- is an agreement to 
restrain or injure trade or commerce in 
relation to any such article or commod- 
ity, (d)- is an agreement to unduly limit 
or restrain the manufacture or produc- 
tion of any such article or commodity 
or to unreasonably enhance the price 
thereof, (e)- is an agreement to unduly 
prevent or lessen competition in the pro- 
duction, manufacture, purchase, barter, 
sale, transportation or supply of any ar- 
ticle or commodity, and that such agree- 
ment is unlawful and void, and for an in- 
junction, mandatory order or other relief. 

If the Court finds that such agreement 
comes within any of the clauses from 
(a) to (e) of the above section, it shall 
declare such agreement unlawful and 
void to all intents and purposes, and the 
Court may make such order with re- 
spect to past and future dealings, rights 
or obligations of the parties to such 
agreement as may be deemed just and 
expedient, having in view the course of 
business between the parties, the degree 
of s:ood faith manifsted by them in en- 
tering into acting under, or carrying out 
such agreement, and the protection of 
the public interest, and may make such 
further order as circumstances require 
to prevent the carrying out of such 
agreement or any similar agreement. 

The Bill has only been introduced. It is 
designed to take the place of the Anti- 
Combines Bill which was introduced just 
at the close of the 1922 session, and 
gainst which there was so much opposi- 
tion. The Commercial Agreement Act 



as here outlined is not generally approv- 
ed of, however. The feeling of manu- 
facturers in regard to this Bill is cer- 
tainly opposed to it; the Canadian 
Wholesale Grocers' Association when 
given an opportunity to express their 
position in regard to the above, last De- 
cember, declared against it. It was stat- 
ed by officers of the association at that 
time that such a Bill constituted the At- 
torney-General's department a detective 
bureau, giving its officials the right to 
investigate any firm's affairs where, in 
the Attorney-General's opinion, an agree- 
ment contrary to this Act exists. 



HOUSEHOLDERS FIRST ON LIST 
FOR GAS 

(Continued from page 15) 
be supplied shall include only such ap- 
pliances as are constructed and equipped 
for heating purposes; ordinary steam 
power boilers used for steam heating 
shall not be supplied with gas." 

Provisions under which a special per- 
mit for the use of natural gas may be 
issued are made in the regulations. 

The use of devices to pump an extra 
supply from the mains is prohibited. 

"Any person who makes use of any 
device attached to any service pipe for 
the purpose of withdrawing gas from 
any main in a larger quantity or under 
greater pressure than the ordinary flow 
of gas from the main, unless under spe- 
cial permission from the commissioner, 
shall immediately be cut off from any 
further supply. 

"Gas shall be supplied only in cases 
where suitable appliances for economical 
consumption are employed, and where 
such appliances are kept in good condi- 
tion and adjustment. Service lines here- 
after installed shall not be less than one 
inch in diameter." 

Rules governing the drilling of wells 
are also embodied in the document. An 
inspection of all consumers' appliances 
for burning gas is also demanded: 

"All distributors of natural gas shall 
inspect their consumers' appliances at 
least twice yearly, and shall either ad- 
just or instruct and assist the consumer 
in adjusting all equipment to burn gas 
with the greatest possible economy." 



Marcn i, ivzo 



o A N [TAR I Ei IN G I N t E R , f 



LUMBER AND oTEAMFITTER 



39 



JENKINS 
Brass Swing 
Check Valve 




Sectional View of Fig. 475 

A strong, handsome and durable 
valve with the Jenkins Renewable 
Disc feature. 

The angle of the seat is such that 
it opens readily at low pressure and 
the shock of closing under high pres- 
sure in the most severe service is 
absorbed in the line piping. 

This Jenkins model is adapted for use 
in either horizontal or vertical posi- 
tion. 

Fig. 475 illustrated here is the Stand- 
ard pattern for 150 pounds working 
pressure. Made in extra heavy pat- 
terns (Fig. 260) suitable for 300 lbs. 
working pressure. 

The complete Jenkins line is pictured 
and described in Catalog No. 9 — free 
on request. 




View Looking into Body of Valve 

JENKINS BROS. LIMITED 

103 ST. REMI ST. MONTREAL 

Sales Offices: 

TORONTO VANCOUVER 

European Branch: 6 Great Queen St., Kingsway, 
London, W.C. 2, Eng. 





Sell Desolvo 
As Well As Use It 



Y Manufactured ty 

"« Chamberlain Cow*" 

Prrr sbsjrqw . P*: 



Every time you call at a house and thaw out 
frozen pipes you lose money because if you 
charge what your time is really worth the cus- 
tomer thinks you are robbing him — so you charge 
him less — and lose money. 

Sell him a can of Desolvo instead. Then tell him 
to keep a can on hand and to use it every month. 
Get a hundred customers like this buying a can 
every month — 100 cans a month without effort 
and a real profit besides. 

This will be easy for you because Desolvo is being 
advertised in the Canadian newspapers and every 
piece of copy emphasizes to the retailer the im- 
portance of using a can of Desolvo every month. 
Your jobber's salesman has Desolvo. Tell him to 
send you a trial order. Begin now to build up 
this big new business that is waiting for you. 



K-K is a specially prepared chemical for 
cleaning solid porcelain or vitreous ware 
only. You can use K-K in your work as 
well as sell it along with Desolvo. Get a 
trial order from your jobber. 



THE CHAMBERLAIN DESOLVO CO., Ltd. 

Toronto, Canada 

KEEPS DRAIN PIPES CLEAN g» 

esoLvu 

Use A. Cein Every Month 





40 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 1, 1923 





AIR COMPRESSORS 

Smart Turner Machine Co., Ltd., Hamilton. Ont. 
AIR LINE SYSTEMS 

C. A. Dunham, Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., Man- 
chester. Eng. 
ALUMINUM CASTINGS 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
AIR VALVES 

Beaton & Caldwell Mfg. Co., New Britain, 
Conn. 

W. H. Cunningham & HU1. Ltd., Toronto. 

C. A. Dunham Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

J. H. Wiliams Co., Brooklyn. New York. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers. Ltd.. Man- 
chester. Eng. 

Wallaceburg Brass & Iron Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Wal- 
laceburg, Ont. 

Wolverine Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 
BATHS. STEEL 

Steel Trough & Machine Co.. 'Ltd.. Tweed. Ont. 
ATMOSPHERIC STEAM HEATING 

J. E Farrell. 210 Galley Ave.. Toronto. Ont 
BATHROOM FITTINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Gendron Mfg. Co.. Toronto. 
BENDING SPRINGS 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd.. Toronto. 
BOILERS. STEAM OR HOT WATER 

Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto. 

Lord & Burnham Co.. Ltd.. Toronto. 

Spencer Heater Co., Ltd.. Toronto, Ont. 

Warden Kine. Ltd.. Montreal. 
BOILER FEED PUMPS 

Smart Turner Machine Co.. Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 
BOILER FEED REGULATORS 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

J. E. Farrell. 210 Galley Ave.. Toronto, Ont. 

C. A. Dunham Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co.. 23 River Street. Toronto. 
BOILER STANDS 

Fittings. Limited, Oshawa. 
BOLTS, EYE 

J. H. Williams & Co.. Brooklyn. N. Y. 
BOLTS AND NUTS 

Fittings Limited. Oshawa. 
BRASS GOODS, VALVES. ETC. 

Canadian Brass Co.. Ltd.. Gait. Ont. 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 

C. A. Durham Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 

Empire Mfg.. Co., Ltd.. London and Toronto. 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 

Gait Brass Co., Limited, Gait. 

Kerr Engine Co., Ltd., Walkerville. 

James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co.. Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Sarnia. Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

United Brassfounders and Engineers. Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
Wallaceburg Brass & Iron Mfg. Co., Ltd,. Wal- 
laceburg, Ont. 

Wolverine Ltd., Toronto. Ont. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto 
BRASS PIPE AND TUBE 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Ltd.. London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 

Wolverine, Ltd., Toronto. Ont. 
CASTINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Fittings, Limited. Oshawa. 
CELLAR DRATNERS 

Gait Brass Co., Limited. Gait. 

Empire Mfg. Ltd.. London and Toronto. 

James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd.. Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Toronto, and 
Hamilton. 
CIRCULATORS 

J. E. Farrell, 210 Galley Ave.. Toronto, Ont. 

J. H. Williams & Co.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
CHAINS 

Fittings. Limited, Oshawa. 

J. H. Williams & Co.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
CLOSETS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Tcronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

Gait Brass Co., Limited, Gait. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg., Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

Steel Trough & Machine Co., Ltd., Tweed, Ont. 



C LOSETS — Chemical 

Steel Trough & Machine Co., Ltd., Tweed, Ont. 
CONDENSATION UNITS 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

J. E. Farrell, 210 Galley Ave., Toronto, Ont. 

Smart Turner Machine Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 

The Westco Pumps, Limited, Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street. Toronto. 
COUNTRY RESIDENCE EQUIPMENTS 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Sarnia, Ont. 

Smart Turner Machine Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 

COUPLINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Fittings Limited, Oshawa. 
DAMPER REGULATORS 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
DRAINAGE FITTINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

Fittings Limited, Oshawa. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., Man- 
chester, Eng. 

Warden King, Ltd., Montreal. 
DRAIN PIPE SOLVENT 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

Hercules Chemical Co., Inc., New York City. 
DRINKING FOUNTAINS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg., Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 
DROP FORGINGS 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
EJECTORS, STEAM 

Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
ENAMELWARE 

Amherst Foundry Co., Ltd., Amherst, N.S. 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

Gait Brass Co., Limited, Gait. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd.. Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

Port Hope Sanitary Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Port Hope 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 
ELECTRIC PUMPING MACHINERY 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Sarnia. Ont. 

Smart Turner Machine Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Out 
EXPANSION TANKS 

Toronto Hardware Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
FITTINGS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto, 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

Fittings Limited, Oshawa. 

James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 

Warden King. Ltd.. Montreal. 
FLUSHOMETERS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

Gait Brass Co.. Ltd., Gait. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

Wolverine Ltd.. Toronto, Ont. 
FLOOR AND CEILING PLATES 

Beaton & Cadwell Mfg. Co.. New Britain. Conn. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

Fittings. Limited, Oshawa. 

Wolverine Ltd.. Toronto, Ont. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
FURNACES 

Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto. 

Warden King, Ltd., Montreal. 

Spencer Heater Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Hamilton Stove & Heater Co.. Homilton. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne, Hamilton. 

Hall-Zryd, Hespeler, Ont. 

Vulcan Co., London, Ont. 
GASOLINE ENGINES 

Empire Mfg. Co.. Ltd., London and Toronto. 
GAS WATER HEATERS 

Bastian-Morley. Limited, Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 



James Morrison Brass Mfg., Toronto. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Sarnia, Ont. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
GALVANIZING 

Fittings. Limited, Oshawa. 
HEAT GENERATORS 

Gait Brass Co., Gait, Ont. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street. Toronto. 
HEATING APPARATUS 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Smart Turner Machine Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 

J. E. Farrell, 210 Galley Ave., Toronto, Ont. 
HEATERS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronco. 

Lord & Burnham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Smart Turner Machine Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 

Warden King, Ltd., Montreal and Toronto. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
HEATING SYSTEMS 

C. A. Dunham Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 

J. E. Farrell, 210 Galley Ave.. Toronto. Ont. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
HOIST HOOKS 

J. H. Williams & Co.. Brooklyn, N.Y. 
JAPANNING 

Fittings, Limited. Oshawa. 
KEROSENE WATER HEATERS 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
LAUNDRY TUBS 

The Canada Metal Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Hamilton. 

Steel Trough & Machine Co., Ltd., Tweed. Ont. 
LAVATORIES 

Steel Trough & Machine Co., Ltd., Tweed, Ont. 

LEAD 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto, 
Hamilton. 
MACHINISTS' TOOLS 

J. H. Williams & Co.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
MALLEABLE IRON CASTINGS 

Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto. 

Fittings. Limited. Oshawa. 
MACHINE BOLTS AND NUTS 

Fittings. Limited, Oshawa. 
MIXING VALVES 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

Port Hope Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Port Hope. 
PACKING 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
RADIATOR FOOT RESTS 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

Wolverine Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
PACKLESS RADIATOR VALVES 

Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville. 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 
PIPE AND RADIATOR HANGERS 

Beaton & Cadwell Mfg. Co., New Britain, 
Conn. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

Healy-Ruff Company, Minneapolis, Minn. 
PIPE. BLACK AND GALVANIZED 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Canadian Tube and Iron Co., Ltd.. Montreal. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 
PIPE CLEANSER 

Chamberlain Desolvo Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd.. London and Toronto 

Hercules Chemical Co., Inc., New York City. 

Wolverine. Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
PIPE JOINT COMPOUNDS 

Wolverine, Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill. Ltd., Toronto. 
PIPE, SOIL AND FITTINGS 

Anthes Foundry Co., Toronto and Winnipeg. 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Ltd., London and Toronto. 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 



March 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



41 





No. 34. 



nil 



For Steam and 
Hot Water Heating 

Kerr Radiator Valves need no introduction. They 
have been setting a standard of quality and efficiency 
in connection with Hot Water and Steam heating for 
many years, and continue as recognized leaders in 
this line of valves. 

Kerr Valves on your Radiator is a stamp of quality 
on the job. 

Ask your jobber for KERR valves. He likely has 
them in stock. 

Kerr N. P. Union Elbows register with either the Hot 
Water or the Steam Valve, and are of same standard 
high quality. 

Cf/iG KERR ENGINE COMPANY 

LIMITED 

.„.. ,.,-_<./■■ , r- Valve Manufacturers 

WALKEF2VILLL ONTARIO 



7 




No. 39. 









FITTINGS LIMITED 



OSHAWA, CAN. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 




GG 



DHAMOMD 88 PIPE FITTINGS 



42 



Sanitary ' Engineer, Plumber a 



N D 



Steamfitter 



March 1, 1923 



Toronto Hardware Mfg., Co., Toronto. 

Warden King, Ltd., Montreal. 
PIPE THREADING TOOLS AND MACHINERY 

Borden Canadian Co., Toronto. 

A. B. Jardine & Co.. Hespeler. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
PIPE WRENCHES 

J H. Williams Co., Brooklyn, New York. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
PLUMBERS' TOOLS 

J. H. Williams & Co., Montreal, Que. 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill. Ltd., Toronto. 
PNEUMATIC WATER SUPPLY TANKS 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

Steel Trough & Machine Co., Ltd., Tweed, Ont. 
PORCELAIN WARE 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
PUMPS 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 

H. Mu'eller Mfg. Co., Limited. 

Smart Turner Machine Co.. Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 

Steel Trough & Machine Co., Ltd., Tweed, Ont. 

The Westco Pumps Limited, Toronto. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
PUMPING SYSTEMS, AUTOMATIC 

Canada Metal Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Limited. 

Smart Turner Machine Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 

The Westco Pumps. Limited, Toronto. 

Beaton & Cadwell Mfg. Co., New Britain, Conn. 
RADIATORS 

Gumey Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto. , 

Lord & Bumham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Warden King Ltd., Montreal. 
RADIATOR HANGERS 

Healy Ruff Company. 
RADIATOR NIPPLES 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 
RADIATOR TRAPS (STEAM) 

C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Grant E. Cole Co.. 23 River Street, Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Sarnja, Ont. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers Ltd., Man- 
chester, Eng. 
RIVETS 

Fittings. Limited. Oshawa. 
RANGE BOILERS 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

The Canadian John Wood Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Toronto Hardware Mfg. Co.. Toronto. 
REDUCING PRESSURE VALVES 
Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
J. E. Farrell, 210 Galley Ave.. Toronto, Ont. 



H. Mueller Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd.. 

Manchester, Eng. 
RETURN TILTING TRAPS 

J E Farrell 210 Galley Ave., Toronto, Ont. 
Grant E. Cole Co.. 23 River Street. Toronto. 
ROOF FLANGES AND FLASHINGS 
Canada Metal Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto, 

Hamilton. 

SEPTIC TANK VALVES AND SYPHONS 
Anthes Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 
H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

SINK BRACKETS 

Fittings, Limited, Oshawa. 
SOCKETS, WIRE ROPE 

J. H. Williams & Co., Montreal, Que. 

SOLDER 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

STANDS, VISE, PORTABLE 

H. P. Martin & Sons, Owensboro, Kentucky. 
STEAM SPECIALTIES 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 
J. E. Farrell. 210 Galley Ave., Toronto, Ont. 
Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
Smart Turner Machine Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 
United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 

STEAM TRAPS 

Grant E. Cole Co., 23 River Street, Toronto. 
C. A. Dunham Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
J. E. Farrell, 210 Galley Ave.. Toronto, Ont. 
United Brassfounders & Engineers Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
STORAGE TANK HEATERS 

J. E. Farrell, 210 Galley Ave., Toronto, Ont. 

STOVES 

Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto. 
STOVES. GAS AND COAL 

Gurnev Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
SUMP PUMPS 

Smart Turner Machine Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 

SWIVELS, HOOK 

J. H. William* & Co.. Brooklyn, N.Y. 

SYSTEM— ELECTRIC 

Steel Trough & Machine Co., Ltd., Tweed. Ont. 

SYSTEMS— SCHOOL 

Steel Trough & Machine Co., Ltd., Tweed, Ont. 
TANKS— GASOLINE 

Steel Trough & Machine Co., Ltd., Tweed, Ont. 



TANKS, STEEL 

The Canadian John Wood Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
TANKS— STORAGE 

Steel Trough & Machine Co., Ltd., Tweed, Ont. 
TANK BULBS, (RUBBER) 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 

W H. Cunningham & Hill. Ltd., Toronto. 
THUMB SCREWS AND NUTS 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

TOOLS 

Wolverine, Ltd., Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 
H Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hamilton. 

J H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 

TORCHES 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill, Ltd., Toronto. 
UNIONS 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers, Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
VAPOR HEATING SYSTEMS 

C. A. Dunham Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 
VISES, CHAIN, CLAMP, MOUNT 

J. H. Williams & Co., Brooklyn. N.Y. 
VITRO TANKS 

Gait Brass Co., Ltd.. Gait. 
VACUUM SYSTEMS OF HEATING 

C. A. Dunham Co.. Ltd.. Toronto. 

Smart Turner Machine Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 
VALVES , , „, 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

Jenkins Bros., Ltd., Montreal, Que. 

The Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 

United Brassfounders & Engineers Ltd., 
Manchester, Eng. 
WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

Smart Turner Machine Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Hamilton. ■ 

Steel Trough & Machine Co.. Ltd., Tweed. Ont. 

The Westco Pumps, Limited, Toronto 
WASHERS 

Canada Metal Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 

W H. Cunningham & Hill. Ltd., Toronto. 
WASHING MACHINES 

Gurney Foundry Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 
WRENCHES, SET. DROP FORGED, 
ENGINEERS, SOCKET AND CHAIN PIPE 

J. H. Williams & Co.. Brooklyn. N.Y. 
WROUGHT COUPLINGS AND NIPPLES 
Canada Metal Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 
Fittings, Ltd., Oshawa. 




Are These The Opportunities You're Looking For? 

Fan Heating and Ventilating Engineering is the pinnacle of all other forms of heating, and 
of all branches of steam fitting and sheet metal work. It prepares you for: 

1. For Employers it enlarges their business opportunities 100%. 

2. Employees it raises to Foremanship of a large shop. 

3. Or as Designing Engineer of some large Heating Contractor, 
t. As an intelligent Salesman of Heating Appliances. 

5. As Chief Engineer with a Heating or Furnace Manufacturing Co. 

6. Later a Consulting Engineer to Architects and Building Contractors, etc. 

Which of These Are You Working for? 

Full Information Free. Select Your Course. 

[ ] Fan Heating and Ventilating Engineering. [ ] Sheet Metal Design and Pattern Drafting. 
[ ] Business Management, for office folks. 



ST. LOUIS TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 



4543 Clayton Avenue 



O. W. Kothe, Prin. 



St. Louis, Mo. 



Good papers furnish A.B.C. reports to their advertisers. 
Sanitary Engineer is a member of the Audit Bureau 

of Circulations. 



March 1, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, Pl 



UMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



43 



Rouad. 



Automatic GasWaterHeaters 



A Better Heater 
at a Lower Price 



The Cost of the Royal Automatic 
Heater is less than half that of 
the coal type heater of similar 
service capacity. 

It is easy to install, uses little gas 
and delivers hot water instantly 
at the faucet 24 hours of the day. 
The Royal thermostat may be set 
to maintain any desired tempera- 
ture of water from S0° to 200°. 
The Royal, once installed is fool 
proof. Nothing can get out of or- 
fisr ; the plumb3r who sells it has 
no expensive trips, he retains all of 
his original profit. 
Sold only tnrough or by plumbers. 
Write today for full information. 



Bastian - Morley, Limited 



125 Hanson St. 



Toronto 





Williams' Stillson 

Drop-Forged 

Pipe Wrenches 

Grip pipe and fittings positively and in- 
stantly, yet release readily. They do not 
slip and neither do they crush nor lock on 
the pipe. The Bar and Jaw, drop-forged 
from a specially selected grade of steel, 
are hardened and tempered; the Adjust- 
ing Nut is of wrought steel, case-hardened. 
Unconditionally guaranteed against defec- 
tive workmanship and material. 

Wood or Steel Handle Patterns 
8 Sizes — 6 to 48 inches 
Made in Canada 
Ask your Dealer . Literature? 

J. H. WILLIAMS & CO., Limited 

"The Wrench People" 

77 Thorold Road, St. Catharines, Ontario 




Ever see two boilers in one? 

That's what Burnham Boilers are. Great 
big- man's size heat givers for cold, bleak 
days. Or on uncertain spring days, they 
run at half time just as economically as 
when at full blast. The grates shake half 
at a time, so you could run half the boiler 
at a time. 

Write us for complete information. 
(Boiler Department) 




Harboi 
Commission 
Bldg., 
Toronto 




Factory: 
St. Catharines, 
Ontario 



warn 



The Everlasting 
Veneer Toilet Seat 



Strong, Clean 
Hygienic 

This reliable, dependable 
toilet seat is made of r i 
and 9-ply, air-seasoned 
wood veneer, held to- 
gether by our special 
wood cement. This ce- 
ment is proof against 
heat, cold or dampness. 
The veneering is distri- 
buted according to the 
strain and wear required 
of the different parts. 
The Everlasting Seat will 
never crack, warp or 
split. 

It is a splendid seat for use in cold, damp basements 
where closets must be installed. The Everlasting Toilet 
Seat will meet, and successfully resist, these severe con- 
ditions of moisture, changing temperature, etc. 



Canadian 
Veneering Company, 
Incorporated 




Acton Vale 



Quebec 



44 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March I, 1923 




Few people realize the tremendous selling power of classified adver- 
tising or the exceptional opportunity which it offers. 

Hundreds of Sanitary Engineers to-day are carrying equipment for 
which they have no further need, yet many others could use this 
same equipment to good advantage and would be glad to buy at a 
fair price, if they but knew of it. 

How to get buyer and seller together — that's the question. The 
answer is — SANITARY ENGINEER classified advertising service. 
Thousands of Sanitary Engineers throughout the country read the 
classified advertisements every issue. That's why they produce 
results surely and quickly. 

If you want to buy, sell or exchange equipment. 

If you want to sell or exchange your store. 

If you want to buy a store. 

If you are looking for a location. 

If you need a competent journeyman. 

If you are seeking a position. 

In fact if you wish to buy, sell or exchange anything used in a 
plumbing and steamfitting shop or for any reason desire to quickly 
get in touch with other Sanitary Engineers, use SANITARY 
ENGINEER'S classified advertising service. The charge is ridic- 
ulously low— $1.50 for twenty-five words, 5 cents for each additional 
word. 



Look For The Classified Column 

on Page 46 



March 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



45 



A Complete Line 
Sells 
Better 



"In many lines it has 
been proven that the 
dealer who makes the 
best sales record is the 
one who has a complete 
line of a varied group of 
products under one brand 
name, rather than the 
dealer who separates his 
orders among several 
manufacturers." 

— Printers' Ink. 



Experience has no doubt 
proven to you that the 
leading line of bathroom 
fittings and hardware 
specialties is the 
Gendron line. 





The Gendron Mfg. Co., Limited 



Duchess St., Toronto 



TRADE 



RUNWELL 





MARK 



SEMI-ROTARY 
WING 
PUMPS 



British 
Manufacture 




Ask your 
Jobber to 
supply you 
with these 
Pumps. 



Representatives : 

BRITISH COLUMBIA; U.S.A.— WASHINGTON, OREGON, CALIFORNIA. 

FRANK RAW & CO., 198 Hastings St. W., Vancouver, B.C. 
MANITOBA, SASKATCHEWAN, ALBERTA: 

FREDERICK SARA & CO., Calgary. 
ONTARIO, QUEBEC, MARITIME PROVINCES: 

UNIVERSAL SUPPLIES, LTD., 212 Coristine Bldg., Montreal 




Made with Wood Handles, in 6 in., 8 in., 10 in., 14 in 

A Trimo Wrench will pay you 

When you figure on a job you naturally desire 
that everything will be just right so that you 
can go ahead with every confidence to a satis- 
factory completion of your undertaking. 

One of the most important items to figure on 
is the question of a reliable wrench. The 
"Trimo" will fill your every need. 

The "Trimo" is the wrench with the Steel 
Frames and Nut Guards. 

Made with Wood Handles in 6", 8", 10", 14" 
sizes. 

Made with Steel Handles in all sizes. 

MADE BY THE 

Trimont Manufacturing Company 

55-71 Amory Street 

Roxbury (Boston), Mass., U.S.A. 

CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVE: 

GEO. P. FRASER, 28 Temple Ave. 

TORONTO. 




THE TRADE 

Is Respectfully Cautioned 
to specify 

RIVETED 
RANGE BOILERS 

Made by the old reliable 

TORONTO HARDWARE 
MFG. CO., LIMITED 



46 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 1, 1923 




Rates for Classified Advertising 

Advertisements under this heading 3c per word for first insertion; 2c for each subsequent insertion. 

Where answers come to Box number in our care to be forwarded, 5 cents extra per insertion must 
be added to cover postage, etc. 

Contractions count as one word, but five figures (as $1,000), are allowed as one word. 

Rates (payable in advance). When panels are desired a charge of $2.50 is made for a panel 1 
inch deep by 2V$ inches wide. Minimum charge for any ad. $1.00. 



FOR SALE 



ADDRESSING MACHINE FOR SALE — WE 
have a complete Belknap Addressing Equip- 
ment for sale. This equipment is still in use in 
our Subscription Department and is in excellent 
working order. We have placed an attractive 
price on this outfit, and would advise manufac- 
turers or merchants having a mailing list to 
let us tell you how it will save you money. We 
will give a guarantee as to the proper working 
condition of this equipment. The MacLean Pub- 
lishing Co., Ltd., 143 University Avenue. Toronto, 



pOR SALE— OLD ESTABLISHED PLUMBING, 
heating and sheet metal business. Side line 
Hardware. Three hours from city of Vancouver, 
in one of the best centers of British Columbia. 
Owner having to give up on account of wife's 
health. This is a rare opening. S3. 000. 00 cash 
takes it. Address Box 518 Sanitary Engineer, 
Toronto. 



yAYLOR SAFES FOR SALE— RARE OPPOR- 
tunity to secure a safe at small cost. They 
are in splendid condition. Inside dimensions and 
prices are as follows : 15 in. deep, 2 ft. 6 in. wide, 

3 ft. 11% i"- high, fitted with built-in compart- 
ment. Price J250.OO. 18 in. deep. 2 ft. 8 in. wide, 

4 ft. 5 in. high, fitted with steel compartment 
Price $200.00 Apply Box No. 701, Sanitary En- 
gineer, Toronto. 



yOU HAVE locks 
and bars on the 
doors and windows - 
of your store ? You have provided 
that thieves shall not break in and 
steal your goods. 

Have you done the same for your 
investments? Of course you have 
your bonds and stocks and insur- 
ance policies in a safety deposit 
box or in your office safe, but 
after all that is the smallest ele- 
ment of protection? 



When thieves break in 



The really effective way 

tect your investments is 
only good invest- 
ments; sound in- 
vestments; invest- 
ments suitable for 
your purposes. To 
do so requires a cer- 
tain understanding 
of investments and 
a knowledge of week 

to week financial 

conditions. 



to pro- 
to buy 



Have you protected your 
investments as well as you 
have protected your store? 



THE FINANCIAL POST 

is weekly giving 9,000 
other Canadian investors 
and business men reliable 
news and well-tempered 



advice, 
about: 




and business 



It tells them 



Business Conditions 
Insurance 
Bonds 
Stocks 
Mortgages 
Political Develop- 
ments 
National Progress 
Civic Affairs, etc. 




Ask your bank man- 
ager about THE 
FINANCIAL POST 
if you are doubtful if it would 
be of real value to you. He will 
explain how highly THE POST 
is regarded as an authority; 
how valuable its investment and 
business articles can be 
to you. 

To make the most of your 
business and investments 
in 1923 you should sub- 
scribe now. Fill in the 
coupon; attach $5 and we 
will start you off for a 
year. 



THE FINANCIAL POST, 

143 University Avenue, Toronto. 

You may send me The Financial Post 
for one year (52 issues). I enclose 
$5.00. Or you may draw on me. 

NAME 



ADDRESS 



March 1, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



47 



Index to Advertisers 

Allison, K. B 10 

Amherst Foundry Co., Ltd 48 

Anthes Foundry Co 2 

Ashwell & Nesbit, Ltd 45 



Bastian-Morley 

Beaton & Cadwell Mfg. Co. 
Borden Company 



43 
1 
9 



Canada Metal Co Inside Front Cover 

Chamberlain Desolvo Co., Ltd 39 

Canadian Tube & Steel Products 48 

Canadian-Veneering Co., Inc 43 

Crane, Limited 3 

Cunningham Hill, Ltd., W. H 12 



Dart Union Co., Ltd. 
Dunham, C. A., Co. 



. .Inside Back Cover 
10 



Empire Brass Mfg. Co., Outside Front Cover 

Farrell, J. E 9 

Fittings, Ltd 41 

Forwell Foundry, Ltd 9 

Gendron Mfg. Co., Ltd 45 

Gait Brass Co Outside Back Cover 

Grant E. Cole Company 8 



Henderson Business Service, Ltd. 
Healy-Ruff Co 



Jenkins Bros 39 

Jewett Radio-Phonograph Co 8 

Jardine & Co., A. B 12 

Katie Foundry Co 48 

Kerr Eng. Co., Ltd 41 

Lord & Burnham Co 43 

Mueller Mfg. Co., Ltd., H 37 

Pipe Tool & Repair Co 48 

Smart Turner Machine Co., 

Inside Back Cover 
42 

5 



St. Louis Technical Institute 
Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co. 



Steel Trough & Machine Co 48 

Toronto Hardware Mfg. Co., Ltd 45 

Trimont Manufacturing Co 45 

Want Ad. Page 

Warden King, Ltd 

Wallaceburg Brass & Iron Mfg. Co., 

Ltd 

Williams & Co., J. H 

Wolverine, Limited 47 



46 
7 

6 

43 



Resolve Now to 
Use Wolverine 

Quality 
Supplies 
and 
Traps 




Fig. 685 R 



Fig. 683 R 




76 Nelson S fci Toronto - 



Fig. 34 X 



Wolverine Bath 
Room Finishing 

Materials 

and 

Specialties 
Are the Best 




48 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 1, 192:5 







BEAVER BRAND 

Porcelain Enamel Ware 

— Your Guarantee of Quality— 

Beaver Brand Enamelware by its ability to meet the 
highest demands for service under all conditions, 
has established itself in the confidence o£ the public 
to such an extent that each month witnesses an ever- 
increasing demand for products of Beaver manu- 
facture. 

Amherst Foundry Co., Limited 

General Offices and Factory : Amherst, N.S. 



Agents : 



Ontario : 

Monarch Brass Mfg. Co. 
71 Brown St., Toronto 



Manitoba and Northwest 

E. B. Plewes 
197 Princess St., Winnipeg 





Better 
Selling 
Value 
Than Ever 



We have equipped our Stee! BatJhs with Pressed Steel Removable 
Legs and 3 inch Roll Rim around the top, for which we have 
secured a Canadian Patent- This Roll Rim adds greatly to the 
selling value of 



TWEED 



ENAMELLED 
STEEL 



BATHS 



They now look like the expensive cast enamel baths but are the 
same price as before. Our new patent Roll Rim Enamelled Steel 
Baths are now ready for shipment — Order samples. 

he Steel Trough & Machine Co. Ltd. Tweed, Ont. 

Toronto Office — 220 King St. W. A. R. Wooldridge, Representative. 
Montreal Office — 10 Victoria St. G. M. Price. Representative. 



Plumbers and Steamfitters- 

There is only one kind of satisfactory tool 
and that is one that is in perfect working 
order. Inefficient tools are a direct liability 
to you. 

Gather up your broken tools to-day, send them 
to us and we will quickly put them in shape 
for you. 

CANADIAN SERVICE STATION 
FOR BEAVER TOOLS 

The Pipe Tool and Repair Co. 

Adelaide St. W. Toronto, Ont. 

Repairmen to the Canadian Plumber and Steamfitter. 




Easier to attac h 
Mor e permanen t 
Cost less 



Tapped Closet Bend 



•Mil 





WROUGHT PIPE 

Suitable for the approaching period of 
building activity, road construction, etc 
This is a line of great importance in 
making successful, profitable contracts . 
Our C. T. Brand of Wrought Pipe has 
been 

THOROUGHLY INSPECTED 

by practical, experienced men. It is tested to 600 
lbs. hydraulic pressure, and branded with our trade- 
mark. We carry this line of reliable pipe in size? 
%-in. to 4-in. Black or Galvanized. We also manu- 
facture nipples and couplings, black and galvanized, 
in all sizes. 

Ask your Jobber for C. T. Brand Wrought Pipe 

Canadian Tube and Steel Products Co., Ltd. 

Operating Canadian Tube and Iron Co., Limited 
Works at Lachine Canal, Montreal 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



BRONZE T0 BRONZE M mmh 

One of The Many Features That Go To 
Make For Lasting and Dependable Service 

DART UNIONS 



Make a joint that is proof against deterioration. 
A joint that will never loosen up and leak. 
Their permanent efficiency is due to the non- 
corrosive Bronze Face and Seat and the Heavy 
Malleable Iron Pipe Ends and Nut which will 
not stretch or pull apart under heavy pressure 
or strain. They ensure a Leak-Proof Service 
which leaves no loopholes for complaints. 

Your Jobber Sells Them 

Dart Union Co., Limited, Toronto 




A Promise Backed with Performance 
and Our Guarantee Back of it ALL 



When we tell you that the Decatur Complete Water System will 
give longer and better service than any other system made, it is 
no idle boast. 

What the Decatur has done : A Figure 300 System has run for a 
whole year — 24 hours a day without a stop, pumping on 22-ft. 
suction lift against an 80 ft. head. During this time it has pumped 
1,675,560 gallons of water. After all of this hard service it 
shows no decrease in volume, pressure or efficiency. It is still 
running day and night. No repairs or attention of any kind other 
than regular oiling has been given the outfit. 

Our liberal guarantee makes it perfectly safe for you to get one 
of these outfits for demonstration and your profits on sales are 
particularly generous. 

Send for catalogue and full information. 



The Smart Turner Machine Co. 

LIMITED 

Hamilton - Canada 



Something New 



The Teck Flush Valve 



Today we are making- in our plant the New 
Teck Flush Valve. 

Here, truly, is a flush valve that is far from 
the ordinary run of such equipment. 

Note carefully the following points of super- 
iority: — Simplicity in construction and posi- 
tive operation. Can be connected to any type 
of closet bowl. Cannot be held open to waste 
water. Can be regulated for any length of 
flush without shutting off water. Will not 
waste water in event of dirt lodging in relief 
valve. Not necessary to take down the whole 
valve in case dirt lodges in by-pass, only re- 
move two screws. 

In every respect this valve upholds and en- 
hances the reputation that has been always 
maintained by the Gait Brass Company, 
Limited. Use it on your next job. 

Your jobber sells it. 



Gait Brass Company Limited 

Gait :: Ontario 





Plumber and Steam fitter of Canada 



Vol. XVII. 



PUBLICATION OFFICE, TORONTO, MARCH 15, 1923 



No. 6 




"Emco" Disc Valves 




^HE "Emco" standard of excellence 
is maintained in "Emco" Valves. 
In the manufacture of these valves we 
are mindful of the fact that conven- 
ience and fuel economy are the great 
essentials. 

The superior construction of the 
"Emco" A-840 Disc Valve has firmly 
established itself with engineers be- 
cause of the service it renders under 
constant pressure. This design is ap- 
proved and registered by Government 
Inspectors for a pressure of 175 pounds. 

Carried in stock by all the best 
jobbers. 

Empire Brass Mfg. Co., Ltd. 

LONDON and TORONTO, CANADA 



] 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 




Plumbers! 

Pussyfoot 
Tanks 

are exceptionally cheap for present 
booking. 

Many Jobbers have taken advantage 
of the prevailing low prices, and 

"Pussyfoot" Closet Tanks 





Simple 
Silent 

Serviceable 



Pussyfoot 

SIMPLEX VALVE 

are the Best value any Plumber can buy. 

DEMAND these from your Jobber and get 
the benefit of the highest Efficiency and 
greatest Value in your Tank requirements. 

Guaranteed in Every Way 
Bay from Your Jobber 



THE CANADA METAL COMPANY 

LIMITED 



Montreal Hamilton TORONTO Winnipeg Vancouver 



March 15, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



l 




Installed in Half a Day 

Griffith's All Metal Septic Tanks 

You make immediate connections to a Griffith Septic Tank — at 
once you have a perfect working job. 

There are no delays, no coming back a second time, no further 
dependence on masons or bricklayers— the installation of a 
Griffith Tank is purely a plumber's job— you do it ALL. 

Griffith's tanks are fully approved by Provincial authorities and 
can be had in a wide range of sizes in both Syphon and Overflow 
types, suitable for homes, schools and factories. 

When in doubt put your installation problems up to us; we main- 
tain a service department just to straighten out these little 
matters, and we will cheerfully send you a sketch making clear 
any doubtful points. 

Write to-day for catalogue and dealer's price list. 

T. G. GRIFFITH & COMPANY 

Manufacturers and Sanitary Engineers 
165 King St. E. - Toronto, Ontario 




Take no cTwwtces — buy the advertised lines. 




Merit Has No Substitute 

"That used to be a good make but they have started to 
cheapen it now." 

How many times have you heard a similar expression? 

It means that another manufacturer has attempted to sub- 
stitute reputation for merit — the beginning of the end for 
a one-time quality product. 

To win a reputation for building the best automatic gas 
water heater is one thing — to hold that reputation is another. 

During the quarter of a century which measures our busi- 
ness life, we have earned the enviable reputation of building 
only quality water heaters. To "rest on our oars" now 
would be breaking faith with you who have shared in our 
efforts and our success. 

Nothing but quality endures. 

We will therefore continue to build into RUUD Auto- 
matic Water Heaters only those things which make for 
lasting quality and service. 



A new catalog on Ruud Multi-Coil 
Storage Systems is now ready — 
Write for your copy. 



Ruud Manufacturing Company 

474-476 BATHURST STREET - TORONTO, CANADA 




It pays to buy advertised lines. 



March 15, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 




The Anthes Syphon 

is the heart of 
the Disposal System 

A sound, scientific principle 
operates the Anthes Syphon. 

It is fundamentally simple; no 
moving parts to get out of 
order.- It will not corrode, 
rust nor wear out. 

An Anthes Syphon once in- 
stalled lasts a lifetime. 



Anthes Soil Pipe 

Costs No More 
Than Inferior Pipe 



Replacements and repairs will rapidly ab- 
sorb any immediate saving on tile pipe, or 
iron pipe of unknown quality. 

Anthes Soil Pipe, while no more expen- 
sive than substitutes, lives up to its prom- 
ise of thorough endurance. 

The name "Anthes" branded on everv 
length of our soil pipe is the sign of its ob- 
ligation to give lasting service. 



Guard your hardly won good will and protect your clients- 
recommend and specify Anthes Known Quality Soil Pipe. 



Anthes Foundry 

Limited 

Toronto and Winnipeg 



Manufacturers of Cast Iron SoilfPipe and Fittings 




n 



1 &&®^-i»tt?<iW&*^ 



Merchandise advertised here in 0. K. 



4 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 15, 1923 






THE PIPE WRENCH THAT FITS ALL JOBS 

r.it. Ft-;.i-.-..:rv 4. i ■ . ; , 



liny goods that arc open to the light of publicity. 



March 15, 1923 sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 




6 



Sanitary' Engineer. Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 15, 1923 




Where 9 s That Price? 

Loose sheets — envelope backs — note books of doubtful value ...... 

How often have you fussed and fumed looking for the elusive price to 
complete that estimate? 

Supplant all such uncertainty and its attendant worries by calling in 
your Positive Price Advisor, ALLPRISER. 

All day, any time, ALLPRISER is instantly available. It checks you 
up from every angle, instils new confidence and gives both your cus- 
tomer and yourself a square deal. 

Write Today 

K. B. Allison 

4 Irwin Avenue - Toronto 




Fig: VV-222 





Fig. E-192 



SMART-TURNER 

Steam Power 

AND 

Centrifugal Pumps 

Fig. 144 

Fig. W-222 illustrates one of our small direct connected, 
electrically driven centrifugal pumps. 

Fig. 144 shows a duplex, packed piston pump, which type 
can be furnished in a wide range of sizes. 

Fig. E-192 shows a triplex power pump, for operation 
either by belt, or direct connected to motor. 



Send for catalogues of the above lines, also Domestic Water 
Supply Systems. Steam Specialties, Feed Water Heaters, etc. 



The Smart-Turner Machine Co. Ltd. 

Hamilton - Canada 



The unknown brand is probably second grade — buy advertised lines. 



March 15, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



7 



SANITARY ENGINEER 

PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER OF CANADA 

ESTABLISHED 1907 PUBLISHED TWICE MONTHLY 

Vol. XVII PUBLICATION OFFICE: TORONTO, MARCH 15, 1923 No. 6 



CONTENTS 

Some Income Tax Problems Raised 9 

Shows That Plumbing Installations Pay Big Dividends 10 

Canadian Society Convention in June 11 

Rural Sewage Disposal Systems for Apartment Houses and Stores 12 

York Township Plumbers Discuss By-law 13 

Probiems of Hydro Pneumatic Water Systems 14 

This is the Gas Age— Why? 15 

"The Final Round in Landing Old Sigh Low for a Compleat 

Plumbing Job" 16 

Oblique Angled Branch Pipe Patterns 19 

Editorial Comment 20 

Minute Message by Frank Stockdale 21 

News Notes From Coast to Coast 22 

Current Market Quotations — Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 25-32 



The MacLean Publishing Company, Ltd. 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN, President. H. T. HUNTER, Vice-President. 

H. V. TYRRELL, General Manager. 

Publishers of Sanitary Engineer. Hardware and Metal, The Financial Post, MaeLean's Magazine, 
Canadian Grocer, (Dry Goods Review, Men's Wear Review, Canadian Printer and Publisher, 
Bookseller and Stationer. Canadian Machinery and Manufacturing News, Power House, Canadian 
Foundryman. Canadian Shipping and Marine Engineering News. Canadian Automotive Trade 

Journal, Druggists' Weekly. 
Cable Address : Macpubco, Toronto : Atabek, London, Eng. 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter of Canada 

Published on the First and Fifteenth of Each Month 

Office of Publication : 143-153 University Avenue, Toronto, Canada. 
GEO. D. DAVIS. Manager. 

H. L. SOUTHALL. Managing Editor. N. A. KEARNS, Contributing Editor. 

F. R. McKINLEY, Associate Editor O. W. KOTHE, Contributing Editor. 

O T MARTIN Associate Editor. EDWIN NEWSOME, Technical Editor. 



CHIEF OFFICES 

CANADA— Montreal. Southam Bldg.. 128 Bleury St.. Phone Plateau 946. Toronto, 143-153 University Ave, Tele- 
phone Adel. 5740 ; Winnipeg, 810 Confederation Life Bldg., Telephone A. 3773. 

GREAT BRITAIN— London, The MacLean Company of Great Britain, Limited, 88 Fleet Street, EC. E. J. Dodd, 
Director, Telephone Central 12960. Cable Address: Atabek. London, England. 

UNITED STATES— 'New York 1606 St. James Bldg., 1133 Broadway, Telephone Watkins 5869 ; Boston, C. L. Mor- 
ton, Room 734. Old South Buildings, Telephone Main 1024; Chicago, 405-6 Transportation B'ldg., 608 So. 
Dearborn St., Wabash 9430. 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE— Canada, £2.00 a year; Great Britain, South Africa, and West Indies, 8s. 6d. a year; 
United States, $2.50 a year; other countries. $3.00 a year. Single copies, 10 cents. Invariably in advance. 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 15, l'.»2:j 





One Man 
Does the Work of Two 



Why This Threading 
Tool is Better 



"Toledo" Geared Adjustable 

Threading Tool, No. 2'/ 2 ; capacity, 

2'/2 to 6 in., inclusive; weight, 120 

lbs. , . 

In operation the cutters open out to cut the tapered thread. 
The dies cut only with the mouth of the cutter. Lead screw 
insures perfect pitch and form of thread. The machines are 
light and compact, have a minimum of working parts, strong 
and durable. All threads Ya" to 12" are threaded at one cut 
and by one man. 

Made in Canada Leading Supply Houses will quote You 



Try Jardine or Toledo First 

A. B. Jardine & Co., 



Winnipeg and West: 
STANLEY BROCK, LTD., 

Winnipeg, Man., Calgary, Alta 
Vancouver, British Columbia. 



Limited 

HESPELER, ONT. 



Brockvil'e and East: 
J. R. DEVEREAUX & CO., 

New Birks Bldg.. Montreal, Que. 



Ontario. West of Brockville: W. H CUNNINGHAM & HILL. 269 Richmond St West. Toronto, Ontario. 



Name 



Mail this coupon for a Catalogue. 



Address 



Sanitary Engineer 



We are Canadian Distributors for 



The Famous "B & C" Lines 

of Floor and Ceiling Plates and Air Valves 




No. 17 

Sizes V 2 to 2 





No. 16 

Sizes % to 2 
with set screws 




No. -15 

Sizes % to 6" 



In addition to lines shown, we stock loose 
key and milled wheel air vents and a com- 
plete line of Sanitary and Heating special- 
ties. 



No. 211 



W. H. CUNNINGHAM & HILL, LIMITED 



269 West Richmond Street 

Western Canada Representative: 
W. F. HILL, Jr., 
268 Carlton St.. Winnipeg. Man., Phone A. 6237. 



326 Selby St. 



TORONTO, CANADA 

Eastern Canada Representative: 
A. H. WHEELER, 
Westmount. Montreal. Que., Phone Westmount 13 




No. 4 Automatic 



It pays to buy advertised lines. 



Established 
1907 

Circulates 
Throughout 
Canada 



VOL. XVII. 



Plumber and Steam filler of Canada 




TORONTO, MARCH 15, 1923 



Published 
First 
and 
Fifteenth 
of Month 



No. 6 



Some Income Tax Problems Raised 

Western Ontario Plumber Asks re Value of Property on Which 
Depreciation is Figured and Whether Depreciation is Considered 
a Liability — Are Bad Debts a Liability? 



EDITOR'S NOTE: — From enquiries being made of Sani- 
tary Engineer, a number of plumbers are having difficulty in 
making out their Income Tax statements which must be in by 
the end of April. A number of enquiries have been made 
during the past week which raised some interesting points 
which will be outlined herewith: 



o 



NE Western Ontario plumber writes: Our statement 
of assets and liabilities for the last year shows the 
following: 



Real Estate $ 9,730.00 

Fixtures and Trucks 1,640.00 



$11,370.00 

Less: 

Depreciation 

2V2 per annum on buildings value . . $3,910 

= $97.75 
10% per annum on fixtures and trucks 

= $164.00 261.75 

$11,108.25 

For the second year, should $11,108.25 be considered the 
value on which to calculate depreciation, and should this fig- 
ure be shown as the asset value in a statement of assets and 
liabilities at the end of the second year? Should the de- 
preciation of $261.75 be considered as a liability? 

Answer. — The statement at the end of the first year is 
not correct, but should have taken the following form: 
STATEMENT OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 
As at the end of Business Year. 

ASSETS — 

Stock of merchandise on hand at cost price. 

Real Estate, Buildings $3,910.00 

Real Estate, Land 5,820.00 

Machinery and Tools 

Furniture and Fixtures and Trucks 1,640.00 

LIABILITIES— 

Accounts Payable $ 

Depreciation Reserves: — 

Buildings 2%% per annum 97.75 

Fixtures and Trucks 10% per annum 164.00 

We see here that the depreciation, which was charged in 
the profit and loss statement, is treated as a liability, and is 
termed "Depreciation Reserve," or sometimes "Reserve for 



Depreciation." The amount is actually a setting aside of a 
portion of the surplus which would otherwise be available for 
distribution to the proprietor or proprietors. By this setting 
aside, the danger of distributing, as profits, the amount that 
should rightly be held in the business for replacement pur- 
poses is overcome. 

There is a highly important side issue here. Sound busi- 
ness demands that a balance of cash, some easily convertible 
investment, should be maintained at all times equal to the 
amount of reserve for depreciation. A business following this 
policy will never find itself in the position of wanting new 
buildings or fixtures — to replace those which have become old- 
fashioned, or worn out — and having to restrain its development 
and expansion because no money is available. 

Depreciation should always be calculated on the full asset 
value (less a reasonable allowance for scrap value), irre- 
spective of any amount which has been charged against profit 
and loss in that, or in previous years, and set up as a reserve 
for depreciation. If the depreciation is calculated on the 
diminished value, the following results: 



Amount charged to 
profit and loss 
10% 

9% 
8% 



Amount on which 
dep'n is figured 
1st year 100% 
2nd year 100%— 10%=90% 

3rd year 100%— 20% =80% 

It becomes an arithmetical impossibility to ever reach a 
reserve which is equal to the full value of the asset. 

Bad Debts 

Question. — Bad debts of $136.00 have been charged in 
trading accounts during the year. Should these be taken in as 
a liability? 

Answer. — There is no liability whatever in connection with 
actual losses on account of bad debts. If no provision has been 
made regularly, it must form a direct charge against profits. 

Provision is frequently made periodically, by setting aside 
a small percentage of gross sales, say 1% or 2%. This 
amount is charged against profit and loss, and credited to a 
"Reserve for Bad Debts" account. This reserve is always a 
liability. Then, when an account must be written off, the 
charge is made to the reserve account instead of against profit 
and loss. In this way, if good judgment is used in determining 
the amount to be set up periodically, and in extending credits, 
the business is preserved from large losses in any one year, 
and a more equitable basis for comparing the results of any 
one year with another, is obtained. 



10 



Sanitary Engineer. Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 15, 1923. 



Shows That Plumbing Installations Pay 

Big Dividends 

Cook & Donohue, Plumbers of Stratford, Ont, Believe in Looking 
After Complete Contracts for Installations of Plumbing and Heat- 
ing Equipment— Satisfied Women Customers Are Big Advertisers 
—Recommend Only the Best in Repairs 



COOK & DONOHUE of Stratford, 
Ontario, believe that the ideal 
plan for corralling the greatest 
volume of business which carries maxi- 
mum profits is to be able to look after 
the complete contract, plumbing, heat- 
ing and electrical work. With this end 
in view they have equipped their shop, 
show rooms and display window so that 
prospective customers may at all times 
see just how the merchandise offered 
will look in their own homes. 

A Big Talking Point 

"It is indeed a big talking point as 
well as a selling point when we can in- 
vite a man and his wife, who are- busy 
with plans for a new home, or plans 
for improving their present home, down 
to our shop and let them see exactly 
what an installation such as they con- 
template will look like. It usually 
means that the sale is at least half 
made. Sometimes, of course, they wish 
to select fixtures or equipment that is 
more expensive, or sometimes less ex- 
pensive, or change an arrangement to 
suit their own requirements, but the 
fact remains that when we can show 
them the equipment complete and set 
up just as it would be in their own 
home, they appreciate it and our service 
and it only remains to arrange details." 

Improving Homes 

A glance at the business handled by 
Cook and Donohue in the past few years 
shows that not only city people but 
dwellers in the rural sections are con- 
stantly improving their homes. It is 
quite true that many of them make im- 
provements over a period of months or 
perhaps years, putting in perhaps a 
bathroom first, then heating and later 
electrical service, but the fact that they 
come back to Cook and Donohue for the 
entire contract proves the correctness 
of the firm's policy. As far as builders 
of new homes in the city are concerned, 
it usually works out without question, 
that by taking the complete contract, 
Cook and Donohue are enabled to give 
a figure that is so attractive that they 
secure the entire work and make a 
nice profit. 

While they regard good work and 
satisfied customers as the best adver- 
tisment any business can have, Cook 
and Donohue believe that their means 
of attracting those interested in im- 
proving their homes is by their store 
and window displays. 



"We give careful attention to our 
windows and our store," said Mr. Cook 
to Sanitary Engineer, "and we find that 
it pays well. We aim to keep our store 
display so clean that any man can come 
at any time with his wife and get ideas 
and talk over with us proposed install- 
ations. If the men in the trade only 
realized it this is a most important 
matter. Women are not at all anxious 
to enter the average plumber's estab- 
lishment and for good reasons. We see 
to it that our stock is kept clean and 
in perfect order and that there is no 
merchandise littered about for people 
to step over or fall over. We frequent- 
ly receive compliments from women who 
have come down with their husbands to 
talk over plans with us, and in not a 
few instances they have sent women 
friends to us with resultant good busi- 
ness." 

Please The Women 

The firm believes that it is a most im- 
portant matter to please the women. 
They have to spend most of their time 
in the homes and they like to have nice 
homes and up-to-date fixtures and 
equipment. In supplying these, Cook 
and Donohue find there is excellent busi- 
ness and profits and the best kind or ad- 
vertising for them. 

"Women are great advertisers," said 
Mr. Cook. "When they get a nice home 
with nice fixtures and equipment they 
never tire of telling their friends about 
it, and they don't forget to tell who 



GOOD BUSINESS MAXIMS OF 
THIS FIRM 

1. Be equipped to attend to the complete 
contract. 

2. Rural field is worthy of increasing at- 
tention. 

3. Windows and showroom indicate im- 
provement that can be made in homes. 

4. Make plumber s showroom a place to 
attract rather than repel prospects. 

5. Make strong appeal to women. They 
are great advertisers if satisfied. 

6. Emphasize that equipment pays for 
itself in service spread over years. 

7. Recommend only the best in both new 
equipment and repairs. 



put them in or that the price was ! 
reasonable and the work satisfactory 
and so on. We ask for no better ad- i 
vertising than this." 

The firm finds also that home owners 
and home builders, both men and wo- 
men, frequently buy better equipment 
and fixtures than they had intended as 
a result of seeing the store displays. 

Want Them Good 

In this connection the firm points out 
that the installation to be made is one 
which is going to pay for itself many 
times over in long years of real service, 
and that it would be a foolish policy 
to put in something not in keeping with 
the rest of the equipment for the sake 
of a few dollars. 

This same policy of recommending 
only the best is followed out in con- 
nection with repairs. If a workman is 
sent out to make a repair and finds 
that the part is worn out and that it 
would be bad business to repair it, he 
reports to the firm, with the result that 
the matter is taken up at once with the 
owner. It is pointed out that while 
the part can be repaired, that the job 
at best would only be temporary and 1 
therefore unsatisfactory, and that it 
would be better all round to put in a 
new part. Cook and Donchue find that 
the great majority of their customers 
appreciate and follow out their sug- | 
gestions along these lines, 

Say Business Good 

The firm has been kept busy all the 
time and is looking for continued good ! 
business. There is a big and profitable 
field for them they believe in following 
out their policy of going after the com- I 
plete plumbing, heating and electrical 
contracts for new homes, and homes and 
other places which are being improved. 

Location, they believe, is an important 
factor in obtaining business and it pays 
to be where the greatest number of 
people can see displays which are made, 
and come easily to the shop. With this 
object in view, Cook and Donohue have 
their location on the main business thor- 
oughfare of Stratford, and they aim to 
keep their displays and store worthy, 
not only of their location but of the 
firm's standards. 

As will be seen from the illustration 
the firm finds it well worth while to 
stock electric irons, grills, fans and a 
large assortment of plain and fancy 
globes. Sales which have resulted when 



March 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER, PLUMBER AND StEAMFITTER 11 




of Cook & Donohue, plumbers, of Stratford, Ont., as illustrated herewith. Croups are shown indicating the manner 

in which the equipment will look in the customer's home. 



home owners came in to discuss heating, 
plumbing and electrical work have been 
very satisfactory. 

The electrical display at night or when 
it is turned on in the day time is an im- 
posing one, and has been directly re- 
sponsible for the sale of much merchan- 
dise that otherwise would not have been 
purchased. Fancy dining room lamps 
and reading lamps are frequently sold 
for gift purposes. The firm's splendid 
display of bath room fixtures has also 
meant increased turnover in these lines. 
Sales are made both to those building 
new homes and to those who alreadv 



have bath rooms in their homes. By 
keeping bath room fixtures where they 
can be seen all the time, Cook and Dono- 
hue have developed an all year trade 
in them. Some people who own homes 
come in and buy one piece at a time un- 
til they have a complete set of fixtures. 

Laundry tubs are big sellers, as every 
woman who knows anything about them 
or has seen them in a friend's home 
want them. With the tubs right out on 
display, it usually requires very little 
sales talk to have the man and woman 
who are building a new home or are 
making improvements, include them in 
the contract. 



Canadian Society Convention in June 

After Missing General Convention Last Year, 
Parent Society in Canada is to Meet in Montreal 
This June 



M 



ONTREAL.— At a meeting of 
the sub-committee of the Execu- 
tive of the Canadian Society of 
Domestic Heating and Sanitary Engin- 
eers held at the Builders' Exchange of- 
fices preliminary arrangements were 
made for the annual convention of the 
Society, which will be held in Montreal 
next June. Although the constitution of 
the Society provides for an annual con- 



vention to be held in June of each year, 
their last meeting was held at Quebec 
two years ago. 

Last year, owing to the illness of the 
president and the great amount of busi- 
ness going forward it was decided by the 
association to forego their convention. 
At the last meeting of the Master 
Plumbers' Association it was urged that 
the convention should be held during the 



coming June, and an invitation was ex- 
tended for the meeting to be held here, 
which was accepted, the second week in 
June being suggested. 

Before finally fixing the date it was 
considered advisable to communicate 
with the whole Executive of the Society, 
comprising the presidents of the various 
Provincial Associations. The secretary 
was therefore instructed to secure their 
views as to the date as soon as possible. 
A further meeting of the sub-committee 
will be held next week to make definite 
plans for the convention. 

Those at the meeting were A. Latour- 
elle, president of the Canadian Society 
of Domestic Heating and Sanitary En- 
gineers; George Delaney, president of 
the Montreal Master Plumbers' Associ- 
ation, John Watson, P. C. Ogilvie, and 
D. K. Trotter, secretary. 



PLUMBER GOES TO BOSTON 

St. John, N.B. — H. H. Rouse, formerly 
a plumbing contractor in St. John, N.B., 
is now located in Boston. Recently, a 
young son of Mr. Rouse was killed by 
an automobile in the Dorchester district 
of Boston, where the family is residing. 
Rouse was one of the first plumbing 
contractors in St. John to use striking 
advertising as a means of acquiring 
business. 



12 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 15, 1923 



Rural Sewage Disposal Systems for Apartment 

Houses and Stores 

Suburban Apartment Houses and Stores Equipped With Disposal 
System — The Ground Slopes Towards the Building — System 
Has Been in Operation Several Years 

Written for Sanitary Engineer by EDWIN NEWSOME, Consulting Engineer 



THAT there are exceptions to every 
rule should ever be accepted. In 
all the previous articles on this 
subject of sewage disposal systems for 
rural homes, two rules have been laid 
down as almost hard and fast, and un- 
der conditions previously considered 
those rules must be carried out to the 
letter. I refer to the rules that the main 
trunk line of a sewage disposal bed 
should not have a greater fall than one 
inch in ten feet and that all the laterals 
be laid perfectly level. The first of 
these rules will from time to time be 
altered to make way for conditions, 



though open jointed laterals MUST al- 
ways be laid level. Not, however, al- 
ways in a straight line. Sometimes 
rocks or tree roots would require that 
the laterals be run round these or other 
obstacles. 

Then there is the question of contour 
of the ground, for instance, the ground 
to be used as a disposal area may be a 
hillside sloping away from the building. 
Some different method of laying the pip- 
ing would have to be followed out. 

Sometimes the ground to be used 
slopes up from the house or building, as 
is shown in the accompanying plan and 



elevation drawings, which, by the way, 
is an actual job installed over two years 
ago not far from Toronto. The situa- 
tion found was as follows: 

The land was bought, and it looked as 
if a large scheme of sewers and drains 
would be carried out. The apartments 
and stores were built and ready for 
occupancy, when the question of sew- 
age disposal system had to be evolved, 
and the writer was consulted in the 
matter. 

The ground was about as ideal as 
possible, good gravelly loam and lots of 
room. The septic tanks were constructed 



The Pifres U/ere 10 Feet Apart Bulk/here flrea Is Limited Pipes Mud Hoi Be C/oserThon 3 Feeh 
i 




Iroyhf h/i/h 



ELEVATION 



3 inch trough! I ron Deliv/er^j Pi^e 
From Purn^To Distributing Yonk 

-Dosing Chambers 

■S#iC Tanks 




March 15, 1923 SANITARY ENGINEER. PLUMBER AND STEAMFITTER 



13 



in accordance with data already referred 
to in previous articles. The dosing 
chamber had holes cut through as also 
had the cultivating chambers of the 
two tanks, so as to make sure of the 
various fluids being equalized in height 
and bacterial conditions. The dosing 
chamber then had an extension built to 
it, to make a small pump-house to house 
the sewage lift pump. This job also re- 
quired a large distributing tank at the 
top of the hill, the slope being about 
one foot in three, quite a slope. 

The sewage lift forces the sewage 
through the pipe (see illustration) up 
into the distributing tank at the top, and 
main pipes laid in the manner shown. 
The reader should follow the line of pipe 
when reading this article and note how 
the sewage is conveyed from one side 
of the main pipes with the laterals al- 
ternately. 

Action Described 

For example, the sewage is pumped 
or forced up through the wrought iron 
pipe into the distributing tank. The 
sewage then flows down through the 
glazed tile pipe until it reaches the first 
clay tile bend, then it flows on into the 
line of laterals connected to the bend 
referred -to. 

When this line of laterals is full, the 
sewage backs up to the first glazed tile 
pipe branch and down to the second 
glazed tile bend, filling the laterals con- 
nected to the second bend, and again the 
sewage backs up as soon as the second 
line of laterals is full of sewage and so 
on until all the sewage has been pumped 
out of the dosing chamber into the dis- 
tributing tank and out into field tile 
disposal bed. 

Increase Allowance of 4-inch Field Tile 

When such a plan of field tile piping 
has to be adopted, great care must be 
exercised in seeing that not less than 
20 per cent, more open field tile laterals 
be furnished, because, should there be 
an extra number of persons come to stay 
in the apartments than was at first made 
allowance for, the situation would be 
serious. The lower lines of laterals 
would get all the surplus sewage and in 
all likelihood the extra amount of sew- 
age would wash the ground up or the 
ground would become soggy and very 
unsanitary conditions set up, so it can- 
not be too strongly emphasized that not 
less than 20 per cent, more field tile be 
laid, and this should be added to the 
laterals situated nearest to the distrib- 
uting chamber or tank at the top of the 
hill. 

Keep Motor Dry and Free From 
Dampness 

In constructing the house over the 
dosing chamber to house the sewage 
pump, there should be no gases allowed 
to escape into the housing. The damp 
air and gases are liable to damage the 
electric motor and if it is at all possi- 
ble some means should be found to keep 
the little place warm and free from 
dampness. A small heating coil or sec- 
tion of a radiator would be good. Under 
no consideration, however, should any 



method of heating be adopted that would 
make a flame, because many times the 
gases from a sewage disposal system 
are highly inflammable as well as ex- 
plosive. 

Ventilate Each Compartment 

The dosing chamber and cultivating 
chamber must be ventilated in the same 
manner as is adopted in a regular septic 
tank and as shown in previous instal- 
lations. And it will also be noted that, 
as there are four outlets or house drains 
discharging into the two cultivating 
chambers, they are all separate. 

Upon no account should house drains 
be connected together so as to make 
fewer openings into the tank. This is 
a very bad mistake. Each soil pipe stack 
at least should run separately into the 
cultivating chambers, and a cast' iron Y 
with cleanout fitted to the house drain 
so as to make the work of clearing any 
obstacle an easy matter, when it lies 
on its back so that a rod could be run 
into the Y clear of bends or other fit- 
tings, and under no consideration should 
offsets in such drains be made except by 
using the regular one-eighth or one-six- 
teenth bend. 

Same Number of Field Tile Pipe 

In this installation, as in others, the 
amount of field tile pipe for the work 



AT THE last meeting of the Master 
Plumbers' Association of York 
Township, held at Hunt's, Yonge 
St., Toronto, the new plumbing by-law 
for the township was discussed very ful- 
ly. This by-law has been endorsed in 
principle by the Township Council but 
had not been officially sanctioned at the 
time the meeting was held. Such sanc- 
tion is expected before the next meeting, 
the voting on the matter being held up 
while some minor revisions are being 
made. 

Future meetings of the association will 
be held on the second Tuesday in each 
month. The Educational Committee 
plans a discussion of bookkeeping meth- 
ods and other educational matter at the 
next meeting. 

In carrying the suggested by-law to 
the Town Council, W. H. Rushton, head- 
ing a deputation of the Master Plumbers' 
Association, made a plea for "a plumb- 
ing by-law that we can respect and un- 
derstand." 

"It is a big matter to go into and the 
plumbers should not be forced to agitate 
for such things as inspection because, al- 
though it looks like something for the 
plumbers, it is really for the benefit of 
the people of the township. We want a 
by-law with penalties that will be en- 
forced," he said. 



depends upon the amount in gallons or 
cubic feet of sewage entering the dozing 
chamber and eventually to be taken care 
of in the field tile. As stated before, 13 
lineal feet of 4-inch field tile is needed 
to each cubic foot of sewage, or about 
equal to 2 lineal feet of 4-inch field tile 
to each gallon with, in this case, an ad- 
dition of 20 per cent. more. 

The Distributing Tank Covered and 
Kept Warm 

In a system such as described, adopt- 
ing the plan shown, care should be taken 
that the distributing tank is kept free 
from frost if at all possible, as the tank, 
being very cold, is liable to chill the 
effluent and in that way may likely in- 
terfere with the proper working of the 
bacteria in the ground. Furthermore, 
some provision must be made to ensure 
the draining of all the effluent in the 
discharge pipe back into the dozing 
chamber. If this pipe is left full and 
a severe and sudden drop in tempera- 
ture is experienced, the cold sewage will 
not permit the bacteria to work and it 
may be possible that this delivery pipe 
may, if left full of sewage, become 
frozen solid. The Sanitary Engineer 
courts all or any inquiries from our 
readers and would rather help out first 
than help clean up an unsanitary job. 
(Continued in next issue) 



Reeve Jury. — "A by-law like the city 
by-ilaw would answer the purpose, be- 
sides the advantage of having uniformity 
in the township and city by-laws." 

Deputy Reeve R. H. McGregor — "If 
we adopted the city by-law, would it not 
have the effect of throwing a lot of 
plumbers in the township out of work 
who could not immediately conform with 
the necessary standards required?" 

Deputy Reeve J. Galbraith — "If the 
plumbers get the by-law they want they 
will have a closed corporation and will 
be able to charge any prices that they 
wish." 

Council will meet the plumbers later 
to discuss the situation. 



PORT CREDIT WATER BY-LAW 
PASSED. 

Port Credit, Ont. — After a session 
lasting over four hours, Council finally, 
wound up the town water by-law. All 
of the various rules and regulations 
governing the water supply were care- 
fully gone over before the by-law was 
given its second and third readings. 

With the by-law in perfect order and 
the rules as to rates and service agreed 
upon, everything is now ready for the 
supply to be turned on. This, however, 
will not be done for at least three weeks. 



Early Sanction of New Plumbing By-law 

Master Plumbers' Association of York Township 
Makes Minor Revisions in Suggested By-law Be- 
fore Submission to County Council 



14 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



March 15, 1923 



Problems Involved in Hydro Pneumatic 

Water Pumps 

Average Buyer of Water Supply System Will Pay Higher Price 
if Good Value Can be Shown — Minimum of 10 Lbs. Pressure 
is Lowest for Satisfactory Use — Avoiding "Air Binding" in Pump 

Written for Sanitary Engineer by M. Quinn, National Equipment Cot, Toronto 



THE hydro pneumatic system'; of 
water supply, which, until ten or 
twelve years ago, was practically 
unknown in Canada, though the prin- 
ciple had been in successful operation 
for many years previously in the United 
States, has now become part and parcel 
of almost every plumbing installation 
beyond the limits of the regular city or 
town water works system. 

While the principle involved is an ex- 
tremely simple one, there is a great var- 
iety of conditions under which the 
plumber is called upon to apply it, and 
a careful investigation has convinced us 
that a very large number among the 
trade are anxious to inform themselves 
fully upon the subject, and to be in a po- 
sition to obtain reliable advice regarding 
any problem, no matter how large or 
how small, with which they may oc- 
casionally be confronted. 

It is the object of this article* there- 
fore, to deal to some extent with the 
general principles underlying this sys- 
tem, and to explain the various details 
entering into its composition, having re- 
gard to the character of service requir- 
ed, source or supply, motive power, etc. 
We believe that it would not be amiss 
right here, to emphasize the necessity 
ar.d the wisdom, as a matter of good 
business, of each member of the trade 
giving careful thought to the duty that 
he owes the public in general, and his 
own clientele in particular, and perhaps 
this can be brought home more clearly 
by an analogy. 

An Analogy 

Let us assume that the reader has oc- 
casion to consult a lawyer about a mat- 
ter, improper handling of which, may 
result in very serious consequences to 
him, and that the lawyer gives an opin- 
ion based entirely upon his general re- 
collection of the law, as a result of 
which, the reader proceeds to court, and 
after being defeated at the end of very 
expensive proceedings, has to be satis- 
fied with the explanation that his coun- 
sel was unaware of certain amend- 
ments that had been made, which, had 
he taken the trouble to read his law be- 
fore he had given the off-hand opinion, 
would have entirely changed the atti- 
tude of his client, and saved him a lot 
of money. 

The point we desire to make, there- 
fore, and one which cannot be too 
strongly emphasized is, that the average 



purchaser of a water system, or, indeed, 
any other class of work that the plumber 
does, is usually quite as ignorant regard- 
ing it as the average layman is regard- 
ing the law. He depends entirely upon 
the good faith of the plumber — who is 
supposed to have a complete knowledge 
of such matters and be able to advise 
him intelligently and honestly — regard- 
ing his requirements. 

No plumber is in that position who 
has not carefully studied and compared 
the various features emphasized in con- 
nection with all of the water systems on 
the market. 

The mere fact that he put in one sys- 
tem that gave reasonable satisfaction, 
does not at all mean that some other 
system might not prove to be much 
greater value for the money, and the 
fact that any part of a system works 
satisfactorily for a few months, is not in 
any sense evidence that it will not be a 
wreck in a comparatively short time, 
when perhaps any one of several other 
types of system could be depended upon 
to give service almost indefinitely. 

For example, during the last few 
years, at least three concerns right in 
Canadian territory, specializing in this 
kind of equipment, have failed for one 
reason or another; some because they 
sought to sell to the public the lowest 
priced goods that could be produced 
others because the design of various 
parts entering into their units, was 
faulty, and not based upon either exper- 
ience or good engineering practice, but 
in all cases, the poor unfortunate 
plumber who installed the equipment, 
was ultimately "the goat." 

Will Pay Higher Price 

There is no doubt whatever, that the 
average consumer is willing to pay a 
somewhat higher price if he can be 
shown that he is getting full value. It 
is equally true that if what he buys from 
you "falls down," and he learns subse- 
quently that you were in a position to 
furnish something better, then you will 
not only have a lost customer, but you 
will have made an enemy. 

And remember this, if you install an 
absolutely high class outfit for your cus- 
tomer, show him what he has, and make 
him pay for it, you will have provided, 
at his expenses, a kind of advertising 
that cannot be bought with money. You 
cannot get a "boost" anywhere, like that 
from a satisfied customer. 



Generally speaking, the hydro pneu- 
matic system of water supply, may be 
likened to the ordinary syphon bottle 
in which the fluid is contained under 
considerable air or gas pressure, and in 
order that this pressure may be main- 
tained until all the contents of the bot- 
tle are drawn off, the opening into the 
discharge pipe is at the very lowest 
point of the receptacle. Otherwise, air 
pressure would escape the moment the 
valve is opened, and the water remain. 
In other words, if a syiphon bottle is 
held upside down, and the valve is open- 
ed, all the gas will rush out, leaving 
the water in the vessel. 

It will strike the average reader as 
being quite unnecessary to explain so 
simple a fact, but the reason we do so 
is that we have seen from time to time 
a number of systems which were con- 
demned as useless, where the whole 
cause of the trouble was the connection 
of the discharge pipe into the top of the 
tank, or perhaps a safety valve or other 
contrivance put in at that point, which 
allowed the compressed air to entirely 
escape, so that right here we desire to 
make our first point, viz.: Never con- 
nect anything of any kind, whether it 
be pressure gauge, safety valve, or any 
other device, into the tank anywhere 
above the water line, with the single ex- 
ception of the top water glass mounting. 

Still using the syphon bottle as an ex- 
ample, let us assume that a pipe con- 
nection is tapped into its side near the 
bottom and is extended up to a distance 
of several feet, and fitted at the top 
with a tap. It will be seen at once that 
if the tap is opened, the compressed air 
on the suriace of the water in the bot- 
tle will force this water down and out 
through the pipe, discharging it into 
pail. 

It will be equally clear that the great- 
er the pressure present in the bottle, the 
higher may the tap and pail be placed, 
and as water will rise 28 inches for 
every pound of pressure, it will be seen 
that where a wash basin, for example, is 
located at say 14 feet above the tank, 
the water would continue to flow at that 
point until the pressure in the tank had 
dropped to six pounds, when it would en- 
tirely cease. 

Minimum of 10 Lbs. 

In practice, however, a minimum of 
ten pounds pressure is the very lowest 
(Continued on page 18) 



15 



This is the Gas Age- Why? 

History About Gas, Where Found, When and By Whom — How 
First Used and Supplied — The Most Wonderful Romance of the 
Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 

Written specially for Sanitary Engineer by EDWIN NEWSOME, Consulting Sanitary 

and Heating Engineer 

CHAPTER I 



Let's Just Have a Personal Chat 



SAY, fellow craftsmen, I often wonder how it is that .we, {once plumbers and gasfitters) sanitary and heat- 
ing' engineers the world over, are the greatest rainbow chasers on earth. We are, that'e sure. We scrap 
about rules and regulations, about the qualifications of a man as to his ability to install a job properly, and 
lose sight of the fact that labor, work done, mid so on. has the least value in the eyes of the general public. We 
have fought gas companies the world over and as a matter of fact gasfitting was first and foremost the founda- 
tion of our industry. This statement is so obvious that it cannot be refuted. 

To-day, gas appliances are becoming more popular than ever, and who have we to thank"? Gas manufac- 
turers only, and if every member of our craft ivould consult his own heart, he would find that if the gas industry 
had depended upon us as a craft, there would be no gas industry, and, if such a condition did exist, the human 
race would be lacking one of the greatest servants known to science. The man ivho does not put forth every effort 
to create a greater demand for gas and gas appliances is, by his sins of omission, evading responsibility he little 
' realizes. 

Science, that spirit in man which is ever co-operating with the great Creator, is doing its best to tell man that 
some day, and not at too distant a date, that the gasification of ALL fuels will be the real beginning of the real 
gas age. It is coming and all the powers cannot stem the tide. The sooner every sanitary and heating en- 
gineer becomes convinced of this fact, the sooner will the public realize that our problems of cheap transportation, 
i cost of living, and cost of heating will be solved. 

And. now friends, let us keep together during the period in which I will act as story-teller. Let me ask 
that each one of you be my silent listener for a while, and I xvill unfold to you some wonderful things about gas, 
gas appliances, how they should be sold and used. There so don't miss oyie. and I am sure you will enjoy every one 
will be about twelve if not more articles in this series, of them, how, let's get on with the first chat. 



IN THE first place, I want it to be 
strictly understood by every reader of 
these chapters that I am a firm be- 
liever in the use of gas for fuel. I don't 
care the snap of my finger for useless, 
self-interested criticism. My whole ob- 
ject in writing these articles is, that 
you, my fellow craftsman, be told just 
all the why's and wherefore's of gas, as 
a heating element. I know I will be 
severely criticised, but what of it? I 
know well that manufacturers of coal 
fired apparatus will assume that I am 
wrong, but they are only assuming. I 
know that the manufacturers of electric 
heating apparatus will resent such state- 
ments as I will make, but what of that? 

The Great Creator never intended that 
burning coal, burning wood or using elec- 
tric energy for heating and cooking 
should be the "finale" in the art of heat- 
ing, else he would not have permitted the 
brains of the best known men of the 
age to evolve such wonderful uses for 
gas. 

The Great Creator would not have 
shown scientific research men that gas, 
the inflammable element in all combus- 
tible substances is only one of thousands 
of other valuable elements to be found 
in the things we burn up in our mad rush 



to get warm or to do things of all kinds 
that require heat. 

The day is not far distant when gas 
will be the greatest element of the age, 
it is now, but is only one-tenth exploited. 
Electricity is not in reality a heating 
energy. It is a crime, an affront to the 
maker of all things, to use electricity 
as a heating element. It is a power 
energy, and as such will cut down cost 
of production, cut down cost of trans- 
portation and as a matter of fact reduce 
the cost of living at least by one-third. 

Now, with the above statements made, 
let us begin and analyze them, let us 
delve first into the romantic story of 
gas, let us just, as it were, peep into the 
past as well as the present and future, 
and, in that way look the situation 
squarely and from all angles. 

Discovery of Gas 

In the first place comes the discovery 
of gas. Where- it was first discover- 
ed is somewhat uncertain, but as far as 
can be learned, gas was discovered 
many centuries ago. A story is told of 
a Grecian shepherd, who, while tending 
his sheep, found that some of them be- 
gan to wander about the pasture in an 



aimless, half stupified manner, when in 
one particular spot. 

He walked over to the place to find out 
the reason for this strange behaviour and 
became similarly affected by something 
coming from the ground. After recover- 
ing from the strange sensation he hur- 
ried to the village and told the neigh- 
bors of his experience. Crowds gathered 
round the place and decided that the odor 
was caused by some supernatural agency, 
because each person present appeared 
to become more talkative and light- 
headed and not only acted strangely, but 
speech became disconnected and difficult 
to understand. 

The people finally decided that they 
were in the presence of some god, and 
later appointed a priestess to keep in 
touch with this god and built a temple 
where people could procure all manner 
of advice. Thus it is said that the 
oracle of Delphi became famous. 

These Grecian experiences were no 
doubt the finding of natural gas, and 
while we at this date may laugh and 
sneer at the superstitions of those 
earlier Greek folk, yet if we were to 
look into some of our silly practices 
and superstitions, we would find that 
(Continued on page 18) 



3 Sanitary Engineer, P lumber and Stea m fitter March 15, 19S 

"The Final Round in Landing Old Sigh Low for 
A Compleat Plumbing Job" 

Jerry Meets With Unexpected Success in Bringing Old Sigh Low 
and His Wife to Look Over the Display of Plumbing Fixtures 

With apologies to Ring Lardner by MAJOR L. L. ANTHES, Managing Director, 
Anthes Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto 



Tarraboone, March 13, 1923 
Dear Friend Al: — 

I am now goin to tell you abt the 3rd 
and finel round with Sigh Low the 4th 
concessn hick. As purr my preevious 
lettrs. I had alreddy pade 2 visets 2 
his farm & the last time I got a frea 
meel & a chanct to spill my doap on 
plumbing & heating. 

"Aint you got that job landed yet?" 
sez Bill when I come back from my 2nd 
trip. 

"No I havent," I retortured, "I tolde 
you befoar that it wernt no suddin dethe 
propcsn.— Its a big job & it takes time." 

A Life Job 

"If it takes as much time 2 finish it 
as it takes you 2 land it, itll bee a life 
job," come back Bill. "2 dilay is dang- 
gerous." 

"Is zazzo," I snipped. "Well if, '2 dilay 
is danggerous, sometimes 2 delay 2 de- 
lay, is dangerous.' Witch means he hoo 
hezitates 2 hezitate is lost." 

"Howzat," sez Bill lookin puzzled like. 

"I thot it wld B 2 deap fer you," I 
sneared with satisfactn. 

"In other words, 'look B 4 you leep,' 
lest 'fooles rush inn were angles feer 
to trod'." I werent goin to let him 
think he was the only guy on erth that 
had studyed the Book of Proverbs. 
"Furthramore, 'sure & steddy wins the 
day'." Wile I had Bill gaspin at my 
perdigious lernin I ask him, "Did you 
ever heer Esops faible of the Tortus & 
the Hair? If you reember the hair 
didnent win the race." 

Wass too Long Sez Bill 

"Praps it was too long," sez Bill. 

"What?" sez I, "the race?" 

"Naw," sez Bill, "the hair! Haw 
haw, haw." & with that he dived outta 
the back dore laffin fit to splitt. 

Thats the way with some guys, jest as 
soon as you pull somethin that is 
over there heds they tries 2 retalyate 
with sum bum joak. 

Well I was sittin in the show-room 




JERRY 

Read how he landed one of the hardest 
prospects in his rural district for a compleat 
plumbing and heating job. 

figgern the next move in the great 
human drama wen hoo should come into 
the dore but Missus Sigh Low. 

I hopped up quickern scat and lifted 
my cap to her. 

Pize Makes Mouth Water 

"Good-mornin Missus Low," I sez, "I'm 
awfully glad to see you agen. Them 
pize of yourn makes my mouth water 
every time I thinks of them." Thats the 
kind of stuff to hand them Al — they 7 likes 
it. 

She looked bashful like and coffed a 
little. 

"Mr. Low just came to town with a 
load of grain so I thot Ide step in hear 
and wate fer him," she sez confushed- 
like. 

"I'me sure glad you did," I retortured 
nown full-well it was a fraim up & that 
theyd come 2 town apurpus to look over 



sum plumbing goods. But I dident let 
cn — that aint my style. 

See What We're Here For 

"Now that your hear," I sez, "Ide like 
2 show you arnd. — let you see wot weer 
hear for." & with that I begin to go- 
over every thing in the show-room with 
her. I felt jest like an artist xplainin 
the buties of sum wunderful lanscrape 
paintins. And did the old laidy lissen? 
He saye she did. She hung onto my 
everry werd jest like I ust to hang onto 
Dutch Wagners flys. 

A Voyce at the Door 
I guess I musta bin speelin fer oaver 

% an hr. wen I herd a voyce at the shop 

dore say; "Are you reddy?" 

I looked around & sure enuff it was 

old Sigh hisself. He was look-ii; strate 

at the old lady pertendin like he dident 

see me. 

"Ah how are you Mr. Low," I expostu- 
lates in my most affible manor. 

"Good-day," he recipricates as if the 
effert hurt him. 

"Come- rite in," I continyers, "Ime 
jest xplainen fixtrs 2 Mrs. Low." 

He dident say nothin, I begins the lion 
of tock Ide bin carryin on for the last % 
hr. The old laidy was wize & lissens in 
as if it was all knew stuff she was 
hearin. I watched the old geezer outa 
the korner of my I & I eld C that he 
was fllern every werd I sed. 

"Thats the kinda bath we put in fer 
Si Ensilage," I remarked incidentaly, "a 
5 ft. 6 role rimm." 

The Best You Got 

"That the best you got," he sez 
frownin & lookin at the bath. I purty 
neer lost my ballence with serprize. 

"Oh no," I shoots sudden, "weeve got 
somethin a little better but it dont cost 
much more," & I shode him 1 with a 
shower attachment. Then I got to ex- 
plainen water sistems. & shode him a 
lay-out we had on the flore 2 gether with 
a blue print of a lay-out witch we had on 
the wall. 



March 15, 1923 



Sanitary Engineer, Plumber and Steamfitter 



17 



Shows the Supplies Used in Contracts 

St. John, N.B., Plumber Finds Customers Appre- 
ciate Opportunity of Inspecting and Choosing 
From Varied Stock the Requisites for Their 
Contracts 



"How much wood a compleat outfit 

cost?" he shot at me. 

I purty neer took the count but, a 
managed to keep my feat. 

"Jest come in the office hear," I sez, 
fer I had his job all figgered out as 
neer as possible. "I think I can give 
you a fare estymate." 

I wanted to git him outa the show- 
room for I dident want to have him 
faint bef oar the publik gaze wen I shode 
him the riggers. 

But he dident turn a hare & I new 
that he had a perty good idea hisself 
of what the cost wood B. "Dont you 
think your high," he mermers lookin 
hard at the Aggers. 

Not High 

"No Mr. Low," I sez, "not fer the 
kind of a job you want. And rember 
this, your job is goin 2 have the care- 
fullest of supervizion & if your not sat* 
isfide weal take the hole job out & itll 
cost you nothin." That sounds big Al, 
but it dozent mean nothin. Ide maid 
up my mind he was goin 2 B satisfide 
& that was all their was 2 it. 

"Come out & C me Thurs. nite," he 
sez, & with that he ges up & stawks 
outta the shop the old lady follern him. 
She stole me a look like a grateful dog. 

"All-rite," I siz smilin my grashiest, 
"He B their. Good-by until then." I 
bowed like a Torryadoor with my hat in 
my hand until they was well on the 
weigh. 

"Whew!" the sweat was bustin out of 
evry poar & I felt like Ide bin pitchin a 
dubble hedder at Louisville on a sultery 
day. 

"Jerry your a wunder," come a still 
small voyce from the back of the shop. 

There was Vilet 

1 looked up & their was Vilet smilin 
like a bit of sunshine after a rain. I 
was still week & smiled back weekly. 

"Aw gwan," I sez feelin the blushes 
creapin all over me. 

"Bleeve me Jerry," she sez blushin 
herself, "I opologize for raggin you 
like I did — fer I never herd enny 1 put 
up a better sails tock than you jest put 
over — onnest Injun I dident." 

2 heer Vilet tock that weigh maid me 
feal as if ide drunk a pale full of sham- 
pain. It was 2 good 1 2 B troo. 

"Aw Vilet your foolin — your jest givin 
me a jolly," I manaiges to say not 
known jest what I was sayin. 



LAST spring- W. B. McDonough, 
plumbing and heating contractor, 
opened a large shop on Charlotte 
Street in St. John, one of the busiest 
streets. One half of the s.tore he allotted 
to the sale of plumbing supplies and 
the other half to the sale of hardware. 
In the rear is his plumbing and heating 
contracting and jobbing office. 

Mr. McDonough has placed one of his 



"Dont you bleeve it, — Ime in ded 
ernest." 

"Vilet I eld kiss you fer sayin that," 
I blerts out, & then realizin what I sed 
I makes a iginiminius retreet fer the 
back door. 



sons in charge of the store which is 
equipped with two large display win- 
dows. Attractive window exhibits are ar- 
ranged and changes made at regular in- 
tervals. In the store, Mr. McDonough 
has shown to his clients the supplies he 
uses in his contracts. He